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Makes a Buck 110 look tiny (ish)

Discussion in 'Non-Firearm Weapons' started by AuthorityDenied, Dec 10, 2011.

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  1. AuthorityDenied

    AuthorityDenied Member

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    Just picked up this Spyderco Resilience. It is a monster indeed.

    IMAG0471.jpg

    Here it is next to the Spyderco Ladybug I picked up for my lady friend

    IMAG0469.jpg
     
  2. Deltaboy1984

    Deltaboy1984 Member

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    Big Folder.
     
  3. Fred Fuller

    Fred Fuller Moderator Emeritus

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    Wow. That's definitely the 'big brother' of the family. I'm carrying a Tenacious... be interesting to see a size comparison shot with that one.

    How do you like the full flat grind on a blade that long and that wide?
     
  4. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    While not the longest mass market production folder, it is the largest Spyderco folding knife at 4.25". The knife feels good in the hand, the balance is great. I'd like to see one of their newer locks on it and some other steel options.
     
  5. Tirod

    Tirod Member

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    It's the one I take when a longer blade is necessary.

    As for needing a better steel, it's common as blade lengths go up, alloys go down. Two factors - cost and fabrication of a tougher, harder to work blade starts driving expense up, it seems adding one more inch makes the blade twice as expensive. It certainly takes longer to shape, and a flaw late in finishing loses more in work in progress expense.

    Second, bigger blades don't necessarily warrant a harder to sharpen blade. They get a lot more chopping, and rougher cuts on larger media. Fine work that needs a thin scapel like precision cut isn't their forte. The type steel should have more shock resistance for getting beat on, not a high hardness thin edge that is more likely to chip than roll over. Sharpening it back shouldn't take a benchtop diamond stone, either - it's a field knife, and may likely only see a medium grit rod to touch up for the weeks duty.

    If Spyderco did go that route, I would expect American manufacture, an S30V blade, and about $120 - not the affordable monster I have. I've got a S30V knife already - and it's a royal pain to get back to an edge, something to schedule for a long snowy Sunday afternoon, not a quick touchup. That's the plus for the Resilience, it's a user that maintains easily and carries better than a fixed blade in a sheath.
     
  6. Owen Sparks

    Owen Sparks member

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    You can do just about anything with a big knife that you can with a small knife but not vice-versa.
     
  7. dayhiker

    dayhiker Member

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    Wrong. Just takes a different technique and skill set.
     
  8. sixgunner455

    sixgunner455 Member

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    Geez. I've got a Tenacious, and thought I was carrying a good-sized folder.
     
  9. Sniper X

    Sniper X Member

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    I would say first cool Spyderco, then add to the discussion about big knife small knife. You can do ALMOST everything (with the proper technique) with a big knife that you can with a small one, but you can't do everything with a small knife that you can with a big one. Of course this is relative because I am talking round the camp chores like chopping and such....:D
     
  10. dayhiker

    dayhiker Member

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    OP.........great knife by the way.






    Your right, I can't chop with a little knife.

    I can baton notches around the diameter of a piece of wood to make it two pieces though.

    100_1834.jpg


    100_1835.jpg

    100_1836.jpg


    Doesn't take all that long to do, but I would prefer a chainsaw.:)
     
  11. AuthorityDenied

    AuthorityDenied Member

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    Thanks guys. I've been using it as my primary blade for edc with a Leek and a SAK Super tinker as backup blades. It carries very well for its size, and with the milled out liners is pretty lightweight. It's a heck of a blade for $38
     
  12. Sniper X

    Sniper X Member

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    Of course I could have had that log in half in about three chops with my Hoodlum!:D:neener:
     
  13. kozak6

    kozak6 Member

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    How difficult is it to release? How sharp are those little teeth on the liner? How far over does the liner go?

    I've been thinking hard about getting one of these, but have some reservations since it's a liner lock.
     
  14. Sav .250

    Sav .250 Member

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    Cool looking but I`ll stick with my .....110. As in most cases ,it`s all the knife I need.
     
  15. sixgunner455

    sixgunner455 Member

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    Kozak -

    I'm ASSuming that it is similar to my Tenacious, just bigger, so I'll say that the liner lock works smoothly, and the teeth are really just enough to give you something to feel and have some friction against when you press against it. On mine, it goes over about halfway across the blade.

    The relief cut on the G10 scale and opposite liner is what gives you access to the lock.
    The liners are steel, and these are quite stoutly built. It's less than $40 bucks for any of the blades in this line, no matter where you get it, so you really can't go wrong, just pick your size and give one a try. I think you'll be pleased.

    Mine is the best built Chinese-made pocket knife I've seen. I like it a lot.
     
  16. AuthorityDenied

    AuthorityDenied Member

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    The lock is easy to release without being flimsy, and he jimping (sp?) On the liner lock give you plenty of traction. It is just about dead center on the tang of the blade.
     
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