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Marlin 1895 Reloading Question

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by mako8551, Oct 4, 2010.

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  1. mako8551

    mako8551 Member

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    My once fired 45-70 brass has expanded out of "factory Spec" After full length resizing they are all about .010 or less too long.

    My question is the resized brass chambers fine and being an Rimmed cartridge doesn't the chamber head space off of the rim? So wouldn't it be safe to get 1 more firing out of them before I have to break out the case trimmer?

    Also what is average case life for 45-70 hotter hunting rounds?

    Using 40gr IMR 4227 pushing a 300 gr Barnes X bullet out of a new production Marlin SBL.
     
  2. Fleet

    Fleet Member

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    Yes, they may chamber fine. A 45/70 always headspaces off of the rim, no matter what. The problem you'll have is crimping. Varying case lengths means that the case mouth won't always be in the same position on the bullet relative to the crimping groove or cannelure. If you adjust your seating die to provide the correct crimp on one round, it may (and probably will) be off on the second, or third and so on.

    As to "hotter" hunting rounds, you'll have to provide a definition of what that means.
     
  3. Ridgerunner665

    Ridgerunner665 Member

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    You should trim it...

    I trim mine to 2.095" when its brand new (open the bag, resize it, flare the mouth, trim it)...after firing they measure 2.085"...resize and they are back to 2.095".

    And I don't mean to sound like a know it all or anything...but you're using all the wrong powder...4227 produces way too much pressure with way too little velocity (its too fast)

    Case life depends on loads...I load my 1895 to 38,000 psi (35,000 CUP), and my brass splits the necks before they get anywhere near head separation. I do believe in heavy crimps for lever guns.

    For 300 grain bullets...I'd invest in some H4198 or AA2230.
     
  4. Maj Dad

    Maj Dad Member

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    +1 on the 4198 (I use IMR), also 3031. My 1895 will put 5 300gr JH/SPs into 1" at 100 yds, year after year with ~53-55 gr 3031. I also trim them after each firing out of habit, and relegate them to trap door use after 3 hot firings. I am still shooting brass in the trap door that I bought at Ft Bragg in 1974 (admittedly not every weekend, but the low pressure loads are easy on it). I have also annealed the necks along the way and that may have helped avoid splits.
     
  5. Asherdan

    Asherdan Member

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    This is what I do as well. I have 87 of 100 pieces of R-P brass that I've gotten 3 hot and 12+ trapdoor level reloads with. The primer pockets are finally starting to get suspicious.

    I would not leave the brass long and I would trim back to 2.095".

    I was wondering about 4227 as well...the suggestions of some flavour of 4198 is a good one. Personally, I like H4198 or Rx7 for the 300 grain bullets.
     
  6. mako8551

    mako8551 Member

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    I do get a very very small amount of primer flow from this loading. The max is listed as 41.5gr IMR 4227 in the new Barnes reloading manual. Rated safe only for 1895 and Ruger #1.

    The Barnes manual didn't list many powder options and the IMR 4227 was the only listed powder in stock. It groups well but it does seem to be on the edges of the safe range. I will be sure to pick up some IMR 4198 when I get a chance.
     
  7. zeke

    zeke Member

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    Have taken to using Lee dies for resizing the brass for lever rounds, as they seem to resize the case closer to spec (as compared to some RCBS or Redding dies i tried). 375,45-70, 444, 30-30, 25-20 and 32-20. This significantly reduced the case stretching during resizing, while maintaining neck tension. Or you ckeck/adjust your die to resize adequately for the chamber, but being caeful of neck tension.
     
  8. dodge

    dodge Member

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    Depends on what brass you're using. Is it Hornady or some other brand? I have found that Hornady brass is about 1/10" shorter than Remington or Starline and won't crimp no matter what die you're using unless you have a Lee crimp die.
     
  9. SASS#23149

    SASS#23149 Member

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    upon firing brass that is too long cannot expand into the chamber as it's supposed to.could create a pressure spike.
    I"m no expert but i've read this many many times and it makes sense to me.
    when u say it's long,are u talking as compared to 'trim to ' lenght,or nominal length ?
     
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