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Maryland mental health and buying guns

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by evilelvis, Sep 22, 2008.

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  1. evilelvis

    evilelvis Member

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    My fiance and I have been seeing a counselor for premarriage counseling. We picked someone at random in a phone book. Silly me for whatever reason I gave them my insurance card but told them not to use it however much to my irritation I received a letter from my insurance with an explanation of benefits - I now have a lovely 3 entries for "psychotherapy services".

    This was voluntary marriage counseling...but now I am wondering about the issue with the mental health form I need to sign in MD to purchase a regulated firearm.

    I know I know I am being paranoid...but how paranoid is the question? I just don't want this to reflect on any background checks.
     
  2. kingpin008

    kingpin008 Member

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    You're fine. What they're looking for are people who have been adjudicated (court-ordered) to mental health facilities. In your case, you and your girl voluntarily went for counseling, which is not the same as mental health treatment. No worries.

    And just out of curiosity, where in MD are you? (if you don't mind me asking)
     
  3. evilelvis

    evilelvis Member

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    Frederick County...
     
  4. 4D5

    4D5 Member

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    Don't blame you for the fear...

    My ex-wife is, so appropriately named by my late dad a "brain shrinker" :what:
    I know first hand how these twisted psychologists think and it's damm scary.

    That's why I'd NEVER EVER talk with a brain shrinker :eek: I'ts like going to court, no good can ever come from it and it will cost you a s***t load of $$$.

    Nothing may never come of it by why take the chance :scrutiny:

    Like I use to tell my ex-wife, we d**m sure didn't see a brain shrinker getting in this mess and I d**m sure not going to see a brain shrinker to undo the mess.
     
  5. kingpin008

    kingpin008 Member

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    See, that's the thing. Unless you make statements that express a desire or plan to harm yourself or others, psychiatrists and psychologists really can't (and won't) do anything that would result in having your rights in regards to firearm use and ownership revoked. I see a shrink, and I made it clear to her at the beginning that I wasn't that comfortable telling her certain things (both about my gun ownership and other issues) and she flat-out told me that unless I was making statements like I mentioned above, her hands were tied even if she did want to screw me over.

    So, if the counseling sessions are helping you and your woman maintain your relationship, go for it. Some people seem to think that all they have to do is make a phone call and *poof!* your rights are gone. It's just not true.
     
  6. ColinthePilot

    ColinthePilot Member

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    I don't even know anymore
    I would usually give the same advice I give to most natives of my home state, but in this case, leaving MD, like I did, won't help. You can't buy guns anywhere if you've been adjudicated mentally defective.
    So, back to the topic. You're not crazy, and I agree with Kingpin that I don't think they're legally allowed to disclose anything you tell them unless you're going to harm yourself or others.
    I also agree with 4D5 that I would have no reason to talk to a shrink. They think you have a problem, and if you claim you don't, then you're in denial about your problem...circular reasoning at its finest. I've heard of the pre-marriage counseling, but every time I've encountered it, it was done by a member of the clergy. I wasn't aware that it was available in non-religious form.
    Either way, good luck with your future gun purchases and future marriage.
     
  7. kingpin008

    kingpin008 Member

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    And something else I noticed in re-reading the OP's post - if you're being billed for "psychotherapy" services, you're not seeing a psychiatrist or a psychologist - you're seeing a psychotherapist. Knowing that, you have even less to worry about - psychotherapy isn't the same as the others, just like a chiropractor isn't a doctor. Knowing that, you're in even less danger (is there a lesser danger rating than "none"?) than before.
     
  8. LongHairedHippy

    LongHairedHippy Member

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    you're somewhat incorrect. While a person administering psychotherapy is indeed a psychotherapist, they can also be a psychologist or a psychiatrist. no degree is needed to be a psychologist, technically speaking. However, Psychiatrists are MDs, and have been through the same requisite post-graduate education that your family physician went through, and they are also allowed to prescribe you drugs. OP: I currently see both a psychologist and a psychiatrist, and i've never had any problems. They can't disclose anything you say to anyone unless you sign a form allowing them to share information with a specific entity. If someone called their office, they would not even be legally allowed to disclose whether or not you were a client.
     
  9. kingpin008

    kingpin008 Member

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    Fair enough, I stand corrected. The point I was trying to make though, is exactly what you mentioned - no matter what the personal beliefs or motivation such an individual may have, they cannot just arbitrarily "out" you to the police or anyone else, at least without having a really, really good reason. So worrying about such things showing up on background checks and suchlike is really a non-issue.
     
  10. BruceRDucer

    BruceRDucer Member

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    Ah then! A very important distinction!:)
     
  11. ByAnyMeans

    ByAnyMeans Member

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    HIPPA:

    Stands for Health Insurance Privacy and Portablity Act and it prevents any licensed therapist from giving any information about you out unless you
    1) sign consent
    2) make statments that you will harm yourself or others
    3) presented with a court order


    If violated the offender can be stripped of their license , fined up to $10,000
    and even serve jail time but I forget how much. My hospital makes us all take a training once every six months so if we screw up they can pass the blame to us and not be named in a lawsuit (although they probably would anyway).


    As for the role and responsibility of a "psychotherapist" is compared to a psychologist or psychiatrist it depends upon your state , and the persons license. I practice in NYC and short of seeing a psychiatrist for medication adjustment and a psychologist for testing then your seeing me. I handle clients from severe paranoid schizophrenics to worry-wart mothers with no "real" psychiatric illness. This has a lot to due with insurance and managed care comapny;s. It's very similar to nurse practictioner and physician assistants. For the record I'm a clinical social worker.
     
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