Marlin announcement from Ruger

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by ECVMatt, Jul 17, 2021.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. mjsdwash

    mjsdwash Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2011
    Messages:
    2,010
    While I love my Rugers, I have bought 4, and have to say my 1989 GP was the best.
    My 2007era 10/22 came with a defective extractor, that caused many malfunctions.
    My Standard MK3, from 2008 had the same extractor defect, and the LCI caused multiple out of battery firings.
    My NM Vaquero from around 2005 has pins that float 1/8" side to side, and I put rubber O rings in to keep them in place. It also has some parts that went straight from casting to sale.
    That said, I still have them all, still love them all, and they shoot great. But 3 new production firearms, and each has issues is not a good sign.

    I will say, maybe the Taurus fin/finish was as good as Ruger, but I bet the metallurgy, and blue-print adherence was far behind.
     
    LoonWulf and TarDevil like this.
  2. mjsdwash

    mjsdwash Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2011
    Messages:
    2,010
    it'll be like when Coke and Diet Coke beat out Pepsi as the most popular brand's.
     
    qwert65, WisBorn and LoonWulf like this.
  3. Ranger99

    Ranger99 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2021
    Messages:
    285

    It was actually one of 2 Nikon 35 mm
    SLRs I have, the day was extremely
    foggy and damp and drizzly so the photo
    was less than optimal
    Anyway, I went to kill a deer and not for
    photo opportunities
     
  4. Elkins45

    Elkins45 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2009
    Messages:
    5,950
    Location:
    Northern KY
    I can’t imagine why they would want to bring back a gun to compete with one they are already making.

    Besides, as the owner of both a Camp Carbine and a PC Carbine I think the Ruger is the superior design. The Camp Carbine is prone to all sorts of failure modes even after replacing the deteriorated original buffer.
     
  5. Dustbowl

    Dustbowl Member

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2018
    Messages:
    204
    They’ll bring lever guns at a decent price point to bring the heat on Henry then bring out the other stuff later. The main competitor for new Marlins is Henry and they’ll want to command back that lost market share when Remington collapsed. Because say what you want about “The lever gun is dead,” Henry has made their entire company off them and Marlin was obviously selling enough of them to be bought out twice.

    As for Wish list I say they should bring back the short throw levermatics for the Rimfire stuff.
     
  6. R.W.Dale

    R.W.Dale Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2005
    Messages:
    11,558
    Location:
    Northwest Arkansas
    Ruger will field the marlin name but none of their designs lend themselves to modern manufacturing.

    The upcoming rifles will likely be fantastic guns but will probably only have a passing resemblance to a marlin.
     
    Mr. Mosin, ThomasT and WisBorn like this.
  7. KsSkaEnthusiast

    KsSkaEnthusiast Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2020
    Messages:
    132
    If ruger brings the model 60 back for less than 200 my wallet will start quivering.
     
    adcoch1 and WisBorn like this.
  8. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Sixgun Nut

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2006
    Messages:
    20,627
    Location:
    West Tennessee
    They're going to be built with the brand new CNC machinery Ruger got when they bought Marlin. :confused:
     
  9. JCooperfan1911

    JCooperfan1911 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2020
    Messages:
    1,266
    Hope I didn't offend, it was in jest. Nice rifle and Bambi.
     
    Demi-human and chicharrones like this.
  10. Charlie98

    Charlie98 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2017
    Messages:
    4,834
    Location:
    McKinney, TX
    Just like your anecdotal story...

    Not true, either.

    Post a question about 'Thinking about buying a Ruger Blackhawk' and see the responses you get. About 75% of them will be positive... I know, I've read them.

    For what it's worth, I've probably owned as many S&W revolvers as Rugers... the Smiths were simply better built pistols, but that is not to say I haven't had my share of problems with them, either... S&W's QC has been out to lunch a few times, too. Firearms are simply mechanical devices built by humans. It's true, I've had terrible luck with Ruger pistols... and I'm not alone... but I'm also willing to admit they have built good pistols, too... they would likely not still be in business otherwise. There are still 2 or 3 Ruger revolvers on my List... and I know if I buy one it will be a 50/50 chance I actually get a pistol that does not require work.
     
    qwert65 and GooseGestapo like this.
  11. mcb

    mcb Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    Messages:
    5,584
    Location:
    North Alabama
    I would almost guarantee the 1894, 1895 and 336 will be back with little or not change from Marlin/Remington versions. They are not hard to make, Remington had done a fair amount of work to transition from old single op machining that Marlin has used to CNC machining centers for most of the major components and Ruger acquired most of that equipment, unfortunately none of the operators or engineers that has done that translation. The easy path to market for Ruger with Marlin is simple stand those machines up and start making those original Remlins. The time line to bring a completely new design to market is considerable longer if they are really going to test it.
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2021
    qwert65 likes this.
  12. R.W.Dale

    R.W.Dale Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2005
    Messages:
    11,558
    Location:
    Northwest Arkansas
    and the market hated the rifles made this way and universally rejected them at the price point needed to make them

    don’t forget about that part. Ruger isn’t going to make Remingtons mistakes
     
  13. mcb

    mcb Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    Messages:
    5,584
    Location:
    North Alabama
    Many hated them because of Remington's QC and the fact it took them over 7 years to get Marlin production ramped to acceptable QC levels not because of the rifles themselves or the manner in which they where manufactured. And right before the second bankruptcy Remington had Marlin figured out pretty well and the guns were selling like hot cake even in the post Trump slump. It was one of the few things Remington could successfully sell. They could not make the Marlin Dark series fast enough. If everything has been selling for Remington as well at the Remlins the company probably could have avoided the second bankruptcy.

