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Mild corrosion on a Model 15

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing and Repairs' started by 16in50calNavalRifle, Jun 24, 2013.

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  1. 16in50calNavalRifle

    16in50calNavalRifle Member

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    Friend has an S&W Model 15-2 (taken from a border runner back in the 60s) and he's going to sell it. It has very limited and mild corrosion in two places that I could find: near the muzzle, in the bore, and on/around the adjustable rear sight. I have searched this section for ideas and think I have the right approach, but would like to confirm. Apologies - no photos.

    The bore corrosion looks very light and I think would easily be removed with some CLP and a brass brush (we're talking completely inside the barrel).

    The rear sight is another matter. I forget whether it looked case-hardened (like the hammer). In any case it is mounted on the blued frame. Rust on the sight was greater than in the bore, but not heavy.

    Those in the know please advise on this course of action: brush out the core corrosion with a brass brush and CLP or oil; remove rear sight, use a toothbrush/CLP/Kroil on it to carefully brush away any corrosion - same for the spot on the frame where the sight is mounted, if there's any corrosion there. If a toothbrush doesn't get it done, brass wool with CLP/Kroil.

    Would this approach avoid any damage to the bluing while likely removing any rust that's going to be easily removed? Thanks for all guidance and input.
     
  2. WardenWolf

    WardenWolf member

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    Flitz polish will remove surface rust without damaging bluing or other finishes. Use that with a toothbrush on the rear sight and you should be able to get it clean.
     
  3. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    CLP and a brush will have very little if any effect on bore rust.

    I'd lap the bore with JB Bore Paste on a tight fitting jag & cotton patch.
    http://www.brownells.com/gun-cleani...mbedding-bore-cleaning-compound-prod1160.aspx

    I'd work over the sight and serrations with a wooden pointy skewer stick, toothpick, etc, and Flitz metal polish.
    http://www.acehardware.com/product/...6&KPID=1207315&cagpspn=pla&CAWELAID=109381996

    It will take off the rust without taking off the remaining bluing.

    If you decide brass wool is really necessary?
    Forget that and use 0000 Super-Fine steel wool & oil.

    The brass wool will leave copper tracks all over the serrations, and then you have to figure out how to remove that mess.

    See this for what is possible with Super-Fine steel wool & fine steel wire brushes.
    http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=633232&highlight=1890

    rc
     
  4. ghitch75

    ghitch75 Member

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    RC do you use the 2 row or 4 row bushing wheels?
     
  5. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    2 row or 4 row what?

    Jags?

    Doesn't seem to matter as long as the patch's are tight in the bore.

    rc
     
  6. ghitch75

    ghitch75 Member

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    brushing wheels....
     
  7. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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  8. 16in50calNavalRifle

    16in50calNavalRifle Member

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    Thanks, all. Looks like it will be Flitz and some JP paste (already have that), jag for the bore and toothbrush/pick/etc for the sight. Good to know this stuff - I only have one blued revolver, with no corrosion, but I hope to add to that one and even though I live in a perfect dry climate it's always good to know the solutions to common problems.
     
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