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Lead safety with infant

Discussion in 'Shooting Gear and Storage' started by BigMacMI, Feb 16, 2017.

  1. BigMacMI

    BigMacMI Member

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    Currently, I have my workshop in the basement. All of my cycling tools and spares, and my reloading stuff (dry tumble). I am not a SUPER high volume guy, but will probably reload 2-500 per month when I am shooting often (she shoots too).

    I have begun keeping a pair of shoes at the entry to the room, always keep the door closed, but am concerned about lead contamination in the house. Baby currently isn't crawling, but will soon enough. We do have a living space (TV, couches etc) just outside the loading room. I have noticed walnut shells tracked into the main living space (before the shoe change option).

    I always change shirt and wash with de-lead before being near baby...

    Am thinking of building an insulated lean-to on the back of the garage... something like 10x20 (looking into building codes). Am in Michigan, so temperature swings will be 20-90* realistically throughout the year. I would build with a window for ventilation, and probably heat with propane flower heater in the winter.

    Besides build cost, problems being in these types of temperature extremes? I am thinking more along the lines of metal expansion/contraction in a fairly tight-tolerance hobby.

    Am I over thinking this? Over-protective parent?
     
  2. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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    Yes and yes, IMO.
     
  3. bearcreek

    bearcreek Member

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    Maybe a little over-protective. ;) I think the biggest potential issue with an addition like what you propose would be dampness. You'll need to be very sure to keep it heated all the time in winter, not just when you're using the room.
     
  4. drband

    drband Member

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    You know, switching to wet tumbling would be a lot cheaper than construction costs and would eliminate the dust issue. Common sense clean up after reloading like you already do would take care of the rest of the issue.
     
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  5. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator

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    No reason not to be prudently careful about lead. I think the biggest issue would be tumbling which I'd maybe consider moving outside when you need to tumble and sift. Use good cleanliness/hygiene and changing clothes and shoes is a good idea if you've been doing lead-intensive stuff like that.

    I once had a youngster that came up with elevated levels in a test. County folks came out and did a bunch of testing. Turns out it was her mom's car keys that she liked to play with! The reloading stuff in the basement and casting gear out in the garage didn't seem to factor in at all.
     
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  6. Malamute

    Malamute Member

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    Elsewhere this came up, it turned out there was lead tracked through the house to the second story on the guys shoes. That's only one aspect though, you can reduce the amount available to track or that can get on your clothes. Decapping primers (the dust from lead in the primers) and dry tumbling are the main culprits in producing lead in the reloading operation I believe.
     
  7. CB900F

    CB900F Member

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    Fella's;

    I'd think a good exhaust fan would do a lot to decrease the possibility of contamination in the O.P.'s case. And probably the least expensive way to go also.

    900F
     
  8. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator

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    Hmmm... it may. It really depends on what the actual contamination path is, though. If the hypothetical lead contamination is from airborne dust or vapor, then yes. If it's from skin contact, tracking on shoes, on clothing, then no.

    At our range when there was a bit of a lead scare some years back, it was observed that the bullseye guys tended to bring in a plate of donuts and set it on the range bench and half of them smoked while in there, and so they were constantly putting their lead-covered hands on things they then put in their mouths.

    I think there probably is some airborne exposure risk from dry tumbling dust which is why I suggested doing that outside. But decapping and loading would give you mostly contact risk as those don't put anything up in the air.
     
  9. Malamute

    Malamute Member

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    Yes, I believe the residue from primers from decapping can be large enough and heavy enough particles to simply fall to the ground. I got black flaky and fine chunky crud on the floor under my press and around the ram on the press from decapping residue.
     
  10. crankyoldlady

    crankyoldlady Member

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    I run a long extension cord and do all my tumbling outside behind the garage. I remove the tumbler lid.
     
  11. Malamute

    Malamute Member

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    Ive been pretty impressed with folks reports on using wet tumbling. It can be very simple and do a very good job, with zero dust issues. One guy in particular made me somewhat envious, he was processing 5 gallon buckets of brass at a time, he used a small cement mixer for his wet tumbling.
     
  12. CB900F

    CB900F Member

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    Fella's;

    OK, I made a presumption. The O.P. has stated that his footwear in the reloading room is separate from his footwear outside of it, correct? The presumption was that he'd also be wearing something like surgeon's gloves when working in there. From his original post, I'd think it's a reasonable presumption. Therefore, just the addition of an exhaust fan would bring the risk of contamination down to levels most of us can live with. Or, go ahead & be O.C.D.

    900F
     

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