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Mosin-Nagant user thread

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Franco2shoot, Jan 28, 2008.

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  1. bender

    bender Member

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    Tried slugging the barrel (never done it before with any gun) with fishing sinkers I bought at W-M. Wanted the egg sinker 1/8 size, but they were out, so I got the egg sinker 1/4 size. Turned out to be a little too big though.
    What's everyone else use for slug lead? Never done it before, so I'm a novice at it. Did pick up a .25" hardwood dowel while I was at W-M.

    edit: it's got a killer recoil & muzzle blast. What's a nice lighter load to shoot with? Also what dies are good? