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mosin nagant trigger work

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing and Repairs' started by kingcheese, Aug 26, 2012.

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  1. kingcheese

    kingcheese Member

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    So i got an m91/30 that i want to accurize, right now I'm only working with the trigger assembly, so far i polished the pin that holds the trigger in place, the bearing surfaces that the pin sits in, the trigger, and the part of the sear the trigger pushes on, its fairly smooth now, but I'm wanting to reduce the triggers travel, ideally without a whole no assembly and no power tools
     
  2. Caliper_Mi

    Caliper_Mi Member

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    Some people will make a shim out of a soda can and place one or several between the sear spring and the receiver where the sear spring screws in. Be careful as you will also be reducing the sear engagement. Make sure the rifle passes the "bump test" before taking it out to the range.
     
  3. Centurian22

    Centurian22 Member

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  4. kingcheese

    kingcheese Member

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    Ok, so i used a pop tab as a shim and it lowered the pull weight, and ill have to shoot it some to see if.i like it, and yes it passed the(bump test) i used a rubber mallet for that
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2012
  5. Centurian22

    Centurian22 Member

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    It varies from gun to gun from what I've heard. It's a trial and error thing. I would / plan to start with layers of soda can aluminum, one at a time. Free and easy to work with. If I end up stacking enough to make the thickness of a washer I'll swap out and 'upgrade'. At each new thickness you're supposed to put the bolt in, check to make sure it catches and can't be removed without pulling the trigger, check the trigger pull, close the bolt hard to make sure the firing pin doesn't drop, and after settling on a thickness and putting the action back in the stock make sure to do the drop/bump test.

    Good luck and let us know how it works out for ya.
     
  6. dprice3844444

    dprice3844444 member

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    se fla i love claymores 01/sot
  7. kingcheese

    kingcheese Member

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    Ok, i tried a few different sizes of home made shims, the pop can tab was the only thing that worked, but it wasn't stable enough so the polish job is all i will do to this one, the problem i ran into was the rifle failed to decock, it would release and do everything else fine but it wouldn't slowly decock, thanks for the help and I'm sure ill have a new project soon
     
  8. Caliper_Mi

    Caliper_Mi Member

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    Come again? The Mosin has NO decock function except to fire it.
     
  9. kingcheese

    kingcheese Member

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    Not an automatic function, but when the gun is in working order you can grab the knob on the back of the bolt and pull the trigger to decock it
     
  10. Centurian22

    Centurian22 Member

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    Kingcheese: I hope I didn't misslead you, when I mentioned "layers of soda can" I was referring to cutting a 'washer' shape from the side of the can and drilling a hole to fit the sear screw. This should fix the 'stability' problem. I'm also confused about the de-cocking comment you made as your holding the knob back is what controls how fast or slow it would de-cock.
     
  11. jkpq45

    jkpq45 Member

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    I did what BluEyes suggested by installing shims under the sear screw; took the trigger from~0.75" travel to about 0.1" travel. Trigger sits further rearward in the housing now and has a more predictable break point.

    Unload the rifle, cock it and close the bolt, then bounce the butt on the carpet about 10 times, hard. If the rifle is no longer cocked after this exercise, thin the shims--your trigger isn't safe.
     
  12. kingcheese

    kingcheese Member

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    I decock my rifle by slowing down the knob, witch is attached to the
     
  13. TurtlePhish

    TurtlePhish Member

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    So you polished the sear/trigger surface, correct? Try polishing the surface of the sear that engages the cocking piece.

    _______/ /_ <The top right corner of the angled part of the sear if viewed from this side
    --------------
     
  14. Centurian22

    Centurian22 Member

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    Turtle: great point, as I plan to do this as well what do you recomend polishing these parts with? Very high grit sand paper (1200-1600) or a polishing wheel on a dremel or what?
     
  15. kingcheese

    kingcheese Member

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    I used simichrome, don't use a power tool because its to aggressive, the goal is to smooth burs and not remove metal, yes, all metal on metal contact points where polished, and correctly, the problem is MY nagant, there is to much slop between the bolt and the guides so a little down word pressure was binding it up, i tried making while from the popcan, by the time it was in the butter zone i was looking for i used a caliper and measured the difference to be.040inches, because of the short bolt used to retain the spring, it wasn't locking down
     
  16. kingcheese

    kingcheese Member

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    I used coton balls and q-tips to apply the compound, it is notacably smoother now, but my original goal was only to get rid of the gritty feeling, not lighten the pull
     
  17. Caliper_Mi

    Caliper_Mi Member

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    Just be sure to never do this with a live round in the chamber! What you are doing is lowering the firing pin, and it would be pressing against the primer if there were a round in the chamber.
     
  18. kingcheese

    kingcheese Member

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    Of course, i don't leave my guns loaded, i just do that when I'm locking them up,
     
  19. TurtlePhish

    TurtlePhish Member

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    I started with 600 grit lapping compound, then 1200. Really polished it up. I don't think you'll see an improvement from 1200-1600 grit.
     
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