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Modern Usefulness of a Single Shot Break Action

Discussion in 'Shotguns' started by Mr. Mosin, Jun 23, 2021.

  1. Mr. Mosin

    Mr. Mosin Member

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    Outside of hunting and nostalgia, what're the remaining usage of said shotgun(s) ?
     
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  2. Virginian

    Virginian Member

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    I am 73. I have always considered them pretty worthless outside of the specialized trap guns.
     
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  3. Oldschool shooter

    Oldschool shooter Member

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    I have found them to be great teaching tools for new shooters. Helps them to learn the importance of making your shots count.
     
  4. bangswitch

    bangswitch Member

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    I'm only 67, but my Stevens 94 is my go-to varmint-get-ridder-of'er-gun. It's a .410 bore, and #4 shot really gets the attention of raccoons, possums, skunks, and even discourages deer from foraging in the garden.
     
  5. Kevin Keith

    Kevin Keith Member

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    Both good reasons to own one. Far from useless!
     
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  6. dh1633pm
    • Contributing Member

    dh1633pm Contributing Member

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    Their viability is that the market for them still exists. Did always consider the double more useful. As a kid hunting rabbits I noted that my dad’s double didn’t shoot anymore than my single. Have times really changed that much.
     
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  7. cdb1

    cdb1 Member

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    When I was a kid in the 60’s, it seemed there were more single shots around than any other type. It was definitely the case in my family. I used a 12 and a 20 gauge until I bought a pump with calf money when I was 13. I don’t care for them.
     
    edcknives, horsey300 and Virginian like this.
  8. LoonWulf
    • Contributing Member

    LoonWulf Contributing Member

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    Cheap, Fun....Cheapfun!
    I can also fold my single shot 20 up and shove it in the door pocket of my dads 4runner....makes hopping out of the truck and blasting stuff a lot easier. It also fits completely inside my hunting pack.
    I also have a 11" 9mm insert for it that shoots surprisingly accurately.
     
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  9. Milkmaster

    Milkmaster Member

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    Those are pretty good reasons you gave! I have other more expensive shotguns too. But I bought this one because the wood was pretty and it shoots great. Maybe a grandson will inherit it someday. IMG_4833.JPG IMG_4839.JPG
     
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  10. Slamfire

    Slamfire Member

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    I used this H&R Topper as a squirrel gun, and it hit hard on both ends. For the price point, this is a fine, functional shotgun. It is dead simple in operation. It ignited and ejected the round 100%. You load a round in the thing, cock it only when you need to shoot. This mechanism uses a transfer bar, so when the hammer is lowered, and the trigger released, nothing hitting the hammer will cause the firing pin to touch the primer. The simplicity of operation makes it ideal for a novice. Loading, firing, ejecting is almost intuitive.

    AgSFmj0.jpg

    uFJ3DXf.jpg

    Sure, when I got enough money, I purchased a pump shotgun, but you know, it did not knock them down any better than the Topper. Having a second shot to waste always made me feel better, but it really was the first shot that counted. Single barrel shotguns have been made in the millions, and I would guess they have gotten more game, on farms, fields, etc, than any other type. I carried it round in the chamber, hammer down, and a couple of shells between the fingers of the right hand when I was hunting. A single barrel shotgun is a working gun and it does that function well.

    I think the case is real, the receiver has to be inexpensive plain carbon steels, there is no need for more expensive steels. I miss H&R, the company made good rifles, pistols, and shotguns for decades.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2021
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  11. Encoreman

    Encoreman Member

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    I would have to argue that point. Those hammers on most single shots are pretty hard for young kids to cock all the way without their thumb slipping off and shooting the gun at some object they weren't meaning to shoot. I hunted long and hard for a .410 for my nephew then my son and grandson and it was a Mossberg single shot bolt action. That is much safer.
     
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  12. Mr. Mosin

    Mr. Mosin Member

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    That a Henry ? If so, how do you like it ?
     
  13. Milkmaster

    Milkmaster Member

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    Yes the Henry .410. The ergonomics work well so far. Doesn't kick nearly as bad as I expected.
     
