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Let's talk aluminum baseball bats

Discussion in 'Non-Firearm Weapons' started by Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow, Mar 13, 2009.

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  1. Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow

    Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow member

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    Haven't played softball in over 10 years, but used to. Other day I was perusing the massive spring collection at Academy and ended up buying a couple that were marked way down - one for softball, and one just for playing around and/or self-defense. Have to say, I really like these. The differences are in the length and weight of course.

    All the ones I bought had the 2.25" barrels:

    The softball bat is 34 inches, 26 oz. Feels about right for slow-pitch softball, though I'd have preferred a 32 inch, 24-25 oz one for myself (at 5' 8" tall and 170 lbs).

    The bat I bought that I think would be handy for self-defense is a "Little League Baseball" bat, and it's 32 inches and 19.5 oz. Feels very lively and good in the hand.

    Another bat that felt super-lively was a "Fastpitch Softball" bat, and it was only 28 inches long, and only 18 oz. But I'm sure it could crack some noggins in a self-defense situations.

    Anyone else get a kick out of these for something besides baseball/softball?
     
  2. Attila The Killa

    Attila The Killa Member

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    I recently took up baseball and was thinking the same thing. One of these to the skull = PAIN, and lots of it. I wouldn't recommend letting the kids play lightsabers with these. It could be great for persuading someone to think twice before breaking into your house again :)
     
  3. highorder

    highorder Member

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    Remember to keep a ball and glove with the bat, especially in your car.
     
  4. JImbothefiveth

    JImbothefiveth Member

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    An aluminum bat might even kill.
     
  5. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    If previous discussions are any indication, aluminum T-ball, soft-ball and baseball bats are an obvious favorite.


    On the other hand, it should be considered a lethal weapon when applied to the ball-shaped thing on top of people's shoulders.
     
  6. Duke of Doubt

    Duke of Doubt member

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    The aluminum bats dent and bend on impact -- particularly repeated impact. Aluminum telescoping door clubs bend and break apart, too, at least when used as improvised clubs.

    I carry a small wooden bat in my car, along the left side of the cockpit. Never had a problem from cops; one even laughed pretty hard. I was on my way to court, and dressed like a respectable professional; I just happened to have a frigging baseball bat in my car -- I told him it was for collecting fees. He didn't remark nearly so much on the 9mm pistol; that was "normal."
     
  7. Marlin 45 carbine

    Marlin 45 carbine Member

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    drill holes completely through the tip and drive tight-fitting nails (16 penny or bigger) that you have ground the points down sharp on. 6 or 8 should do it. 'pain factor' X's 10.:what:
     
  8. sm

    sm member

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    NO!


    I was foreman of the Jury, and the case was looking pretty favorable until the evidence was described and then placed into evidence.
    That boy went to jail and and also faced civil suit!

    The evidence was a old wooden baseball bat, that had been "modified".

    THR does NOT condone illegal acts, or the promoting of ideas that will not only result in someone getting into serious trouble with the Law, also in the courtroom.
    It puts THR as a forum and all members of Staff at risk for Legal action as well.


    Pay Attention:

    Anything one uses to defend themselves will be described as "Weapon" by first responders, and in a courtroom.

    I do not care if it is your shoe, 20oz bottle of water from a vending machine, your disposable Bic ink pen, your child's tippy cup, car keys...etc.
     
  9. TimboKhan

    TimboKhan Moderator

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    I am a huge advocate of the bat as a weapon of defense. Easy to use, can do a lot of damage, cheap.

    I second what SM said: No need to modify it further. A bat to the skull is sufficient and defensible (depending on the circumstances, I guess). A nail-filled bat to the skull is probably a felony in most states.

    Besides all that, how in the world are you going to defend a bat as a weapon of opportunity when it looks like, you know, this:

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Riss

    Riss Member

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    Bat with nails = medieval mace. Way cool. Would rather use an Oak softball bat. 2x or 3x the weight of an AL bat.
     
  11. Art Eatman

    Art Eatman Administrator Staff Member

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    You've gone about as far as you can go with, "Hmmm. A baseball bat can be used as a self-defense weapon."

    Folks hve been doing that for over a hundred years. Most figured it out before their teen years.

    Advocating something as incredibly foolish as making a bat into a mace is, aside from being illegal, not in any way acceptable for any member of THR. That idea has to work its way upward to reach "contempt".

    Enough.
     
