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loading buckshot and slugs into economy multi purpose loads

Discussion in 'Shotguns' started by ccsniper, Dec 24, 2012.

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  1. ccsniper

    ccsniper member

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    I recently saw this video on youtube

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SIlmZ_xs45o&list=FLlCtAQsNd6xqHcDi9-QY4Cg&index=5

    The guy takes Federal target loads that come int the 100 round cases and casts the shot inside them into slugs. He "reloads" the shell with the slugs and shoots them in another video. I was wondering is this safe? And if so what about getting a buckshot mold and loading them in there? I figure this is actually safe as long as you keep the weight of the shot the same or under that which you took out. Any thoughts? Is it an inexpensive way to stock buckshot and slugs?
     
  2. lobo9er

    lobo9er Member

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    cant see why it wouldn't be safe theres video on youtube of guys filling shotshells up wi all sorts of things
     
  3. JT-AR-MG42

    JT-AR-MG42 Member

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    Probably should have watched the video.
    No experience with slugs. I do believe the newer Lyman slug mold is designed to be a drop fit in a plastic wad. Seems like a bit of trouble for the result of sub par ballistics on the slug to me.

    9 '00's weigh 1 1/8 oz. Nothing wrong with reloading them to target velocities.

    I don't know how you'll do it with the standard Federal wad that is in the hull though. You will not be able to put the 9 pellets in the hull with the wad petals. They will not nest properly.

    I've messed with cutting the wad petals off and got inconsistent results. I just went back to the card and fiber wads for their predictable patterns.

    With No. 4 buck (forgot to count 1 1/8 oz. worth) you could load the shot cup, but again the load velocity would be more 'show' than 'go'.

    Best bet for buck is to pick up a Lee-Loadall, card and fiber wads, and a can of Herco or Blue Dot.

    My take, JT
     
  4. Sav .250

    Sav .250 Member

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    Safe or not,I`d just buy my buckshot/slug ammo.
     
  5. RaceM

    RaceM Member

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    I do it all the time. Open the petals, dump out the birdshot, refill with round ball and birdshot to equivalent weight, close up the petals and resize the crimp. On loads that won't fill the shot cup at required weight I top off with small poly beads my wife uses to stuff cloth dolls. They shoot fine, and if target loads are all you can find on the shelves it's definitely an option.
     
  6. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Not if you value your time, and add in the expense of a way to melt lead and buy the molds, shotshell reloading press, etc.

    Then even when you get done, you have inferior ammo to what you could have bought already loaded.

    If all you want is practice ammo?
    Just shoot the store bought bird-shot.

    A paper or steel target will never know the difference.

    rc
     
  7. ccsniper

    ccsniper member

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    This is for simple practice mainly with slugs, they being nearly a buck a round I figured this would be the best way to practice with slugs at a lower recoil and less cost.

    I have plenty of store bought stuff, I was just wondering if this might be a good option for maybe self defense in the case I couldn't buy buckshot. Right now nobody has any in my local area, people are just buying all the ammo around.
     
  8. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    IMO: For self-defense?

    If you are close enough to the BG to claim SD?

    A charge of bird-shot in the breadbasket will have him screaming for 911 to come blot his guts up with a sponge and take him to the hospital.

    At any rate, he will stop doing what he was doing to you.

    And that is the whole object of self-defense.

    rc
     
  9. 336A

    336A Member

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    As was already stated up thread just get yourself a Lee Load All they're pretty inexpensive. I'm getting one for Christmas and i'll be doing the same, I'll just need to get the components and I plan on getting the current Lyman shotshell manual.
     
  10. Ditchtiger

    Ditchtiger Member

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  11. ccsniper

    ccsniper member

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  12. ccsniper

    ccsniper member

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    To me, I have seen birdshot do absolutely nothing to too many things at rather close range to bet my life on it. But my main question is this, would doing this be safe? Loading buckshot or slugs into the universal rounds that Federal makes?
     
  13. ccsniper

    ccsniper member

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    I have one cut open in front of me right now with nine 00 buck and they are seating fine?
     
  14. Pete D.

    Pete D. Member

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    Reloads

    As long as the weight of the new load is the same as the one that got dumped out, they will be safe.
    Pete
     
  15. ccsniper

    ccsniper member

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    Thanks this is what I was looking for, I was worried that shifting from birdshot which I suppose compresses slightly from being fired would be less pressure than a solid or larger shot mass. I read that someone said this was a bad idea due to pressure spikes.
     
  16. Uniquedot

    Uniquedot Member

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    Actually the pressure is generally higher with the birdshot than it is when replacing it with buckshot or a slug.
     
  17. Owen

    Owen Moderator Emeritus

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    Is this because of the compression of the shot column pushing into the sides of the wad, increasing friction?
     
  18. leadcounsel

    leadcounsel member

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    So, I'm confused.

    Do you find that normal 00 buckshot or 1oz slugs are ineffective for self defense? What are you trying to accomplish?

    There are specalty loads available at a premium if you think you need something more than 1oz of lead traveling at 1500 fps...

    Personally, I'm quite comfortable in my off-the-shelf buck and slugs.
     
  19. ccsniper

    ccsniper member

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    for economy practice with slugs and buckshot. Or if need be, turning a bunch of birdshot into defense rounds, like right now all the local stores are completely empty of buckshot, though they have slugs.
     
  20. Kymasabe

    Kymasabe Member

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    I wouldn't bother messing with it. I haven't seen the shells you're reloading, but my experience has been, birdshot is usually low-brass and buckshot and slugs are usually high brass. If all you're doing is pulling out the shot and replacing with larger shot, I see no reason why it wouldn't work, but I doubt you'll get the penetration that you'd normally see in a standard buckshot load with high brass and more powder.
    Seems like a waste of time...
     
  21. Pete D.

    Pete D. Member

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    Lo/hi

    Lo brass/ high brass - maybe with factory loads it makes a difference but with reloads, the brass doesn't matter....and then there is the question of how high is high....there is only one low brass hull in this pic....but there is considerable variance.

    [​IMG]
     
  22. ccsniper

    ccsniper member

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    Actually the buckshot would be moving around 1200 feet per second, which is exactly what the low recoil rounds are fired at. So in it would be as effective at the same ranges the low recoil stuff is.
     
  23. Master Blaster

    Master Blaster Member

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    When the manufacturer make shotshells they extensively pressure test their components to make sure they are safe using advanced equipment. When someone screws with a factory load and reloads it like this there is no way to know if it is safe. Store bought rounds are cheaper and safer than experimental loads like this, especially considering the cost of a blown up shotgun and a trip to the emergency room. Over pressure isn't the only risk here, there is also the possibility of sticking a piece of the wad or even the hull in the barrel, and then firing another round, and Kaboom.
     
  24. blarby

    blarby Member

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    It is subjective to how you value your time.

    I'll have to disagree on that one- my buckshot loads are superior to anything else i've tried in terms of long range patterning.... and my 7/8th oz slug loads won't dislocate your shoulder :)

    With that said, I used about 3 #'s of powder, and about 60 pounds of lead to get to where I am.... thats a lot of time in development when you consider the casting, loading, range time, to and fro- etc.

    Good loads don't just fall out of the loadbook... you will need to work at it OP !

    Good advice there ! At hallway distance the wad will probably need to be removed from one or more soft organs :)
     
  25. Uniquedot

    Uniquedot Member

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    I have read a few different explanations in manuals and one of them was that there was more air space between unbuffered buckshot pellets, but that doesn't explain why it's lower with a slug. There is a bit of info on this subject in the 5th edition of reloading for shotgunners, but no clear explanation as to why.
     
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