    I would be willing to bet that we will see 1894, 1895, & 336 before we see anything else from Ruglin...
     
  14. Dale Alan

    Dale Alan Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2017
    Messages:
    890
    How do you know this as fact ? When I see the word "Likely" it concerns me about actual facts .
     
  15. Tirod

    Tirod Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2008
    Messages:
    5,139
    Location:
    SW MO
    A spiral mag in 6.8SPC lever gun would be nice.
     
    NR53 and troy fairweather like this.
  16. R.W.Dale

    R.W.Dale Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2005
    Messages:
    11,558
    Location:
    Northwest Arkansas
    And how do you know it isn’t

    what firearms does ruger make that involves complicated broaching and machining of the receiver? Vs the investment casting processes they’ve been famous for pioneering
     
  17. TarDevil

    TarDevil Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    Messages:
    1,928
    Location:
    NC Coast
    Exactly. Glad you get it.
    Did you think I was differing with you?
     
    Hooda Thunkit likes this.
  18. Elkins45

    Elkins45 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2009
    Messages:
    5,950
    Location:
    Northern KY
    I hope they continue with the recent trend of threaded muzzles.
     
  19. RedlegRick

    RedlegRick Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2017
    Messages:
    687
    Perhaps if they combine the salient features of both and correct the buffer issue the Camp Carbine has they might have a winner. Bonus points if they make adapters for all the major brands, too.
     
  20. WisBorn

    WisBorn Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2020
    Messages:
    1,465
    Location:
    South Carolina
    Do you like to install cans or breaks?
     
  21. ColoradoMinuteMan

    ColoradoMinuteMan Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2015
    Messages:
    515
    Exactly, Henry is making ~250,000 rifles a year and I doubt many of those are AR-7s. Henry is in the top handful of rifle makers in the USA by numbers produced. This is certainly evidence in opposition of "the lever gun is dead."
     
    qwert65 and WisBorn like this.
  22. Charlie98

    Charlie98 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2017
    Messages:
    4,834
    Location:
    McKinney, TX
    No... not at all... I have thicker skin than that. ;) Everyone's true experience with anything is just their perspective... based on their own experience. I probably took more of an issue with Craig's comments, assuming I'm taking them in context, that Ruger never kicks out a substandard firearm... because he's owned 80 of them. While I don't doubt for a fact that it's true... based on what he's said... my view, based on my own experience and my expectations, with about 8 Ruger revolvers over the past 35 years, has not been his experience. That's all.
     
  23. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Sixgun Nut

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2006
    Messages:
    20,627
    Location:
    West Tennessee
    I stand by my statements. Ruger has never been the pinnacle of fit & finish, which is why I have always thoroughly inspected new guns, regardless of manufacturer, before filling out the 4473. In fact, Ruger has improved a lot about their revolver production in the last 10-15yrs. You won't hear much chatter about improvements but the slightest little finish issue and it's the end of the world. There's a guy posted pictures of his new Ruger on a Facebook group last week. bawling about how bad it is. I still can't figure out what he's talking about. IMHO, the internet makes things seem worse than they are and I also think there are a lot of uninformed consumers.


    Where did I say that? I've had a Ruger turd, one so bad that it had to be scrapped and replaced. I never said they never make turds.


    False. As I said earlier, the JM guns weren't all that great to begin with. People speak as if they are but it always baffles me. They were always more crudely machined, fitted and finished than their Winchester counterparts. The newer Remington guns, if don't right like my 1895, are head and shoulders above the old JM guns.


    The one area that has almost always been broached is the raceway for the hand/pawl. Even Colt doesn't do that any more. Why? Because EDM works better. Where do you get this idea that cast frames don't require machine work??? Have you actually looked at a raw casting as compared to a raw forging? Not much difference.
     
    Demi-human, czhen and GooseGestapo like this.
  24. MachIVshooter
    • Contributing Member

    MachIVshooter Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2005
    Messages:
    17,076
    Location:
    Elbert County, CO
    That's a curious statement.

    Do you think other manufacturers of Lever rifles and other 19th century designs are banging out forgings on power hammers and cutting on line shaft machines with steel tooling?

    CNCs don't care what they're making. They easily interpolate shapes that are done by forming and special fixturing on manual equipment with fewer tools, fewer operators and in far less time. A modern high speed 5+ axis VMC can turn a chunk of 4140 into a Marlin receiver faster than you can read all the replies in this thread.
     
  25. Mosin77

    Mosin77 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2019
    Messages:
    556
    Complicated machining isn’t as complicated when you have a CNC line and modern machines all set up. Which is what Ruger bought and what Remington spent a few years setting up from the ground up.

    The labor and expense is in the hand-fitting which is necessary to get a truly nice level of finish and function when machining parts by hand on old single-process machines. This was necessary to some degree with the old JM Marlin line, because those guns were made by experienced operators who knew the tricks to get maximum performance out of old and worn machines. So if Ruger used that process… Marlin would not be coming back. But using Remington’s process would be a different story. I’d think it would be a great deal more expensive to re-engineer them for the customary Ruger methods.
     
    Demi-human, Mr. Mosin and CraigC like this.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice