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Lee Enfield bolt assembly replacement

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing and Repairs' started by CSestp, Apr 21, 2013.

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  1. CSestp

    CSestp Member

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    Hey guys, I recently bought and then proceeded to blow it up with reloads i bought with the rifle. I know how many unwritten rules I broke right there, but alas what is done is done. It seems that the bolt took the brunt of the force and is the only thing damaged. I was wondering how to know which bolt assembly to buy as a replacement. Some pictures with where to look on my rifle would be nice as well.
     
  2. Robert

    Robert Moderator Staff Member

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    Are we talking about a No1 or a No4? Also, I would have the rifle looked at by a decent gun smith to make sure the blow up didn't effect something else. Never know what my have fractures in it.

    What happened to the bolt? A new bolt body it pretty simple to find from Numrich but finding the correct head may be difficult. The round head spaces off the rim and can use different bolt heads to achieve proper head space.
     
  3. briansmithwins

    briansmithwins Member

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    The bolt head can be replaced by itself but: The different models use different heads and the head sets headspace.

    Excess headspace can result in another blown rifle.

    BSW
     
  4. rondog

    rondog Member

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    Try Liberty Tree Collectors, they have tons of Enfield parts, so they're bound to know something and have what you need.
     
  5. aka108

    aka108 Member

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    Springfield Sporters is also a good source for Enfield rifle parts.
     
  6. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    Any "blowup" that would damage the bolt would also damage the bolt lug seats in the receiver and, especially if it is a No. 1, probably bend the action as well. I would second the comment about having a gunsmith check it out, and not be too surprised if the verdict is that you have a wall-hanger.

    Jim
     
  7. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    What he said.

    You can't just 'blow up a bolt' without seriously damaging the receiver locking recesses too.

    rc
     
  8. CSestp

    CSestp Member

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    It is a No 4 the gun smith is a given, i first want to know how much a bottom dollar repair is going to be. If the only thing wrong is the bolt assbly, but costs 125 bucks to replace on a 300 gun ill just find a new gun. Bit if it only costs 50 bucks go through the motions.

    Sent from my MB865 using Tapatalk 2
     
  9. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    Gun Parts Corp (www.gunpartscorp.com - under SMLE) shows the bolt bodies at $33 and the bolt heads at about $15 for any size. Since you have not posted pictures and are not clear on what was damaged or how much, or what parts are available for re-use, I can't help much on other parts. I suggest you go the gunsmith route first; there is no point in spending money on a bolt or bolt parts if the receiver is junk.

    Jim
     
  10. CSestp

    CSestp Member

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    I fully agree.
     
  11. Slamfire

    Slamfire Member

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    How about some pictures of the bolt and the rifle? It would give us an idea of the damage and feasiblity of repair?

    Glad you were not hurt.
     
  12. TRX

    TRX Member

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    First I'd try to find a similar Enfield locally, or hook up with someone local via surplusrifles.com or enfield-rifles.com, and do a critical eyeball inspection of the locking lug cuts in my receiver. If they're smeared or buggered by comparison, I'd demote the action to "wall hanger."

    If the recesses look reasonably similar to the other rifle, I'd strip the action down as far as it would go, then find a local engine rebuiilder who has a Magnaflux rig. I used to pay $10 for a local shop to check stuff for me.

    In practice, a gunsmith isn't going to be able to do any better, and he probably doesn't have a Magnaflux rig, so he'd try to see any cracks by eye. If your bolt is badly damaged, checking the headspace wouldn't tell him anything useful.

    If the rifle passes the visual and Magnaflux checks, buy another bolt and move on from their. Be aware that headspacing on an SMLE can be somewhat controversial...
     
  13. CSestp

    CSestp Member

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    I suppose this is my own fault for not posting earlier. I am quite aware of what damage could have been done to the receiver and the fact that it needs to be checked out along with all the other safety precautions. I will say the Magnaflux is something I hadn't thought of. I will take some pictures and probably post them tonight. By blow up i just mean that the bolt cracked not any sort of real blow up. Once again I do know if that amount of damage/energy went to the bolt that the rest needs to be inspected. What I need is good leads on bolt assembly's.

    This does not mean I want to just go out and buy another and slap it in. I thank you all for advice and will fully heed it.
     
  14. koala

    koala Member

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    koala

    I am in possession of the full armourers sets of gauges/tools for measuring
    the actions of Lee Enfield No1 and No4 rifles.
    I have seen many of these with stretched actions caused by "reloaders" who
    appointed themselves as an expert on what to fire from these weapons.
    The first gauge resembles a bare bolt body and will tell you if the action is stretched beyond use. These weapons were stamped "DP" and not to be used again,but are fit only for Drill Purposes.
    Satisfied that your action is now inside safety specs,we proceed to use a bolt gauge jig to prove your bolt has not been deformed.
    After this you may try a minimum size bolt head "Size O" and work your way
    up to "Size 3" if needed.
    If your weapon has been abused or subjected to "someones" reloads
    approach with caution and extra scrutiny. Merely fitting a longer bolt head
    onto a weapon known to have been previously abused and damaged is the
    action of a very brave person.
     
  15. paintballdude902

    paintballdude902 Member

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    id put money the receiver is stretched. get it head spaced and if its too far out of spec then part it out, the receiver is done...
     
  16. BBBBill

    BBBBill Member

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    Unfortunately, those armorer's gauges and tool are rare/nonexistent here in the states. We don't have enough of a demand for them to justify someone tooling up to produce them. I've been able to purchase original/reproduction gauges for the M-1 Garand since those are more common here.
     
  17. Ken70

    Ken70 Member

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    The British government put out a notice not to shoot Enfields a while back. The corrosive ammo and not cleaning the barrel left a really rough throat. The bullet would "hang up" on the rough throat and cause a pressure spike.

    It was only after a gunsmith had looked at the throat and gave the gun an OK, were you allowed to use it.
     
  18. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    That sounds odd. I can't imagine any throat so rough as to stop or impede a bullet. An eroded throat allows the bullet to skew coming out of the case neck and that causes inaccuracy because the bullet itself is distorted. But I suspect that anyone who says that throat erosion causes a "pressure spike" has been spending a bit too much time at the "local."

    Jim
     
  19. Ken70

    Ken70 Member

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    It was the British Government; not some joker on a forum.
     
  20. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    I am aware of warnings that throat erosion will be highly detrimental to accuracy and recommendations that older MkIIIs not be fired unless checked out. I was not aware that the MOD considered erosion to be a danger factor.

    Jim
     
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