  12. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    That's about the worst advice possible. SM and TK are absolutely correct in saying this takes a simple piece of sports equipment and turns it into a felony conviction for you if you ever end up using it. It also takes a simple effective club and turns it into a badly balanced "club". Add the fact now that you have to be concerned with cutting/snagging yourself with the thing.

    Let's avoid suggesting "Thunderdome" silliness.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2009
  13. Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow

    Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow member

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    While that's not what this thread is about, and while I had and have no intention of doing it (making a mace or spiked club), I am absolutely floored by the responses of sm, timbo, Art, and hso.

    Absolutely incredible to me, that *talking about* a particular homemade weapon, which is far less deadly than a GUN fercripessake (ya know, the main thrust of the entire forum), is somehow a faux paus.

    How is a spiked club any more "evil" or "illegal" (allegedly) than the many many threads on axes, spears, halberds, swords, hatchets, shovels, etc., etc., etc.?

    And it's not illegal either *necessarily*, either; rather, its legality (possession of a spiked club) is going to vary state to state and country to country, and almost certainly the majority of states would not find it illegal for use in the HOME. Note that neither my original post, nor the initial suggestion of the spiked club, express or implied any use outside the home, and therefore any potential illegal use via "carrying", which is perhaps illegal in some states.

    I remain quite shocked and very very :confused: by the the kneejerk responses here, in a "Non-Firearm WEAPONS" forum.


    That is saying that "aside" from illegality (alleged), this is inherently wrong somehow. WTH?? :confused: Would it be ok if purchased instead of homemade or what? This is way way off base, for the very intelligent, savvy, learned, and (ordinarily) logical moderator and friend Art, IMO. :p

    I really think a *modification* of opinions is warranted here, no? Or, perhaps there is something I do not understand about the parameters of discussion of this subforum.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2009
  14. Weezy

    Weezy Member

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    It's the same advice as when people recommend you don't stencil "DUKE OF DEATH" on the side of your home-defense shotgun. If you do ever have to use it, remember that it's going in front of a jury.
     
  15. Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow

    Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow member

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    Actually, no, it's not the same at all. Adding to the *actual effectiveness* of a weapon's ability to incapacitate is not all the same as adding words evidencing a reasonably-inferred intent to kill (improper when the intent should be to stop an attack).

    And even if it was, it's STILL not the same as what Art suggested, that it's "incredibly foolish", implying that's somehow inherently "evil" to modify a weapon to make it more capable of rapid incapacitation. I submit that making an already deadly weapon into a different deadly weapon with a greater ability to quickly incapacitate is not necessarily foolish, and in fact not foolish at all if it's the only weapon you have; to the contrary, it's quite wise. In fact, the sentiment expressed is indistinguishable from chastising someone for using those deadly hollowpoint bullets in a gun used for self-defense. Takes a weapon, and makes it more effective than it previously was (with the unfortunate but acceptable side effect that it also happens to make it more deadly). These attitudes would doubtless fit in seamlessly in NJ, where a citizens' use of hollowpoints is illegal.

    Look at the picture posted by timbo. I submit that just LOOKING at someone weilding that thing in self-defense is gonna cause a certain percentage of otherwise-determined thugs to flee in fear, actually saving them some bodily harm, not to mention that of the victim, possibly. It's quite fear-invoking. This is a GOOD thing, in a self-defense weapon, as it can work to AVOID violence.
     
  16. Odd Job

    Odd Job Member

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    Plenty people in the emergency room from broken bones from a baseball bat.
    When I was a student I remember seeing a fairly beefy bouncer in the theatre with a fractured ulna from an aluminium baseball bat.

    For those who don't know, South African aluminium is the no-nonsense version of 'aluminum' :neener:
     
  17. DesmoDucRob

    DesmoDucRob Member

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    When I consider a self-defense weapon, I always take into account the perspective of the ignorant. I don't mean that insultingly, I am talking about those who are legitimately unfamilliar with self-defense weapons. I take into account the fact that this weapon may be judged by those people. For those reasons I've always thought a baseball bat "when kept with a glove and ball" as Highorder said, would make a fine (effective) self-defense weapon. Remember that the purpose of self-defense is SELF-DEFENSE. It would be easy to explain the use of a shotgun for home defense when you have a pair of mallards mounted on your wall. ...same applies to non-firearms.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2009
  18. Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow

    Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow member

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    Sure, I can see that, but (a) there's a difference between discussing the wisdom of using weapon 'X' in political climate & jury pool 'Y', and banning the topic from discussion, along with chastising those who brought it up. And, (b) I see your point, but I submit that that attitude is one of meek peasants, not citizens in a country where legitimate self-defense is perfectly legal.

