Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Lorcin .380 solution

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by Marksman243, Apr 11, 2013.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Marksman243

    Marksman243 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    I know that about 99.5% of you are going to say chuck it and by a real pistol, but I got it from my friends dad for $25 dollars and I like projects.
    I know the Lorcin .380 is a cheap gun, and made cheaply. I know it's risky to shoot it. But from the pictures and stories I've heard( as well as the guns specs.) seem to indicate that the weakest ( and dangerous) part of the pistol is the slide itself, namely right behind the front sight. Since this part is made from some kind of cheap zinc-steel alloy, I'm pretty confident I you were to CNC a slide out of good 'ol American steel, then that would solve the biggest problem. I know it would cost at least $50 or so, but it's kind of special to me. Does anyone know of anything else(mechanically speaking) that's wrong with the lorcin?
     
  2. gamestalker

    gamestalker member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2008
    Messages:
    9,832
    Location:
    SW Arizona
    I happen to have one that I haven't fired but a couple times. One thing I noticed that was horrible and feels like it is prone to failing, is the trigger system. Mine feels like sand grinding and nearly hangs up when returning. My Son was shooting a friends, it was rather new too, and the slide came flying off the frame. And when firing mine, I've actually thought it was on safe many times, because the trigger pull was so hard, rough, and long. It took everything I could muster to get it to fire.

    Good luck trying to refine and strengthen that piece of junk, please take no offense. I really think that they are one of the most dangerous firearms produced. I also own a couple of el cheapo Hi Point .380's and 9mm boat anchor's that I bought NIB for $100., but at least they don't look or feel like they will fall apart in your hand like the Lorcin.

    GS
     
  3. Marksman243

    Marksman243 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    I know I would be better off just getting another pistol, but I like stuff like this. The thing your talking about I think is the cam. I noticed that the pin on it is shorter than it should be, and this results in it sliding out of the cam, making it impossible to release the firing pin. I think this one is a simple fox though, I'm just going to get a steel rod the same size and cut it down so that it fits perfectly. I have a Jennings nine, but I'm not even going to try and fix it(sear is busted)
     
  4. kim breed

    kim breed Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2012
    Messages:
    97
    At least you can practice some gunsmithing, and learn the operating system
     
  5. rtz

    rtz Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2008
    Messages:
    158
    Location:
    OK
  6. Kiln

    Kiln Member

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2011
    Messages:
    2,465
    The main problem with them is the slide, as you noted in your initial post. Then there are problems with the mags. If you correct the magazine issues they can be made reliable but will most likely have a short lifespan because of a thinly designed zamak slide.

    Cobra firearms actually bought the designs from the Lorcin guns after liability lawsuits shut them down and the former still produces the latter's pistols. Cobra did redesign the slide assembly however to fix the known cracking issue.

    Cobra also makes pistols from Davis (P32, P380, various derringers), Talon industries (steel slides rather than zamak alloy), and Republic Arms.

    Following the link from the above post and asking questions will net you more information. I'm a member there and the guys there have an impressive collective knowlege of cheap pistols.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page