Light For Home Defense Gun And Mounting?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Accessories, Holsters, and Optics' started by Scrod314, Sep 6, 2021.

  1. Scrod314

    Scrod314 Member

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    Hello...
    I am considering a light for my Glock 17 Generation 4. Lots of options. I like the Streamlight TLR versions. I'm confused about the options offered. Some have these little finger grips (like a wing nut) on what I think is the battery compartment. There are multiple mounting versions. Can someone tell me exactly what I should get? I don't really care about the strobe light setting. Are these rechargeable? Thanks for your help.
     
  2. Robert

    Robert Administrator Staff Member

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    My duty gun is equiped with a TLR-1. It has the "wing nut" switch. It is easy to activate, even for someone with smaller hands like me. One side is momentary on, the other is constant on. I believe it's 1000 lumens.
     
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  3. herrwalther

    herrwalther Member

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    The TLR are good lights. The wingnut type flapper is what they use on the TLR 1, 1HL (just a higher lumen model), 2 (TLR 1 with a laser), and many other models. The flapper is popular because it has a constant on as well as momentary. And easy to reach with either hand. To replace the battery, there is a catch near the flapper switch the folds the assembly to expose the batteries.

    The newer TLR models like the 7A, 9, and 10 uses a button you push forward. They have either a "high" and "low" button depending on how you grip your firearm. With a high button, I can push the on button with my trigger finger pretty easily. The batteries load opposite for these. The head of the flashlight screws off to replace the batteries. The contour models have an extension that follows the trigger guard and puts a pressure switch button right about where the middle finger rests on the grip. Because you have a Glock, the contour model will fit. The RM models are designed for mounting on carbines and shotguns.

    The regular 7 (no A) and 8 uses a similar button but you push it in, toward the frame of the firearm. The button sits just outside the trigger guard so it is harder to reach with one hand.

    Streamlight does not have a rechargeable option. But you can use rechargeable batteries. I have been using rechargeable batteries in my lights for years with no issues. You can get packs of 2, 4 or more RCR123s off Amazon with a charger for decent prices. Any of the Streamlight models will fit a Glock. They come with a set of keys that you can try out which one fits best for pretty much any railed firearm. As far as what model to get, that is up to you. Decide how many lumens you want, laser or not, etc and just narrow down your choices.
     
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  4. Zerodefect

    Zerodefect Member

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    Too bright for me.

    I use a wee lil Surefire xc1.
     
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  5. Scrod314

    Scrod314 Member

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    Thanks, yous guys. I saw one for around $100, but it is only 300 lumens. Probably want something a little brighter? Other option is 1000 lumens for like $145?
     
  6. JTQ

    JTQ Member

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    If you have a couple of hand held lights with various lumens, try lighting up a room in your house and determine what amount of light works for you.

    A 1000 lumen may be too bright for indoor use.

    I think we may have talked about this in another thread, but there are a lot of good lights out there. If you ever want to put the gun with the light mounted in a holster, even if not to carry, but simply to cover the trigger, find a holster you like and see what lights they cover. Picking an odd-ball light that nobody makes holsters for can make your life a little more difficult. Most holster makers will cover a Streamlight TLR7/8 or a Surefire 300.

    As an example, here is Dale Fricke's listing for their Gideon Elite. See what light options they offer for the G17. Working backwards may make your life easier.
     
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  7. JTQ

    JTQ Member

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  8. Scrod314

    Scrod314 Member

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    I'm sorry I was lazy and didn't check. I was confused about the mounting options and the wing nut thing.
     
  9. JTQ

    JTQ Member

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    No problem at all. They are valid questions.
     
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  10. earplug

    earplug Member

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    A couple of simple motion lights in the home will help your wife take the dog out while your sleeping and illuminate any threat.
     
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  11. shoobe01

    shoobe01 Member

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    Except there are power outages all the time. And lights fail. And, and, and. A WML is a good thing, and I consider it required for all fighting guns now (unless it is set up for night vision fighting).

    There may be others with this feture but I really, really like the X300 with the DG switch. No fussing with buttons, grab the gun hard enough and the light comes on.

