Mosin Nagant - Am I the only one who does NOT like these?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Quoheleth, Oct 16, 2011.

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Mosin - Love, Like or Leave?

Poll closed Nov 15, 2011.
  1. Love the Mosin - will not be without at least one.

    131 vote(s)
    36.3%
  2. Like the Mosin - take it or leave it.

    141 vote(s)
    39.1%
  3. Leave it - nothing good to say about it.

    89 vote(s)
    24.7%
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  1. EVEgreen2001

    EVEgreen2001 Member

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    I picked up mine from a local pawn shop this past summer (not even shopping for it). I saw one from 1943 on the rack and handled it for a minute or two. The guy who helped me had the idea to hand pick one still in it's shipping box from Century. Behold! It's a 1925 Izzy, ex-Dragoon (hex reciever). 48" long, 65" w/ bayonet, came with two double ammo pouches, a sling, an oil canister, and a tool kit. All of the numbers match except for the bayonet. That's okay. :) Yeah, it was covered in cosmoline, but hey, it was $107.00 all said and done!!! I've put 81 rounds through it so far, and I love it!!! My first rifle, WOW!!!
     
  2. nathan

    nathan Member

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    Just look at it as a centerfire brand of musket. Have fun.
     
  3. oldpapps

    oldpapps Member

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    wojownik
    Nice!

    OSOK
     
  4. mgregg85

    mgregg85 Member

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    What else can you buy for $80 that might have killed some nazis in its time?

    They are cheap, reasonably accurate, tough and ammo is widely available, whats not to love?

    To the op, it sounds as if you might have gotten a bad one. Both my 91/30 and M44 have triggers that are under 10 pounds and shoot about minute of paper plate at 100 yards with me pulling the trigger.
     
  5. dirtyjim

    dirtyjim Member

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    alvin texas
    crude junk built for illiterate masses, sounds a lot like the remington 700.
     
  6. zoom6zoom

    zoom6zoom Member

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    My first (and my first milsurp as well) was an 1896 dated, bought from an ad in the back of American Rifleman and mailed to my door in the early 80's. At the time it might have been an inexpensive rifle, but it was definitely NOT a cheap shooter, as there was no surplus ammo to be had. About the only thing you could feed it was fairly expensive and hard to find Norma brand. Luckily the brass lasted a good number of reloadings.

    Still have and shoot that old warhorse, and have added multiple relatives to the collection as well.

    Yes, they can indeed be accurate. Especially in the hands of the Finns, who converted some into these M28/76 versions:
    FinnishM28-76.gif

    If you're not up with the recoil, you could always get one of the .22 trainer versions.
    Polish22.gif
     
  7. caribou

    caribou Member

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    Sep 12, 2008
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    Location:
    North West Alaska
    Only accurate rifles are interesting

    I make a living with my Mosin.


    Three shots, three Caribou.....
    th_HeadshotHeartshotHeadshot.jpg
    Double tap onna 8 foot BrownBears brain, 400yards.
    th_BB11AgnesIandaBrownbear.jpg
    600yard shot onna trotting wolf
    th_BlackWolfApril10.jpg
    200+ yard shot onna running wolf
    th_Wolf.jpg
    10'2"sq Brown Bear the Miss's caught a couple years back
    th_kiwalik12.jpg
    kiwalik65.jpg

    th_HPIM1659.jpg
    th_CLIP0004.jpg
    Even small game get to my guts via Mosin Nagant


    Make mine a Mosin :D
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2011
  8. benzy2

    benzy2 Member

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    I don't get the craze. I've got one because it sounded cool but it quickly was tossed to the back of the safe and doesn't get touched. Sure they are cheap and ammo is cheap. Mine isn't accurate. I've seen reports of some being decent. Problem is that even the best seem to maybe compare to the average of a budget rifle being built today. Many options are available in the $300-$500 price point. I'd rather have a rifle that shoots 1-2" groups at 100 yards and costs $300-$500 than one that shoots 6-10" groups and costs $100. While I've heard of MN shooting better than that, I haven't seen one in person do so. Ammo is also harder to find. None of the mom and pop shops around here stock it at all. A couple of the big chains carry some of the expensive current manufacture ammo. If I want to get in on the cheap ammo boat I've got to ship it. It's not a huge concern but if I run out, I can't drive 10 minutes and have another spam can of it.

    I don't collect so I don't appreciate what they offer there. For me, if I'm looking for a budget rifle, give me something current built for the extra money.
     
  9. 6x6pinz

    6x6pinz Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2008
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    660
    absolutely love mine. I have the 44 and the 38. I don't know why anyone can't shoot them well. The ones we play with are as accurate as the shooter. They do give my K98 a run for its money but I still like the little 44 package better. These rifles got me into shooting the 54r round and now along with several semis I am in pursuit of a belt fed 54r.
     
  10. RatherNotSay

    RatherNotSay Member

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    I usually turn my cheek on anything century arms.
     
