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Looking for an O/U for occasional clays

Discussion in 'Shotguns' started by rugerdude, Mar 13, 2013.

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  1. cota

    cota Member

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    If you decide on a 101 look carefully at the forearm wood for cracks at the rear of the latch frame, its a common fault and i have had lots of 101s mostly waterfowl models. They can be temperamental on the ejectors too. If you are buying a early one it will be fixed choke or have the old win choke system so be aware of this if you are wanting to shoot any steel at anytime the win chokes are not ideal in my experience.
     
  2. twice barrel

    twice barrel Member

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    Oct 21, 2009
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    Working around skeet ranges in the 1970's I pretty well saw all the o/u's available in the day. The Browning Superposed and Citori's both held up as did the Winchester japanese 101's and Xpert 96's. The Charles Daly's were nice and popular but possessed enertia cocking of the second shot (as did the Brownings) and a miss-fire on the first barrel would not cock the second. You had to solidly thump the butt of the gun to cock the second barrel. I went with the 101's once I saved up enough to get one. Shot thousand's of rounds without a hitch.

    I can say that most doubles of the day had a more rounded firing pin and shorter hammers which sometimes failed to pop a hard primer. The same shell would fire in an 870 or 1100 due to the smaller, sharper firing pin coupled to a more solid hammer strike. Its just a design issue with the guns and some folks avoided double guns because of it.

    I also decided I preferred single, selective triggers, cock both barrels upon opening, and strong ejectors. The 101 fit the bill. Steel shot was not a problem but you did have to live with fixed choked guns until Jess Briley started the quality choke tube thing. I personally prefer fixed chokes when you can get the ones you want.

    Regards,

    TB
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2013
  3. prestpat

    prestpat Member

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    Mar 4, 2012
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    I'd venture to say the 101 is your best bet for what you describe. I've got a friend who shoots between 2 and 6 rounds of trap a week with his (when the weather permits and he's not out of town). That probably works out to around 100-150 boxes per year and I've never known him to have a problem with it.

    If you stumble across a Verona LX 501 (which I believe is made by Rizzini) you might take a look at that too. The local Cabela's had a nice used one earlier this year that I probably would have bought if someone hadn't beat me to it while I was thinking it over. I was quite impressed with the quality for the price point.
     
  4. oneounceload

    oneounceload member

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    Rugerdude - read this - it will most likely give you some info:

    (from)http://www.shotgunworld.com/bbs/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=253741

     
  5. rugerdude

    rugerdude Member

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    Thanks to everyone who gave input that addressed my questions!

    I went to just about every place that sells shotguns here in Tulsa today including a gunshow. I had just about given up on finding a gun with the features I wanted at a price I could pay until I happened to remember a Dick's sporting goods just outside of town.

    They had Franchi Diamond Elites on clearance for 749, and Browning Citori Silver Hunters for 1199. I liked them both but unfortunately the Browning was just out of reach for me, so I went with the Franchi. I had the pick of two and got the one with better-matched wood and a tighter action. I like Franchi shotguns and my semi-auto that I shoot more heavily is a Franchi so I had no qualms about buying another Franchi shotgun.

    Once I get some rounds through her I'll do a write up so that any concerned future buyers can have some information. This one is pretty tight right now, my first priority is to get some gun grease and lube up the internals.

    Any other tips for a brand new O/U?
     
  6. JoeMal

    JoeMal Member

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    Shoot the snot out of it! Congrats on the new gun


    Sent from my Nexus 4 using Tapatalk 2
     
  7. oneounceload

    oneounceload member

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    Degrease it inside and out, then relube/grease per the owner's manual. On O/U hinge pin areas, I prefer a grease like Shooter's Choice (red) or RIG. For lubing extractor/ejectors, I use a light oil. After removing the choke tubes and degreasing them and the barrel threads, use a grease on the threads to keep them from getting stuck while keeping the tubes snug. When you clean after shooting, remove the tubes from the threads and clean the threads inside the barrel and on the tubes - brake cleaner works great for this, then regrease and install

    NEVER shoot a gun that has changeable choke tubes without tubes installed or you risk ruining the barrel threads

    Now go have some fun
     
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