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Learning on .22lr - Scoped or Iron?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Atticum, Feb 13, 2009.

?

What should a beginner learn first?

  1. Scoped

    3.1%
  2. Iron Sights

    87.5%
  3. Interchange them - its not important

    9.4%
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  1. Atticum

    Atticum Member

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    Hey all.

    I'm a new shooter and I want to learn the right way, if such a thing exists.

    I bought my Marlin 60 and I'm taking it to the 25yard range tonight after work to practice groupings and single shot placement.

    Is it worth it to learn how to shoot with iron sights first? My friend lent me a cheap air rifle scope and wants me to put it on, but I'm hesitant. I'm not looking to blaze through to the next level, I want to learn the right way.

    P.S. I'm new to the high road and I really enjoy the posts here. Thanks!
     
  2. SoCalShooter

    SoCalShooter Member

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    That's for me to know and not you!
    Most new shooters that I train I start with the IRON sights, scopes are cool but knowing how to use the irons is tantamount to using the scope.
     
  3. 3pairs12

    3pairs12 Member

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    Irons first definitely.
     
  4. shotgunjoel

    shotgunjoel Member

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    Don't use an air rifle scope. Air rifles recoil differently than actual firearms so the scopes are built differently. If you put a rifle scope on an air rifle I've heard that it will tear it to pieces pretty quick. Also I think that you should use a scope at first, they are simple to aim. I just think that it's one more new thing coming at you if you learn on irons. Once you are more comfortable shooting, take off the scope and use the irons.
     
  5. PotatoJudge

    PotatoJudge Member

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    Either. The basics of shooting are the same. I prefer to teach new shooters with a scope for a number of reasons, mostly dealing with improved feedback and satisfaction.
     
  6. CoRoMo

    CoRoMo Member

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    .22 rifles are the most fun with good irons.
    Use the irons until you can pick off rabbits at 100 yards.
    Then you'll never even think of mounting a scope on it.
     
  7. Funderb

    Funderb Member

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    Irons. It will build your skill first.
    and it is more fun.

    I shoot scopes too. But I still like irons.

    think about it, you are out hunting, plinking, you never learned to use irons,
    and you drop your rifle and bend / unzero / shatter the lens of your scope.

    Now what are you going to do?

    Granted, a lot of new rifles do not have irons any more,
    all of mine do.
     
  8. BlueSmoke

    BlueSmoke Member

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    Irons, definitely. It's like driving a stick vs. auto. You ought to know how and gives you a better feel for the machine. I once had a scope bust a seal and fog up inside on a hunt. Fortunately, it was on a rifle that happened to have iron sights, so I was able to take the glass off and resight it in and continue the hunt...successfully.

    I have two Ruger .22s for plinking. One is a 77 bolt with iron sights and the other a 10/22 auto with a scope on it. The 10/22 is fun, but I find the 77 far more satisfying after a while.

    I also prefer iron sights when hunting in brush, much easier to acquire the target than with glass and it's at relatively short range anyhow.
     
  9. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Once you learn to shoot iron sights, you can shoot anything.

    If you learn to shoot only with a scope, you will be severely handicapped when Unkle Sam hands you an M-16!

    rc
     
  10. Bearhands

    Bearhands Member

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    Irons... ESPECIALLY for beginners. The sight radius (view) from a scope severely limits the user from noticing something that might be crossing the path of the bullet. Using iron sights with both eyes open enables a much larger view of the surroundings. Also, the natural "point" of the gun is realized immediately with a sight mounted at the end of the barrel.
     
  11. Atticum

    Atticum Member

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    Thanks for the responses! This is great, I will definitely be using irons.

    rcmodel - that might be in my near future, so it makes even more sense to use irons. thanks!
     
  12. Clipper

    Clipper Member

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    Once you get proficient with the factory leaf sights, you should try a set of peep sights. If you're going into the service, peeps are what Unka Sam uses.
     
  13. usmc1371

    usmc1371 Member

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    Learn the irons. They are great for teaching proper sight picture and sight alignment also find some one at the range who can explain what your sight picture should look like. Plus learning iron sights will be a plus when you start shooting handguns and shot guns. And its just plain old fun.
     
  14. rmuzz

    rmuzz Member

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    The reasons that I heard air rifles eat rifle scopes is because the movement and recoil motion of an air rifle is a double recoil, and its vibration is much different, meaning pellet gun scopes are designed differently than any other firearm scope so they withstand the stresses better. A pellet gun is much harsher to scope than a .22lr, so in theory it would work using your pellet gun scope on a your rifle... I'd be sure though before trying it. It might be just a cheapy, but its probably perfectly suited for its intended purpose... don't want waste things.
     
  15. Atticum

    Atticum Member

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    thanks again for the helpful input. I shot for the first time today and it was a lot of fun!! I wish I took pictures, but at 25 yards i was in the bullseye and 9 pt ring on a full size silhouette target. Whens a good time to switch to a low power scope?
     
  16. mljdeckard

    mljdeckard Member

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    I am currently going through a bit of a voluntary re-training. I never got rifle fundamentals as well as I wanted to. I was a scrawny kid and I couldn't hold a rifle still. Then when I went into the army, I was disappointed to find out that their rifle training wasn't all that thorough. I find now that I can do well enough with a scope, but if I really want to be serious, I need to go back to a .22 with irons out to 100 yards, until I have found the accuracy limits of the rifle. (I tell people that the army isn't a great place to go if you like shooting. Limited trigger time with a narrow variety of weapons and ammo.)

    All the accuracy-intended sniper-style rifles I bought and let go over the last 15 years were a waste of money, since my shooting wasn't good enough to justify more than any standard, non-exotic, bolt-action hunting rifle. It goes back to the fundamentals. My boys are old enough to start shooting, so we'll do it together. When I've maxed out the .22 at 100, I'll take the SKS to the range and shoot it until I have a 3" ragged hole at 100 yards. THEN I'll let myself pick up scopes again.
     
  17. husker

    husker Member

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    iron,iron,iron,iron,iron,iron,iron,iron,iron,iron,iron, im board time for bed
     
  18. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    I prefer scopes. I shoot a lot better. If you are just doing general shooting, a 4x scope (1" tube rimfire scope) works well and they are inexpensive. The 3-9x rimfire scopes work too, they are just a little larger. You can find them for around $50 or you can spend $100's. Just depends on what you want and can afford. I'm guessing $50 is about right for a Model 60.
     
  19. Eb1

    Eb1 Member

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    I love my Model 60 with irons. I do have a scope on it now for bench shooting, but when I am walking the lease; I prefer irons. The gun is so light and fast with irons.

    This is an on going debate, and one that will never be answered.

    Shot it with irons. It will save you money right now for ammo, and it is plenty accurate with the irons.
     
  20. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    You can learn to be very fast with a scope also. Just takes some practice.
     
  21. d2wing

    d2wing Member

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    Iron sights. Don't skip the fundimentals. You can add a scope later. If your vision is good you may prefer iron sights with a .22. A cheap scope may not
    help much but that depends on several factors. Some people prefer iron because they can shoot with both eyes open and they can dope shots much quicker with experience.
     
  22. ken22250

    ken22250 Member

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    irons, then an apataure sight, then a scope.
    ken
     
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