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Material to put in walls to reduce penetration

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Fryerpower, Feb 15, 2013.

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  1. mac tm

    mac tm Member

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    What about plaster instead of drywall?
     
  2. ATLDave

    ATLDave Member

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    Ceramic tile - especially a couple of layers with space in between them (perhaps the inside of drywall on either side of the wall - might do something.
     
  3. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator

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    Plaster is generally a bit tougher than drywall, but there's many different wall compositions that would be all called "plaster."

    The best would be a heavy, multi-coat plaster job over wooden lath (preferably split oak lath), and that in sound shape. But there's also forms of plaster applied over some old types of wallboard which wouldn't be as good.

    Then there's the old style masonry "plaster" used as a base for tile in victorian and early 20th century bathrooms. Sometimes that adds to nearly 2" of hard, Portland-based, cement material which would indeed at least deflect many projectiles.
     
  4. Strange Bob

    Strange Bob Member

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    OK, my idea. Can go 2 ways, can strip the existing sheetrock or just over lay it with 3/4" plywood then fill the voids with dry sand. e another 2" of material + sand. A second layer of sheetrock could then be screwed to the plywood. This would result in a wall that could contain the sand and would havOf course all your outlet boxes will need to be sealed very well and I would lower them to near floor level (in case of a direct hit on that area the trajectory would have to be almost on the floor. This is reasonably inexpensive.

    I saw somewhere on an article on the internet (must be true) where a guy was testing
    penetration through sand filled dry wall panels using a 2x6. A single layer of sand filled drywall panels stopped almost all rounds. The original test was discussing sandbag effectiveness.

    OK, quick search and here it is: http://www.naturalbuildingblog.com/bullet-resistance-of-sandbags/
     
  5. ediogenes

    ediogenes Member

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    5.56 mm ammo, especially the current military rounds with the steel core, is intended to go through stuff like walls, car sheet metal, and anything else a bad guy might hide behind. A modern military rifle is a horrible HD weapon if you're concerned about overpenetration. You're better off choosing something with less penetrating ability, such as a shotgun loaded with standard bird shot (#8 or #9, no magnums). But you still have to attend to safety rule #4.
     
  6. Skylerbone

    Skylerbone Member

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    6' X 3' Lexan panels are commonly available at home centers for about $100/sheet. Remove the drywall, cut some 2X4s to ~14" and glue thin edge to edge. (in the garage with clamps) to 7' and let dry. Bring your wooden walls in and install between studs with a few short nails, cover the wall in Lexan and hang drywall.
     
  7. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf member

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    Some people utilize those shipping containers. If you sunk one of those into fifty yards of granite.. well, I'd laugh at you.
     
  8. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf member

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    Well, you got that wrong. Any normal pistol round penetrates more than 55gr ball.
     
  9. Fryerpower

    Fryerpower Member

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    http://www.theboxotruth.com/docs/bot14.htm

    Clearly 5.56/.223 is not going to be stopped by something you just pour into the wall, short of fibercrete with steel reenforcements.

    Maybe I should dial it back to 9mm JHP or FMJ. Something that I am more likely to see coming at me. I am already loaded up with 9mm frangeables, but I doubt someone coming in would be so considerate.

    Jim
     
  10. gym

    gym member

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    You still need to worry about doors and windows, Glass is tough in modern FL homes, as each room has at least 1-3 windows, and putting in 20 plus bullet proof windows and sliders is an expensive proposition. I would concentrate on the exterior walls, and bed rooms. But I never bothered past the thought phase because of the windows, there is no place you are safe that has no window access other than a couple of the bathrooms, even the master has windows floor to ceiling, so anyone who really wanted to could shoot anyone inside just by waiting for them to walk from room to room.
    3M makes a foil that I had in one of my cars, I looked it up recentely and it's made to withstand a couple good swings with a sledge hammer. It also is somwhat bullet resistant. My nephew had it done to his house.
    I never tested it but that is the most practicle stuff I saw for windows. When I bought a Vette years ago, they had a display in the showroom, with a window and a hammer. You couldn't break the window, if you eventually did it would take so long to get through and make so much noise, that it would deter most. It came on the car as a special they were running with chevy. Google it, it may be the best way to have some protetion from handgun ammo.
    There is a lot of stuff out there, here are 2 links I found for walls and glass.
    http://www.pimall.com/nais/bulletprooffilm.html
    http://www.usbulletproofing.com/USBPProductarmor.htm
     
  11. Fryerpower

    Fryerpower Member

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    Not worried about rounds coming in from the street. I'm worried about crossfire inside of the house.

    Jim
     
  12. Teachu2

    Teachu2 Member

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    You could add two layers of 1 1/8" SturdiFloor (T&G plywood) to one side and then drywall. Surface- mount the electrical to avoid voids.

