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lever gun: .45-70 or .30-30?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Gifted, Mar 20, 2005.

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  1. Gifted

    Gifted Member

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    Someone on a board(can't remember which one) stated the opinion that there should be a .30-30 lever gun in each house. I'm not in complete disagreement, I plan on having a lever in the collection. With smokeless, a .45-70 is a nice peice of ammo. So, which would you prefer in a lever gun?
     
  2. Gifted

    Gifted Member

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    Edited: Wrong thread, and it won't let me delete.
     
  3. R.H. Lee

    R.H. Lee Member

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    I have a Marlin 336 30-30 that is way fun. I've often thought I wanted a 45-70, but have no idea why. I'm not a hunter and 45-70 ammo is real expensive. Maybe I'm happy with just the 30-30. :)
     
  4. Murphster

    Murphster Member

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    Ammo costs may be the deciding factor. 45-70 is the first cartridge I reloaded. That really helps keep costs down. Manufacturers are proud of their 45-70 ammo. Plenty of history associated with 45-70. It was a fine black powder cartridge and it made the transition to smokeless nicely. They've been used to kill every big mean thing in Africa including elephant and they can be loaded down for pleasant range plinking. I've still got a ported, stainless guide gun in 45-70. I use it to hone my flinching skills. I particularly like the Marlin safety which I frequently leave on accidentally when I pull the trigger. Nothing like a quiet click accompanied by a dramatic flinch and a quick look around to see who noticed. But, if I had to buy factory ammo and money was a factor, I think I'd might be happy with 30-30. I've heard it theorized that more deer have been taken with that round than any other. Either one is a fine cartridge but that 45-70 is one big piece of ammo. End of ramblings.
     
  5. JohnKSa

    JohnKSa Member

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    With the cowboy action craze in full swing, lead bullet 45/70 is available from several companies at pretty reasonable prices. My guess is you can get this stuff for less than $15 a box pretty easily if you shop around.

    Even the hotter stuff can be had at decent prices--Saturday, I picked up a box of the new PMC loading--350gr JSP @ 2050fps from a local shop. There are actually 2 shops within 10 miles of my house that carry this load and both of them price it under $20. Southwest Ammunition Supply in Mesquite is the winner at $17.25! :D
     
  6. EghtySx

    EghtySx Member

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    I have a 16" Winchester 94 in 30-30 and it is fun to shoot. 30-30 is big enough for any Texas game up to 100 yards or a little more. I use it in wooded areas where I am not likely to get a shot any farther. I get Winchester 150gr power points for $10 a box tax and all at Wal-Mart.
     
  7. RoyG

    RoyG Member

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    Everyone should have a 30-30 in their safe...
     
  8. Smoke

    Smoke Member

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    Everyone should have a .30-30 and a 45-70 in thier safe.

    But if I was forced to choose I'd opt for the 45-70. Have a .30-30 that was one of my primary go-to guns for years. It rarely leaves the safe after getting a Marlin 1895 45-70.

    Ammo price is comparable. Shop a little.

    Smoke
     
  9. GreenFurniture

    GreenFurniture Member

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    Get the 30-30 and when the bug for a larger lever gun bites you, skip the 45-70 and go for the 450 Marlin. But put a larger loop on it, 'cause it tends to eat knuckles.
     
  10. rick_reno

    rick_reno member

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    I've got both. I tend to take the 30-30 out a lot more than the 45-70, I'll confess I don't find shooting my ported 45-70 guide gun much fun and so far the 30-30 has killed every deer I've had the opportunity to come across.
     
  11. DSRUPTV

    DSRUPTV Member

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    I traded my 30-30 in on a 45-70 and haven't looked back since. The 45-70 is a blast to shoot, but does wear on the shoulder faster than a 30-30. I still have to get a good recoil pad. In my experience ammo runs about $18-$20 per box with the hevily loaded Buffalo Bore stuff being more expensive. My Dad has a friend working on some reloads for me to try out soon.
     
  12. NMshooter

    NMshooter Member

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    The more you want to shoot either caliber the more you will need to reload.

    Personally I would rather have a 30-30, but the 45-70 is better for hunting up north.

    No problems with either, shoot both and see what you like.
     
  13. MrMurphy

    MrMurphy Member

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    I had a .30-30. Now I have a .44 levergun. 10 shots, powerful for the range it's made for (100 yards) and I have a .303 for longer range.
     