    500 - 1000 is fine for indoors. Maybe don't shine it directly at a mirror, but not too bright. Somewhere around 300 will do fine if on a budget etc.

    The lights will fit on the rail on the dust cover. Some will come with multiple mounting doodads. Dust cover rails are /not quite/ picatinny rails so you need to read instructions and put the right parts on to mount it securely.

    Batteries are just batteries so come out but last a long time because LEDs. Years even with occasional range use. DO understand what batteries the light takes, as I wouldn't be surprised if OLight or someone was using "weird" rechargeables, vs just CR123s, so you'll then have to get the charger, etc.
     
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  12. DustyGmt

    DustyGmt Member

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    Streamlight is a good brand. The Surefire is a little too much money for me. I think maybe a tad overpriced for what you get considering the Streamlights are almost about 1/3 the price but I will say the Surefire is very, very durable. Lawnmower proof in my experience. Still, the streamlight will do the job for alot less money.

    I don't have any experience with Inforce but have heard good things, one of the gun shops close by sells alot of the Inforce lights and says no complaints yet.

    If you're just looking for a good quality weapon light and don't need anything fancy, The TLR-1 is an excellent light for a full size duty weapon like the G17.
     
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  13. Scrod314

    Scrod314 Member

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    Do you remove the light when you go to the range for practice?
     
  14. Navy87Guy

    Navy87Guy Member

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    I’m very happy with the OLIGHT Baldr Mini light/laser combo. I have one on each of my home defense handguns (upstairs and downstairs). They are rechargeable and the charge lasts for many months. 600 lumens is plenty bright in my house, and the laser is great for quick acquisition.

    I also have two OLIGHT Odin Tacticals (on my Bullpup shotgun and my H&K SP5). Same rechargeable feature and shelf life (no laser) but in a rifle mounted format.

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    5B7BA70D-FBD9-48ED-8943-51D81C921820.jpeg
     
  15. JTQ

    JTQ Member

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    I don't have a light on my guns, but if I did, I'd practice with the light mounted. The G17 doesn't have a bad reputation with a mounted light, but the G22 does. It's one of the reasons Glock is on Gen #5, as they try to make their .40 S&W guns work properly.
     
  16. Scrod314

    Scrod314 Member

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    Does the G22 have a bad rep due to the snappiness of the .40 S&W round?
     
  17. JTQ

    JTQ Member

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    The polymer frame has some flex to it. With the light mounted some of that flex went away which affected the function of the guns. I don't know why it didn't affect the other models, but the G22 was a very common LE gun that had a lot of examples in circulation wearing lights.

    First it was the 3 pin design of the Gen 3, then it was some mag spring adjustments, then the Gen 4 with a new recoil spring assembly (which caused problems for the G17 initially), and now the Gen 5 .40 S&W guns that have a heavier slide similar to the .45 GAP guns. Remember, the G17 and G22 were very similar guns when introduced. The base gun was the G17 designed around the 9mm round, the G22 was basically the same gun that got a different barrel.

    Other guns were designed around the .40 S&W round and then modified for the 9mm round. HK USP, Beretta PX4, S&W M&P, etc. It's not limited to Glock. The M9/92FS is a great 9mm shooter. The 96FS shoots fine, but has a reputation for a short life span in .40S&W, because the gun was designed as a 9mm. This is somewhat of the heyday for 92 Series guns, but the only .40 S&W version Beretta offers is the 92A1 that is an odd-ball in the line-up and has a frame buffer.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2021
  18. jeepnik

    jeepnik Member

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    A long time ago folks hand held their lights. Several techniques were taught that involved holding the light away from the body. Why? Because folks tended to shoot at the light. So go right on ahead and mount your light on your gun that you hold head high and in the center of your body. I'll just shoot the light.
     
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  19. shoobe01

    shoobe01 Member

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    Then we get more data. We notice the second order effects, etc. and improve methods. Similar to the 9mm resurgence, because it's /marginally/ worse performing but easier to shoot, more bullet to get hits with so overall effectiveness is better.

    Lights mounted to weapons are quicker, and already aligned with the target, so you shoot them faster and more accurately. Handheld light use is very, very skills dependent, and the best you can hope for is slower and less accurate. The reduced speed (light on, wobble a bit, align gun, align sights, then shoot) gives a LOT of time for the BG to shoot you. Less accuracy means it takes a while for your shots to be effective, and so on with the two building on each other.