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  14. WestKentucky

    WestKentucky Member

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    Simplicity. Few moving parts means few parts to break. A perso who has trained with one can easily get off multiple shots quickly so it’s not useless for defense provided you train and tool it up appropriately (side saddle ammo carrier mainly). That also makes it acceptable for all of the shooting games. Simplicity, durability, and cheap is the description of a truck gun so that makes a single shot pretty well universally capable. Only thing I know it can do is the trick shot where like 8 clays are hand thrown by the shooter.
     
  15. Armored farmer

    Armored farmer Member

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    single barrel trapguns dominate the market among dedicated trapshooters. Their simplicity and durability are undeniable. Some of These guys are shooting 10k-100k shots per year. The price tag on the Kolars and Guirrinnis(sp) would make most folks jaws drop and the ca$h regi$ter 'Cha-ching' sound blurt out.

    For us mortals, the venerable single shot is quick to load and unload which makes it a good choice for a back door gun for both the novice and the expert alike.

    They are pretty much ambidextrous.

    I good learning gun for kids, especially exposed hammer guns. All three of my sons took their first deer with an H&R slug gun.

    They are (used to be) inexpensive, and you could own guns in different gauges and calibers.
     
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  16. Bill M.

    Bill M. Member

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    Farm or barn gun. If you want to be able to shoot maybe 1 or 2 critters in your lifetime that are aggravating you. You may never need it but nice to have it if you do.
     
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  17. huntsman

    huntsman Member

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    If it’s got an exposed hammer that requires manual cocking it’s capable of an AD, that in itself is an issue.

    I hunted with one until I could afford an old SXS which is a major upgrade and all I need for hunting
     
  18. Barbaroja

    Barbaroja Member

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    I don’t quite follow your logic here. Care to elaborate?
     
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  19. Cvans

    Cvans Member

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    Just plain fun. Every time I shoot mine I enjoy it and then the empty hull goes flying over my shoulder. Love it.
     
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  20. mcb

    mcb Member

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    Make it a repeater. :D





    I grew up hunting with single-shot shotgun. First year with a 410 and the next several with a 16 gauge. Shell loops on you hunting vest got a workout when the bunny were running good.
     
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  21. Milkmaster

    Milkmaster Member

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    Mine has a hammer block on it unless you are pulling the trigger. Not sure what the concern would be if you obey safe practices and keep your finger off the trigger.
     
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  22. twarr1

    twarr1 Member

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    Agreed. The fact you have to cock it emphasises deliberate action. Compared to explaining a SA/DA Decocker to a novice, it's plain simple.
     
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  23. Kingcreek

    Kingcreek Member

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    I had an AD with a .410 single when my thumb slipped off the hammer before fully cocked but enough spring tension to blow the primer. My finger was off the trigger. It was pointed in a safe direction. Well, wasn’t safe for the porch plank that I had to replace but no other damage…
    They’re cheap, simple, and still functional.
     
  24. PapaG

    PapaG Member

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    My first shotgun was a 410 single. Failure as a pheasant gun on wild flushing birds. Next single was a Win 37 that I added a rib, cheek pad, a triggers shoe and a recoil pad for my first trap gun. Throw in a dozen others from 410 to 10(killer on both ends) , in shot, slug, and trap configuration and you have my history. I have one I still shoot a lot, my BT99 from 1974. Also a 410, 20, and my great uncles Shattuck 10 from the 1880s. I still shoot it once in a while. Gives the kids at the trap club a thrill seeing the huge cloud from four or more drams of 1f black
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2021
  25. bullseye308

    bullseye308 Member

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    My first shotgun was an NEF single 20 ga. and I still have it. $65 at Walmart 25+ years ago. I stopped at a turkey shoot on the way home and had someone explain the shoot to me then unpacked the new gun. After a couple hours I was asked to leave so I took my $550, 5 turkeys, 4 hams, and 25# of bacon and left. I have shot skeet with it, rabbit and squirrel hunted with it, and taught dozens of kids how to shoot with it. It stands ready to defend the home if necessary and would definitely slow someone down enough to get to something better. They can do pretty much everything that needs to be done in one shot, and with a little practice a second shot can be pretty quick.
     
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