  14. adaman04

    adaman04 Member

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    .45/70's are so badass. I want a Marlin Guide Gun with ghost ring sites and maybe a scout mount. :)
     
  15. steveno

    steveno Member

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    if I was going to get another 45-70 lever I would get a Winchester 1886 becuase the stock design is a hell of a lot better than a Marlin. I had a guide gun and while it is a well made rifle the stock design sucks so it kicks a lot. I still have a Ruger #1S in 45-70 and I won't ever get rid of it. it is a great round and even better if you reload
     
  16. 355sigfan

    355sigfan member

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    Depends on what you want. I prefer the 45-70 because with the right ammo its a great bear defense round in a handy lever action.
    Pat
     
  17. JohnKSa

    JohnKSa Member

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    steveno,

    Are you sure you haven't got that backwards? I had always heard the reverse--that the Win stock design amplified recoil compared to the Marlin configuration.

    I've not shot an 1886 so I'm just repeating what I've heard.
     
  18. homeka45

    homeka45 Member

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    I vote for one in each caliber. :)
     
  19. Lobotomy Boy

    Lobotomy Boy Member

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    Few guns pack as hard a wallop as a 45-70. Truth be told, it hurts like hell to shoot a hot 45-70 round. I would like one for certain application like bear hunting, but for deer hunting or just shooting I'd much rather use a 30-30. It all depends on what you plan to use the gun for. I really don't feel the need to beat the crap out of myself if I don't have to.
     
  20. CRridermike

    CRridermike Member

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    i have a winchester 94 30-30 right now that i inharited from my grandpa but for some reason i really want a marlin 45-70 eventhough i have never shot one. next gun i buy will be a 45-70 i think.
     
  21. mainmech48

    mainmech48 Member

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    Back when I was a boy in SW Missouri, it seemed that nearly everyone did.

    Besides some sort of shotgun and a .22 rifle, a '94 or a Marlin 336 in .30/30 was the centerfire most likely to be found in any given closet. A milsurp bolt action of some sort might join them if there was more than one hunter in the house.

    Why not? IMO, the .30/30 was there for several good reasons:

    Ammo was relatively cheap and you could get a box at nearly any gas station/general store no matter how far out in the tules you went.

    It had adequate power for the largest game animal they were after locally, and was equally well-suited for use as a rural home defender if needed.

    They didn't break much, and took a lot of beating to wear out. Besides, they probably inherited it from their Dad or Grandpa and if it was good enough for them.....

    It's real close to the max in what the average once-a-year hunter could tolerate in recoil and noise and still shoot well enough to hit his deer.

    Besides those milsurps, they were the cheapest 'deer rifle' option around at the time.

    Now that you've got me thinking about it, I'll have to look around for a nice pre-lawyer 336 .30/30 to go with my .35 Rem. and .45/70 '95G. Everyone should have one!
     
  22. 20cows

    20cows Member

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    30-30 or45-70?

    I split the difference. 38-55.
     
  23. Skyviking

    Skyviking Member

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    A .30-30 lever gun doesn't raise any eyebrows stashed in your truck/trunk. It can handle all the 4 OR 2-legged critters one is likely to encounter on the North and South American continent at the ranges it was designed to be used (0-250 yds.)

    A $150 Marlin 336 will not break the bank if it's stolen with/out of your car, either. A M336 or M-94 with a set of Ghost ring sights, sling, and a ammo cuff will get you out of most any situation.

    If you are in BIG bear country, then get a .45-70 too.
     
  24. Cosmoline

    Cosmoline Member

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    These days .45/70 has a huge edge over .30/30 In a modern levergun the .45/70 covers a far wider range of applications. It can be downloaded to cowboy levels or uploaded into a serious magnum rifle. It's also extremely easy to reload for and cast bullets are easy to find and inexpensive. The .30/30 covers only one area of ballistics--the 1,800 to 2,000 ft. lbs inside 100 yards area. .45/70 bullets can hit with less than 1,000 ft. lbs. for small game loads to over 3,000 ft. lbs. for the buf. bore magnums. Read "Forty-Five Years with the .45/70" for more information. It's a truly amazing cartridge.
     
  25. Nathanael_Greene

    Nathanael_Greene Member

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    Because I'm a cheapskate and don't reload, I'll take the 30-30.

    Or just for fun, 357.
     
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