  11. cyclopsshooter

    cyclopsshooter Member

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    Have an M-44 and I love it! Mostly because I DONT have to care about it :)
     
  12. theriflespeaks1863

    theriflespeaks1863 Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Appleton, WI
    An interesting thought...

    Maybe a Mosin is like what old president Teddy said about rifles, "their usefulness depends on the character of the user."

    I give you three good examples, just food for thought:

    Simo Hayha
    Vasily Zaytsev
    Lyudmila Pavlichenko

    Mosin madness, for sure! Not flaming, just laying out a few counterpoints. A machine can only be as good as the man (or woman) wielding it.

    Cheers,

    Chris
     
  13. SleazyRider

    SleazyRider Member

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    Feb 25, 2008
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    1,821
    Location:
    New York
    Speaking of counterpoints ...

    I don't know, folks, according to Bud's website, "The Russians modernized their model 1891 rifle into what would become one of the most successful milita*ry arms the world has ever known! Its simple and robust design, accuracy and awesome reliability served the Soviets well as their main *battle rifle of WWII. Under appreciated until recently, the Mosin Nagant is one of the hottest collec*tibles on the market today!" What's not to like? :D

    My only gripe is with the safety ... what were they thinking? :confused:
     
  14. RatherNotSay

    RatherNotSay Member

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    it's still manufactured by century arms....
     
  15. Auto426

    Auto426 Member

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    Not. Even. Close.

    Century doesn't manufacture any of the Mosin Nagants they sell. They simply import them into the U.S., add a serial number for legal purposes, and sell them. The majority of the Mosin's they import are Russian WWII manufacture, typically by either Tula or Izhevsk arsenals.
     
  16. towboat_er

    towboat_er Member

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    it's still manufactured by century arms

    LOL...shows how much you know.
     
  17. ErikO

    ErikO Member

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    Eastern Missouri
    Spend $30 every three years and no transfer fees on a rifle older than your grandfather. I anticipate having a few of these when I take the drit nap, don't ahve to worry about the wife getting swindled on them, either. ;)
     
  18. ErikO

    ErikO Member

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    The safety kicks in after you've shot it five times. ;)
     
  19. henrifirstman

    henrifirstman Member

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2011
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    I got mine from a buddy for $100 and I'm happy. I have the cut down version and love it.
    I guess since these rifles are so old, bore condition can vary, effecting accuracy.
    Luckily mine's good. I fired an ar-15 moments after the mosin (fellow shooter at the range)
    And haha what can I say, 7.62x54r for the win.
     
  20. henrifirstman

    henrifirstman Member

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    I'm 6'4" and have the shorter version (m91/59) and it works fine, but then again my right arm tends to stick out a lil haha. Nothing a little practice won't fix (first rifle)
     
  21. RatherNotSay

    RatherNotSay Member

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    They still need to be tested, safety checked and if necessary reassembled BY century arms before that "C.A.I. ST. ALB. VT.M91 7.62R RUSS stamp is put on." Granted some are restored/remanufactured after WWII with tula, izhevsk, and sestroryetsk but if century arms had anything to do with it then it speaks for itself. If this was a relic then maybe they could pass it off as such but I see no language saying so.
     
  22. RatherNotSay

    RatherNotSay Member

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    After some research arsenal refinishes only the hardwood and some metal parts. Everything else is inspected and reassembled and if necessary re-manufactured using safe parts. Given CIA's current and past quality control one can expect CIA work. I sent an email so we'll have some clear answers just in case ;)
     
  23. Auto426

    Auto426 Member

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    Century performing a function test on a Mosin-Nagant is quite a far step from them "manufacturing" the gun as you stated. Century is not making any of the parts on the gun and they aren't assembling Mosin's from bins of used parts. If they did, the gun's wouldn't qualify for C&R status. The vast majority of the Mosin's being imported now were arsenal refinished by the Russian's after WWII. They were covered in cosmoline, packed in crates, and placed in storage waiting for a war that never came.

    Century is simply taking those crates of surplus Mosin's and electro-penciling the legally required information on them such as importer marks and a serial number. Hell, Century isn't even the sole importer of Mosin's. There are plenty of other companies out there importing them, and apart from the importer's mark you couldn't tell the difference between a Century Mosin and a Mosin from another company.
     
  24. wojownik

    wojownik Member

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    Auto426 is correct. AFAIK, the only ATF requirement to do a safety test on an imported rifle is as part of the application process to import the products. That is, to determine if the type or class of weapon meets basic requirements - not testing individual weapons, but the overall type.

    I've had many Mosins (and other rifles) from Century and other importers that were in the original wrapping, and absolutely caked in thick cosmoline. There would be no way the importer did anything more than peek at the serial number for recordation and stamp an import mark.
     
  25. sansone

    sansone Member

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    north florida USA
    I don't want one, but surely the rifle deserves proper respect for it's age and durability
     
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