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M1 Garand serial number range affecting value?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by AirPower, Jul 20, 2007.

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  1. AirPower

    AirPower Member

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    Just wondering if SN of M1 Garand affect its value? Mine's from 250,xxx range and some one told me it's pretty early gun. does it have higher value than comparable rifle but of 1.5M range? Thanks.
     
  2. RustyHammer

    RustyHammer Member

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    It was made in June, 1941.

    Condition more than serial number is the general rule of thumb, however, five-digit and below are very hard to come by and command a better price.

    Do you have any pictures?
     
  3. jefnvk

    jefnvk Member

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    In my book, it may command a small premium ($50-100 max)

    I had a 41 and a 45 IIRC up for sale at the same time. Go more out of the 45 cause of condiiton
     
  4. Neo-Luddite

    Neo-Luddite Member

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    That is an early one in some respects--what that means is something else entirely. I have one from '44 and one from '55--they are both very special to me; But both part of the larger family---one of the most very important families in the shooting world.

    A few dollars, more or less, depending on condition and wear and tear.

    And who cares? It's a ----ing M-1.

    THAT is what counts.

    Love it, never sell it... and YOU WON'T CARE!!!
     
  5. akolleth

    akolleth Member

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    Some people want the lower ranges because of the historical significance. One from 1941 almost certainly saw service somewhere in WWII, maybe even a good chance actual front line service.
     
  6. cdrt

    cdrt Member

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    Early numbers are good, but according to Canfield's book on the M1, more importently would be matching parts and a rifle that had not necessarily gone through an arsenal rework. Something very hard to find on an M1 from 1941 since it probably has a mixture of parts and has been reworked more than once. Still, all in all, any M1 is bringing a good price these days.

    I was at Camp Perry last week and saw the 200 or so rifles the CMP had for sale in the rack grade for $495 plus tax. Most had shot out barrels, etc. but there was standing room only to get a look at them and very few were left after the first couple of days. And most of the stocks looked like they had been run over by a tank.
     
  7. cracked butt

    cracked butt Member

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    The only part of an M1 that has a serial number is the receiver. Everything else has drawing numbers on it. The drawing number refers to the blueprint drawing for that particular part. Having the correct drawing numbers, manufacturer stamps, and correct correct stock for a particular year a rifle was made is a plus to some collectors, but there is no way of knowing whether the rifle was retired from service in that condition or if someone trying to 'improve' their collection or rifle has swapped parts from other rifles or bought 'correct' parts off ebay.
     
  8. cdrt

    cdrt Member

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    What I was referring to, albeit not very well, is the fact that later parts do not have drawing numbers on them. If you have an early rifle, all the parts should have drawing numbers. If any are not numbered, they would be replacement parts. My Winchester M1 from 1944 had all the correct part numbers execept for the op rod which had SA markings on it.

    You can tell when some numbered parts were manufactured, because they would add dashes and a number to show when a part had been modified. It's not very precise, since sometimes they would add just the revision dash number like 0 or 1. My reference on this is Canfield's book, pages 19-20.
     
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