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Magnum?

Discussion in 'Shotguns' started by ZVP, Feb 14, 2013.

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  1. ZVP

    ZVP Member

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    Is a 2 3/4", High brass, 1oz, #4 considered a Magnum load?
    I would think "if" such a load makes the claimed 1220fps mark, then such a Field Load should r called a Magnum!
    ANyway, just whst does s losd have to do to be called a "Magnum".
    ZVP
     
  2. Xfire68

    Xfire68 Member

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    The brass height has nothing to do with anything on shot shells.

    The data in some of my manuals lists 1oz "Magnum" loads moving at 1320 fps and light Field and Target loads in the 1150-1250 fps range.
     
  3. Steve C

    Steve C Member

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    In shotshells the term "magnum" generally refers to shells containing a heavier load or shot with velocity at the shotgun maximum of 1,400 fps for lead. Years ago I loaded "baby magnums" or 2-3/4" shells with 1-5/8oz shot in a Blue Versalite wad and AA shell. Haven't seen those wads for sale for a long time but they where great for ducks and geese in the day one could still use lead.

    Today one finds lead magnum "Pheasant loads" in 2-3/4" shells with 1-1/4 oz or 1-3/8 oz loads.
     
  4. Virginian

    Virginian Member

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    I have not seen a factory "Magnum" labelled load of less than 1-3/8 ounces in 2-3/4", or with a 3" case length. It's been a very long time since I have seen any of the 2-3/4" stuff. Magnum refers to a heavier charge of shot than what was before that considered "normal", but I have never seen velocity tied into the equation. For all those who take issue, please post a picture of the box. I'm always ready to learn.
     
  5. ZVP

    ZVP Member

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    So my Remington Phesant 1 oz load is not a Magnum, but just a field load.
    Thanks
    ZVP
     
  6. Uniquedot

    Uniquedot Member

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    As has been mentioned magnum referred to the extra shot in the load and magnum loads were almost always slower than even standard field loads. About 15 or so years ago manufacturers started moving away from the standard and started producing "magnum" loads with less than the usual weight of shot in their premium lines and raised the velocity.

    That would be a high velocity field load.
     
  7. 303tom

    303tom member

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    Unlike magnum centerfire rifle cartridges, which are usually faster than standard cartridges, magnum shotshells of all gauges are often slower than regular field loads. Use of the word magnum in shotshell terminology refers to a heavier shot charge and not necessarily an increase in speed. As examples, Remington's 12-gauge 2 3/4-inch Premier Magnum turkey load has 1 1/2 ounces of shot and a 1260 fps muzzle velocity rating while Remington's standard Game Load delivers 1/4 ounce less shot but is rated at a quicker 1330 fps. Moving on up in payload size, respective shot charge weights of the Premier Magnum loadings of the three-inch and 3 1/2-inch 12-gauge Magnum shells are two and 2 1/4 ounces respectively while their muzzle velocities are only 1175 and 1150 fps respectively. It all has to do with the maximum chamber pressures within which the ammunition makers must work, and when light and heavy shot charges are loaded to the same pressures, the latter will be lower in velocity.
     
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