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MOA math made easy

Discussion in 'Competition Shooting' started by dragbag, Jan 30, 2014.

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  1. FiremanJim

    FiremanJim Member

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    I just flip the lever on my rifle to "SEMI-AUTO" and adjust my "Point of Impact" on the deer I'm shooting at, accordingly.
     
  2. Double Naught Spy

    Double Naught Spy Sus Venator

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    I think I will just stick to 1" per 100 yards. My turrets won't adjust in 0.047" increments anyway.
     
  3. JohnKSa

    JohnKSa Member

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    You've been cheated! You must have one of those high-falutin' Yurpeen scopes. Get you some good Chineez optics and they'll adjust in all kinds of increments--usually two or three different increments in just one shootin' session.
     
  4. Double Naught Spy

    Double Naught Spy Sus Venator

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    I already had that issue with a Lithuanian scope, LOL.
     
  5. primalmu

    primalmu Member

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    I just use the OnTarget software. Does all the calculations for me, and makes a pretty picture that I can post online when I have a worthy group. ;)

    [​IMG]
     
  6. GLShooter

    GLShooter Member

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    Everyone develops a comfort zone in ranging and ballistics be it minute of deer, minute of PD or MOA. I do all this in my head because I am a math whizz. Not.easy even with a calculator for some. Pile the trigonometry approach for windage and elevation and it gets pretty three dimensional PDQ.

    I taught this stuff for years to M/O's and the quick and dirty one inch rule was achievable for most guys. Like someone pointed out if a guy could shoot that 0.047 consistently he is one heck of a shot.

    Greg
     
  7. taliv

    taliv Moderator

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    honestly, in all the sniper/field/practical rifle matches i've shot, i can't recall needing to do much math.

    you make a cheat sheet like this:
    [​IMG]

    you take your inputs like wind speed, distance and it gives you the hold. or target size and mil reading and it gives you the distance.

    if you're doing MOA or MIL math in the field before you shoot, you're just not prepared.

    about the only time i use the formula at all is if i get stage descriptions several hours before i shoot, with target sizes, and i know i will need to mil them, i will calculate the target size in order to estimate safe holds so i can shoot in a bracket.
     
  8. Arizona_Mike

    Arizona_Mike Member

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    Assuming your scope has 8 clicks per MOA, the tiny excess would be one more click for 3". If you have 4 clicks per MOA (the most I've seen), the tiny excess would only span 1 click for a 6" adjustment.

    I don't see this every being practical for sighting in.

    Mike
     
  9. taliv

    taliv Moderator

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  10. Crashbox
    • Contributing Member

    Crashbox Member

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    As a surveyor, I'd just get out my $7000 total station and measure the distance to the nearest 0.01 foot, then calculate the MOA on my HP-50G calculator; MUCH simpler...

    NOT!!!

    I like JohnKSa's method, that is one of the simplest I've seen.
     
  11. ole farmerbuck

    ole farmerbuck Member

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    I thought scopes used to be 1/4" or 1/8" (inch) per click and not MOA.
     
  12. JohnKSa

    JohnKSa Member

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    They are 1/4" or 1/8" ONLY at 100 yards. And that's because 1/4" is about 1/4MOA at 100 yards and 1/8" is aobut 1/8MOA at 100 yards.

    Scope adjustments have always been made in terms of angular measurements--that's the only way to make a scope work. However, sometimes they are stated in terms of linear distances/measurements on a target at a given distance (most commonly 100 yards).
     
  13. taliv

    taliv Moderator

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    farmer, some are certainly labeled that way. some, it's anybody's guess what they actually are. some are clearly IPHY and others are clearly MOA or MIL.
     
  14. 1SOW

    1SOW Member

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    An aircraft is much like a bullet. A 1 degree course deviation results in a 1nm deviation at 60nm. 60 to 1 rule. (rounding a nautical mile to 6000 ft)

    A bullet does the same. :D
     
  15. 1911 guy

    1911 guy Member

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    Unless you have a Mil-Dot scope, ignore mils and learn minutes of angle. As stated, 1.047" at 100 yards. If you're not shooting F-class or tiny varmints at big ranges, call it 1"

    As range increases, so does the subtended value of one MOA. Ex: at 200 yards, 1 MOA equals (technically subtends) 2.094 inches.

    "Inches, Minutes, Clicks". How far off was my shot, how many MOA is that at range and how many clicks do I move? A scope that moves 1/4 MOA at 100 yards will also move 1/4 MOA at 200. You've got to watch the ones that are incremented in 1/4 inch, as this begins to deviate from MOA and you'll be one click off at 500 yards and stack up from there. Like I said, it only matters if you shoot longer distances than the average 200 yard deer.

    Truth is, the average shooter is far more likely to miss an animal due to unfamiliarity with elevation issues than forgetting to click off that extra 1/4 MOA.
     
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