    I for one think that it is indeed a pretty good idea to keep a ball & glove if you carry a bat in a vehicle. But in the home, I don't think you need any justification for the deadliest, quickest-incapacitating weapon you can legally get your hands on.
     
  19. RyanM

    RyanM Member

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    I'm a fan of platininium baseball bats, myself.

    ---------------

    I believe what you meant to say is that you wish you didn't need any justification, or that if the world were perfect, you wouldn't need any justification. The way the legal system "works" in most places, anyone with an IQ over 80 is likely to be dismissed as a juror, for being biased (towards the truth). End up in front of a jury of people who think that empathizing and bargaining with a criminal is a viable tactic, and the results won't be very pretty for you, if you used something like a baseball bat with spikes in it.

    Even an "evil" assault weapon would be easier to defend in court. Those at least tend to have some pride of ownership and "cool factor" associated with them, completely absent from a crude makeshift weapon; i.e., you might say you bought a rifle just like the one in your favorite movie, and that it was the only thing handy. Or it was bought pre-election as an investment, and you decided to keep it instead of selling it. A be-spiked baseball bat isn't much of an investment.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2009
  20. JShirley

    JShirley Administrator Staff Member

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    Somewhat true...if it actually increased the effectiveness of the weapon. Since it doesn't, and greatly increases the probability of going to jail if used as modified, it's incredibly foolish to advocate such a thing.

    Incidentally, relying on "deterrent factor" in your weapons to stop a potentially lethal threat is incredibly stupid, whether your defensive tool is a manual weapon or a 12 gauge. It's more the bailiwick of Counter-Strike internet commandos than anyone's who actually serious and even semi-knowledgeable about self-defense.

    John
     
  21. Duke of Doubt

    Duke of Doubt member

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    DesmoDucRob: "I take into account the fact that this weapon may be judged by those people."

    Me, too, to an extent. My carry gun is a Beretta 92FS. If asked why I selected that particular weapon, I can say, truthfully, that part of the reason was that it is carried by our Army soldiers and used to be carried by our State Police -- before they upgraded to the H&K .45. Thus, it is a patriotic and civic choice, and arguably less deadly than what our State Police now carry. Now, in my home is a different matter. In the event of a home invasion, I honestly do not expect to be asked those sort of questions with much force. Accordingly, I may choose to defend my home with my .44 magnum Smith 29, or with my SAR-1 and a full thirty round magazine. After all, it's my home, and a different level of scrutiny tends to apply.
     
  22. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    Let us dispel this myth once and for all. A baseball bat is no less lethal a weapon than a gun. Not one bit.

    It may be used in a manner that does not kill, but a blow to the skull will end your days as quickly, and perhaps more certainly, than a pistol shot to the head. Same goes for all but the lightest/smallest club-like weapons.
     
  23. Byron Quick

    Byron Quick Moderator In Memoriam

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    Got some real world experience for you people who think the gun is oh, so much more deadly than a bat, club, or other blunt instrument.

    I've ten years experience working the emergency department. I've seen a few stabbings, cuttings, shootings, and bludgeonings. The vast majority of the stabbings, cuttings, and shootings survived. Out of the people who sustained blows to the head with a blunt instrument exactly one 'survived,' if you want to call being on a ventilator in a nursing home with no brain wave activity...'survival.' Based on the testimony of my eyes, a blow to the cranium by a blunt instrument is more dangerous than being shot by a handgun or stabbed by a knife. And that includes chest cavity trauma.

    Some states specifically prohibit the nails deal. In others nails would probably turn a 'no true bill' by the grand jury into an indictment.
     
  24. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    So let's recap:

    Clubs are deadly weapons. As much as any handgun.

    Clubs are effective deadly weapons.

    Modification of clubs is a waste of time and can result in your self-defense claim going out the window and you ending up being charged with a homicide. Establishing intent is much easier when your club looks like something from Hollywood.

    Modification of a club makes you far more susceptible to a successful civil lawsuit from the BG's survivors.
     
  25. nalioth

    nalioth Member

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    . . . and what country do you live in?

    So why do some states' laws have "threat of deadly force" lumped in with "deadly force"?

    Isn't the point to negate the situation? Isn't it best to negate it without bloodshed?
     
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