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Low Recoil 45 acp ammo

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by fullauto45, Oct 22, 2007.

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  1. fullauto45

    fullauto45 Member

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    Hi Fellow Shooters,

    I was wondering what is the best low recoil 45 acp ammo for practice and competition. I'm shooting a Springfield Armory XD-45 Tactical. Any help or info would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. CWL

    CWL Member

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    Normally 185gr ammo will have less recoil. But the costs may be considerably more depending on what you mean by "practice & competition".

    Federal 185gr JHP is $350 case delivered from Ammoman.

    Federal 185gr Match is $500 case delivered...

    Standard 230gr ball is $299 case delivered...
     
  3. jaholder1971

    jaholder1971 Member

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    Federal GM 185 FMJ, but it's pricey.
     
  4. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Reload. :D

    Welcome to THR.
     
  5. Ghost Walker

    Ghost Walker Member

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    You want, 'range ammo'. The correct answer is CCI, (aluminum) Blazer ammunition. I usually buy it by the case; it's plenty low recoil, and good enough for things like IDPA matches, too.

    Don't carry it, though. The bullets aren't tightly crimped; the cartridges aren't sealed; the rims are weak; and, Blazers don't stand up well to getting wet.

    Blazer Ammunition
     
  6. StrikeEagle

    StrikeEagle Member

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    I don't really think in terms of factory ammo. With casting and reloading you can get the price down to 3 or 4 cents a round. That's certainly the route I'd take.

    Primers: less than 2 cents each
    Powder: a bit more than a penny a round
    Bullets: Free Wheelweights
    Brass: Free, if scrounged... lasts forever, as far as I can tell

    Something to consider, no?
     
  7. 19-3Ben

    19-3Ben Member

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    Practice up enough to deal with the recoil. The recoil is really not that bad (subjectively), so a few hundred rounds ought to have you more comfortable with it. Ignore me if you have a physical limitation or some other reason to look for low recoil. I'm also not saying it to be snarky and macho. Just trying to give another alternative to accomplish the same objective.
     
  8. 20nickels

    20nickels Member

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    I was in your boat some time ago. I ended up reloading, it is soooo much cheaper after the upfront costs and really not that much work. It seems a bit daunting at first, but you will find much experience here if you just ask/search.
     
  9. Ghost Walker

    Ghost Walker Member

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    Recoil perception is largely subjective. It's also affected by 'How' you grip your pistol, too. I mostly shoot 45 acp or 357 magnum. Once in awhile I'll throw a few 9mm's downrange; but, not all that often.

    It is, all, a matter of what you get used to. A 45 feels like it has more of a push to it. A 40 seems to have a sharp crack reflex; and the 9 feels like a fast light tap to me. You can control recoil by grabbing your semiautomatic pistol at the very top of the backstrap, by keeping your thumbs predominantly straight, by applying a strong backward and downward pressure with your support hand, and by conditioning your reflexes to work, 'in sync' with the gun.

    When I used to shoot a lot of IDPA, I was one of the few on the line who always used a 45. Believe me I never felt handicapped; and that 45 never reduced my scores.

    Watch shooters who fire repetitive strings of shots. You'll often see them go off between the first and second shot before catching the rhythm on the third and any subsequent shots. The only shooters you won't see do this are the ones who fire 100 + rounds each and every day.

    With a semiautomatic pistol the full force of recoil isn't felt until the slide is all the way back. The less, 'pivot' you give to the pistol at that moment the more controllable recoil is going to be. I do a lot of rapid fire work; well, at least, I used to. I've been slacking off recently. I'm aware that my grip actually tightens with a slight downward thrust at the moment the slide is all the way to the rear.

    If you want to control single shots, there's a, 'magic spot' about midway up the pistol's backstrap. The better control you have over this one spot, the better you're going to shoot - Period. To avoid a poor grip, or negative muscle reflexes, I'd recommend dry firing with snap caps. (I keep a magazine full of them in my range bag.) I'll frequently start a range session with 10 or 15 minutes of dry firing because it saves a lot of ammo!

    Another technique you can use while you're learning how to manage recoil is called a, 'ball and dummy drill'. Load several magazines up ahead of time; intersperse your live ammo with a few snap caps. What you discover can be very revealing of your present technique.

    I do not, now, nor ever have practiced with the same ammo that I carry. My practice ammo is always reduced power range ammunition. Sight picture is sight picture; recoil management is recoil management. If you can handle the one, then, you can handle the other. (It's kind of like practicing with a 22 pistol; something I find myself doing more and more of lately.) Once you've developed the skill, it's readily transferable from one lower power factor - one (lesser) caliber - to another higher one.





    PS: Reloading isn't cheaper. That's a myth! Reloaders have the advantage of a very relaxing hobby; they can pick and choose their own personal loads, too; however, I've got an entire room full of reloading equipment that has turned out to be anything but cheap; and, it's taken a long long time to learn how to use it all, well.

    Personally satisfying, educational, convenient, and versatile? Yes! Cheap? Not by a long shot! (And ya got 'a learn to love it, if you're going to spend the time required to keep up with your other hobby.)
     
  10. jonboynumba1

    jonboynumba1 Member

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    reloads!

    Lasercast/OT 200gr SWC 4.1gr Unique -my light load

    Feels great and will work even with a 18.5# spring knocks steel good to...5gr Unique even better...very clean shooting to (either one)!
     
  11. Surefire

    Surefire Member

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    Agree.

    I've never met a .45 acp that had recoil other than light to mild.

    .45 +p loads can be a little on the moderate side, as is shooting standard .45acp from a pocket gun like an amt backup.

    If one has an injury that that magnifies recoil, that is a different matter.

    The best practical bet is probably the cheap target ball ammo built for target shooting--its going to have lower recoil than defense loads. Either that or try reloading. Good luck...
     
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