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Long term storage for reloads

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by CMV, Jan 4, 2012.

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  1. CMV

    CMV Member

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    If I were going to load some ammo to put away, should I do anything differently to it if I wanted to store if for 5-10 yrs?

    Assume it will be stored indoors and loose or on strippers in a GI ammo can.

    Or is that just a bad idea and I should only plan to store commercial ammo?
     
  2. Paladin38-40

    Paladin38-40 Member

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    GI ammo cans OK

    I have shot reloads that were stored indoors, climate controlled, in GI ammo cans 20 odd years with no misfires. Heat and moisture are the what you need to be concerned about. GI ammo cans are well designed to store ammo.
     
  3. HOWARD J

    HOWARD J Member

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    I have pistol ammo reloads stored in basement furnace room in plastic food containers
    ( from dollar store or grocery store) for about 25 years--shoots fine.
    Military rifle ammo in GI ammo can for about 35 years--shoots fine
     
  4. ROCKFISH

    ROCKFISH Member

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    Never had a problem with old ammo (20-30yrs). Even after it turns green, still shoots. I do clean it up a bit so that it cycles properly.
     
  5. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Loaded and clean ammo?

    Zip-Lock freezer bags inside a GI steel ammo can with a good rubber lid seal will last at least the average persons lifetime. Anyway, some of mine have lasted half that long with no end in sight for the ammo.
    Not so much for me though..

    No desiccant packs are necessary, unless you put water in the can with the ammo.

    At least the U.S. Military & I think so.

    rc
     
  6. dickttx

    dickttx Member

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    If you are shooting that caliber, why not just rotate it?
    Last year I cleaned out my reloads from about 40 years ago. Stored under all kinds of conditions in the plastic flip-top boxes. The only ones I had a problem with were .357 in nickel cases. Most of those split when fired.
     
  7. Blue68f100

    Blue68f100 Member

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    The only thing I do is store ammo in foodsaver freezer bags. I figured if it's good enough to keep/store food in, it's good enough for ammo. Now if a flood does hit the ammo it will stay dry for who know how long. Normally loaded ammo does not last very long here.
     
  8. waffentomas

    waffentomas Member

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    I'd probably just seal the primers.

    I gave a friend 200 rounds of ammo, 100 had sealed primers. He dumped them all in a zip-lock and forgot to close it, left his window open and it rained, then it froze all the ammo into a nice block of ammo ice, his son kicked it under the seat, and two months later he finds it all wet and nasty. All the sealed primer ammo fired, and about 75% of the non-sealed primer fired.

    It's the only precaution I'd consider for storing long term.
     
  9. wild willy

    wild willy Member

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    I'd tumble them after loaded then handle them with gloves on. Ziplock bags in ammo cans
     
  10. Old Grumpy

    Old Grumpy Member

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    I've shot plenty of my 20+ year old reloads without problems. Some were in paper boxes and others were in plastic flip-top boxes. As loong as they don't sit in water you should be all right. If you have old GI ammo cans and the rubber seal is in fair condition I'd say they'd be all right for your grandkids to shoot when they have grandkids. That is if the politicians don't take them away from us.
     
  11. oneounceload

    oneounceload member

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    Get the green cans and some small dessicant packs - throw one in the can when closing it and you are good to go for long term
     
  12. atonguis

    atonguis Member

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    +1 Thats what I do
     
  13. Naterater

    Naterater Member

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    If ya wanna go over the top, vacuum seal them with food saver packages. They would have to be good for hundreds of years without air!

    I personally wouldn't but why not?
     
  14. accrhodes

    accrhodes Member

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    I have never had any problems with ammo cans. I find them (50 cal cans) for about 6-8 bucks at the flea market. You really cant go wrong at those prices. Dont buy them online unless you have too. The shipping will be very expensive.
     
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