    Or use 3/4" on both sides, fill with concrete, drywall.

    Or build a concrete block wall against the existing one, fill with mortar, and build a conventional wall against that. Costs you about 9" of space.

    Or you could move into a poured-in-place concrete home. These, while not real common, offer tremendous energy savings.

    Heavy dressers around the child's bed offer some protection without the expense and disruption of demolition.

    If penetration is that big a worry, a 12ga with #4 buck is a great choice.

    Finally, having raised kids, this should be pretty low on your list of worries. There are many more common disasters to fret over in your future. :uhoh:
     
  13. mrnic3guy1989

    mrnic3guy1989 Member

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  14. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf member

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    Dirty Harry hates the childerns.
     
  15. mrnic3guy1989

    mrnic3guy1989 Member

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    Certaindeaf: I love the "Sent from my computer using my fingers" tag that is thee best i have seen thus far.
     
  16. Skylerbone

    Skylerbone Member

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    2 7' 2Xs and a 2' square sheet will run you less than $25 to test. That's drywall, 1 3/4" of wooden stud, 1/8" or 1/4" Lexan and another layer of Sheetrock.

    Worried about the floor? Lexan, vapor barrier, laminate or hardwood and a nice room-size wool rug.
     
  17. Arp32

    Arp32 Member

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    By far the cheapest and most efficient way to build up mass is to add more compressed gypsum dust panels (I.e., more drywall). Go watch the Box o' Truth to see how many layers you feel comfortable with, and start screwing them up. 5/8" gyp board is heavy, so bring a friend. Also remember you'll have to either extend your electrical boxes or remount them.
     
  18. Teachu2

    Teachu2 Member

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    And there may come a day you wish you can hear what the kids are doing at night...
     
  19. Fryerpower

    Fryerpower Member

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    @Arp32, Box o truth, see post 34.
    @Skylerbone, building test boxes, see post number 1.

    It might just be easier to pull the drywall and fill the gaps with 2x4s, 4x4s, stacked plywood, or a combination of all of these, and then put up new drywall. Most of the places that have tested penetration state that the framing material is enough to stop a .223.

    Jim
     
  20. Fryerpower

    Fryerpower Member

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    That one is out of the house, and I'm not sure I want to hear boys in their rooms by themselves. No girls in the room unless the door is open solves the other noise I would be worried about.

    Jim
     
  21. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf member

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    I just carry a length of 2x4 in my back pocket for just such occasions. You want to squint a bit though lest wood shards spear your eyeball.
     
  22. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    New house with walls backfilled with dirt and bullet proof glass. Of course that creates humidity issues, but they are addressable.
     
  23. Arp32

    Arp32 Member

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    I have. Didn't say add one layer, said keep adding layers! Don't have Excel handy but I can almost guarantee adding drywall is going to be cheaper and easier than building a "solid" 2x4 wall. Plus you'll get and excellent fire rating and STC rating.

    The Lexan sandwich sounds great until you price Lexan, or try and cut out J-boxes or hang pictures. Plus depending on how the assembly is put together, you may be creating vapor barrier issues.
     
  24. Skribs

    Skribs Member

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    I know this thread has to do with the walls themselves, but since we've started talking about projectile selection and drywall penetration...

    Rounds which will not go far through drywall will go less far through a human target, making them very bad attack stoppers.
    Look at most sources which do testing of terminal ballistics after drywall, and you will find it has more effect on the lethality of rifle rounds than shotgun pellets, unless the pellets are really light. If overpenetration in the house is your primary concern, the .223 is probably your best bet. It will still be very dangerous.
     
  25. Fryerpower

    Fryerpower Member

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    It would take two 4x8 sheets of dry wall to get 6-7 layers in the air gap.
    14.5 inches between studs, 3x14.5 = 43.5 , That leaves a 4.5 inch strip from each 4x8 sheet. You would get 6 good layers plus some partial coverage from the two 4.5 inch strips that make up the 7th layer.
    Call it 6 layers in the gap plus two on the walls. That makes the equivalent of four walls. The round on the Box of Truth went through four walls.

    To get better than that I would have to do like you suggested and add extra layers to the walls.

    Two rows deep of 2x6, 2x6, and 2x4 would cover the 14.5 inch space. Arrange them so that the seams do not line up.

    2x6, 2x6, 2x4
    2x4, 2x6, 2x6

    Throw in one layer of drywall and you will completely fill the void.

    6 ft high is plenty.

    Put a ceramic plate behind the switch plates and power plugs.

    You can use the old drywall you remove to open up the wall as part of the filler and put new drywall up once you are done.

    Only a couple of walls, heck even parts of walls, need to be done like this.

    Sure would be much easier if you just build a new house the way you like it!

    Jim
     
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