Marlin 30-30

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by PND, Oct 9, 2021.

  1. PND

    PND Member

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    Ok guys, looking to id my Marlin Model 36 30-30. Based on what little I have found, it has to be a 1945 or 1946 manufacturing date. This was my first hunting rifle waaaay back. About 60 years ago was the last time I fired it. My bore gage shows it has extremely little wear in the barrel. Finish on the stock is pretty worn off so thinking of getting the last bit of varnish off and giving it a good coating of boiled linseed oil. What can you tell me about it.
     

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  2. Coyote3855
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    Coyote3855 Contributing Member

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    It's a Model 36-A. Should have a 24 inch barrel and a half magazine. According to this website, the small "c" indicates manufacture in 1946. Pictures of entire rifle would be helpful.

    There is a product called Birchwood Casey Tru Oil that works much better than straight BLO, in my opinion. You can buy just the Tru Oil or a kit with stain, Tru Oil, and Stock Sheen for the final finish. Multiple coats give a great protective finish on a wooden stock. Yes, remove all the existing finish first.

    The Model 36 was an improvement over the Model 1893/93 and was followed by the Model 336 in 1948.

    What else do you want to know?
     
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  3. ClaymoreAKM

    ClaymoreAKM Member

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    Wow! That's got to be pre-microgooving!
     
  4. HowieG

    HowieG Member

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    Well, yeah, considering Marlin introduced microgroove in 1953.
     
  5. HowieG

    HowieG Member

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    If you want more of a flat finish, you might try a tung oil urethane mix.
     
  6. PND

    PND Member

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    Opps! I be bad. Here is the rest of the rifle. Wasn't sure if the "c" was upper or lower case. Not sure what you mean "micogooving"? The sights are obviously not original but sure make it easier to hit what your shooting at. In all the pictures I have found, I didn't see any with the shorter magazine. Good to know it is a "half" magazine. Thanks for all the information.
     

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    earlthegoat2 likes this.
  7. Riomouse911

    Riomouse911 Member

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    That’s a nice looking 36, you kept it preserved very well :thumbup:. Once you refinish the stock it’ll look like it did 75 years ago. :)

    Stay safe.
     
  8. tachelberry

    tachelberry Member

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    It looks like a sporting carbine. I have 2 of them but mine are a bit older as they are the old 93 model. The model 36, is as already indicated, the same basic rifle with a few improved modifications. The sporting carbines are are lightweight and a pleasure to carry. Many of these had case colored receivers and are very attractive rifles.
     
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  9. GooseGestapo

    GooseGestapo Member

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    DON’T touch that stock!
    Wipe it down with a little Kroil on a rag. And leave it alone.
    Removing the original finish will ruin collector value.
    The sights add character to it and also enhance value.
    Leave it “as is” and SHOOT IT!

    Join marlinowners.com and post pics there. They REALLY appreciate an older Marlin.
     
  10. Krusty

    Krusty Member

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    Marlin Year of Manufacture

    Marlin year of manufacture maybe determined from the following list of letter/numeral prefixs to the serial number; this coding only applies to serialized rifles:

    1946-C
    1947-D
    1948-E
    1949-F
    1950-G
    1951-H
    1952-J
    1953-K
    1954-L
    1955-M
    1956-N
    1957-P
    1958-R
    1959-S
    1960 (August)-1961-U
    1961 (August)-1962-V
    1963-W
    1964-Y,-Z
    1965-AA
    1966-AB
    1967-AC
    1968-AD, -68
    1969-69
    1970-70
    1971-71
    1972-72


    I believe this is correct. Nice rifle op.
     
  11. Coyote3855
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    Coyote3855 Contributing Member

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    OP says most of the original finish is missing. If he intends to keep the rifle, collector value may not be relevant to his decision. I'm all for patina and originality but also believe the owner of a firearm should do what he wants with it. I'd refinish the stock. YMMV.
     
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  12. GooseGestapo

    GooseGestapo Member

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    Pics didn’t look that bad! Take a look.
    I’d just give them a wipe as stated. They look fine to me.
    I got four replies to my post. Three LIKES, one naysayer.
    I’m with the “likes”!
     
  13. Roverguy

    Roverguy Member

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    That’s a good looking rifle in a very attractive configuration. I had Glenfield in a similar config, but it had the very objectionable pressed Birch stocks and got moved on. I can see why you have hung onto this one.
     
  14. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    I agree. Clean it up, but don't try to refinish it. Leave it as is. I MIGHT go along with a complete refinish of wood and metal done by someone who is a pro. Any DIY project on that rifle will really hurt the value.

    Those were considered a rifle, not a carbine. Actually barrel length has nothing to do with it. It is the end cap at the end of the fore end that makes it a rifle. If it had a barrel band it would be considered a carbine. They made rifles with short barrels and they are known as "short rifles". They made longer barreled carbines and they are known as carbines because they had barrel bands instead of an end cap.

    The original 336A rifle with a 24" barrel and end caps are not common and worth a premium. Later, starting in the 1980's Marlin also labeled a rifle as a 336A, but it was their cheaper budget gun.
     
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