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Mauser K98K 243 code

Discussion in 'Firearms Research' started by Yeatert, Jan 24, 2023 at 10:02 PM.

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  1. Yeatert

    Yeatert Member

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    I have a 1939 K98K Mauser code 243 and it has matching serial numbers. How are values determined and are the specific marking that collectors are looking for?
     

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    Last edited: Jan 25, 2023 at 9:01 AM
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  2. JT-AR-MG42

    JT-AR-MG42 Member

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    Welcome to THR.

    Value is based on condition, relative rarity and, most importantly, originality.

    Your rifle seems to have the correct standard firing proofs on the left side receiver and barrel as well as the assigned
    army inspector's office acceptance stamps on the right side receiver and various parts.

    As to specific markings; Air Force, Naval, and SS marked 98s will command more than the standard Army issue.
    Air force and Naval guns will be marked on the right side stock below the takedown disc and also
    sometimes are marked on the disc itself as well.

    Because the SS did not have access to standard arms procurement until around the time we entered the war,
    their early 98Ks came from a few small private contracts and were unmarked as SS.
    Most of their rifles were Gew 98s and quite a few were converted to 98ks, some few of which were
    marked on the barrel and, even less frequently, on the pistol grip of the stock.

    You state the rifle has matching numbers, so I'll mention that on a rifle of that year, matching would include all parts.
    Stock and handguard (numbered in the barrel channel), all screws, bands, all bolt and sight parts.
    If the stacking rod were present, it would also have been numbered to the rifle.

    I don't collect War 2 98s specifically, but I do have quite a few original condition 98's from 1934 thru 45.
    Your photos lack some definition so I'll point out a few concerns I have (if looking to buy the gun) that would give me pause
    and that might detract value.

    The rifle appears to have been nicely refinished.
    The bolt exterior parts and bolt release would have been originally blued.
    The flats (numbers area) on the rear sight leaf (top and bottom) were polished back to bright
    metal on all 1939 rifles.

    It is a very nice looking 98k, thanks for sharing.

    JT
     
  3. Yeatert

    Yeatert Member

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    Thanks for the information on the rifle. I struggle to see marking on the outside of the stock but the underside of the handguard has matching numbers. Any chance you know what the 9039 D on the barrel is? I do not collect but had the option to grab this cheap out of an estate and didn't have a clue what all the markings meant on the gun. I appreciate your time.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2023 at 7:59 AM
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  4. Mauser fan

    Mauser fan Member

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    I had been waiting for somebody like JT to chime in on the topic that is more knowledgable than I and I have to agree with everything he has said. As far as placing a value to it that is another topic all together and will cover two things specifically which leads me to beg these questions. Are you intending to sell it? Are you going to keep it and asking for an appraisal for insurance purposes and going to make it a safe queen? Are going to keep it to shoot it?

    These are some of the questions I ask someone before I render my verdict. Because when it comes to appraising anything for anyone I have to remind myself that an opinion is just that an opinion and is very subjective no matter how many superlative comments might be attached to the review and the owner can get a second opinion.
    If you plan on selling it realistically you can expect roughly 30% of whatever retail value is attached to the appraised value if you intend to sell it. More if the rifle is more complete and proves to be a shooter. Less it if it's not. Considerably less if it is found to be dangerous to fire for example or has mismatched parts and an import.

    I suspect but I could be wrong the number you are referring to is an import rack # assigned to the barrel with then correct chambering 7.92 stamped on the ring where the barrel threads into the receiver. This was done by importers of surplus firearms to prove that it was complete and original. Additionally to prove the chambering is what it is before selling it to the public. One of the importers that stands out furthest in my mind for such practices is SAMCO. There are others out there that did the same thing.

    You still have an intriguing piece of history on your hands. Thanks for sharing and welcome to the forum.

    Jeremy
     
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  5. Yeatert

    Yeatert Member

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    Thanks, I may shoot it someday but for now it will be oiled and in the safe. Just trying to figure out what to tell the insurance man for separate gun policy.
     
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  6. Mauser fan

    Mauser fan Member

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    Now that we know that you intend to keep it. You need to find a smith to appraise it for you. Expect a conservative figure. I also recommend that you have it checked out for safe operation before firing it. Headspace etc. etc. etc.
     
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  7. Yeatert

    Yeatert Member

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    Just for some knowledge what are all these stamps on bottom of receiver
     

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  8. Mauser fan

    Mauser fan Member

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    Inspector stamps.
     
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  9. JT-AR-MG42

    JT-AR-MG42 Member

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    Barrel markings in that location (and often under the stock as well) are manufacturers codes
    (with the date in smaller letters) and lot numbers used by the makers for quality control.

    The 7,9 marking (notice it's a comma, not a period) on the TDC of the barrel
    collar is the interior size of that particular barrel as gauged by (in this case) Mauser/Berlin.
    I've seen 6,89 for the tight side up to 7,93 in size.
    Superfluous on a rifle soon headed for the front no doubt, IIRC the barrel gauge markings were dropped in late 1941/42.

    I'm guessing the bolt is a mismatch? From the lack of blueing compared to the rifle.
    FWIW, quite a few years ago I determined to do my own unscientific experiment
    concerning mis-matched bolts and their relative safety to use.
    I deliberately switched bolts at random on quite a few matching 98ks ranging from a 1934 banner rifle to a 1945 VK98 and fired them all with WWII
    German ball that I had pulled down and loaded into non corrosive primed cases.
    It got real boring real quick as I could not find a fired case taken from one gun that would not re-chamber in others.

    Again, enjoy the deal you got. I've got an 'S/243 1936, but I still keep an eye out for a straight 'AR 42' to
    partner up with my belt gun - my handle is the receiver code.

    JT
     
  10. Yeatert

    Yeatert Member

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    I really appreciate all the questions being answered. I did break it down and all number match minus the stacking block and I don't have a cleaning rod (not sure if that had a serial number). It's all cleaned up, oiled and Ready to be locked away
     

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