    I first learned handheld light methods (before WMLs on even shotguns are SMGs were used by anyone but hostage rescue types) in the early 90s. The neck index and... whatever the far-away-from-the-body method was called, were also-ran techniques for the above reasons. Hard to use. Did several classes with many iterations of Harries, Surefire-Harries, or Chapman if that is what you wanted. So, light near gun trying to get support, recoil control, and get the light aligned with the pistol.

    Also changed is that the state of the art mostly (there are always technique arguments!) is in favor of light ON during the fight, for the same reasons of speed of orienting, etc. above. The goal is to get the fight over fast, and momentary-light-shoot-then-move was not being very effective plus it's hard to move (or remember to move...) in the real world, so actual shooting outcomes were poorer than range time or shoot houses led anyone to believe.
     
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  20. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Sixgun Nut

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    Shooting one handed with a light held away from the body is slow, clumsy and awkward. Have you ever had your eyeballs acclimated to the darkness and someone shine a 600 lumen light in your face? The advantage is theirs, not yours. I have yet to hear an argument against weapon mounted lights that withstood the slightest scrutiny.
     
  21. HPCadm17

    HPCadm17 Member

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    Bright lights and strobes indoors can momentarily disorient an intruder, long enough to give a defender more of an advantage. I use a TLR1 on my Glock 21 Gen4 for HD.
     
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  22. Rexster

    Rexster Member

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    The Glock frame mitigates .40 recoil, quite well. The Gen3 G22 pistols had a bad reputation for malfunctioning, with a WML mounted. Actually, they had a reputation for malfunctioning, even without a WML attached. One of mine was an example of the latter, until I replaced the magazine springs with stronger Wolff springs, at the recommendation of a local armorer. (I had three G22 pistols, because I liked to have a pair, plus, ideally, a spare, of any pistol I used for police duty. So, that was one problematic G22 pistol, among a sample of three.)

    Anyway, you will be using a G17, Gen4, so, should have no worries about functional reliability. I have no experience with any of the TLR-series sights, so cannot comment specifically on them. (I stayed with Surefire, from the original X200, through the X300U-A and X300U-B.) If you plan to holster the pistol, with light mounted, be sure to buy a light that already has holsters ready to use, with it. I transitioned away from my G22 duty pistols, in a quest for better accuracy. I returned to Glocks, when my then-chief OK’ed 9mm duty pistols, as .40’s Snap & Whip was vexing my arthritis. By then, it was Gen4, which fits my hands much better than Gen3. I can attest that the Gen4 G17 is a wonderful weapon, suitable for the Valley of the Shadow of Death.

    Holsters that I like, that are compatible with WMLs, include the Phlster Floodlight, and JM Custom Kydex OWB series. The Floodlight is made to fit the WML, and will accommodate a range of pistols attached to that light. The trade-off for that versatility is more bulk.

    The numbers of lumens that one wants, is going to vary. Not all of us want 1000 lumens of light, for indoor environments, especially in small rooms with white walls and ceilings. I happen to really like the nicely compact, now-discontinued Surefire X200b, which has a rather modest lumen count, by today’s standards.

    OTOH, having 1000+ lumens allows one to better overwhelm an opponent with light, which makes it difficult to return effective, aimed fire, because a massive wall of light allows an opponent no reference point. (To be clear, one does not just stand there, and face incoming fire, as light is not “cover.” There is training, that one should obtain.)

    Notably, a light, mounted on the weapon, is not a substitute for having a really good hand-held light.

    I worked almost 34 years of night shift police patrol, which does not make me an expert, but it does mean that I encountered quite a few situations, over time. I considered it important to have TWO really good hand-held lights, making the WML of tertiary importance. Then, one of our command staff became aware of the existence of WMLs, resulting in an immediate ban on my ability to use a WMLs, for the rest of my career, while in the line of duty. (I could continue to use a WML for home defense, only, as “line of duty” included off-the-clock incidents.) So, most of my actual experience, using WMLs during real-life building searches, was with older Surefire X200 lights.
     
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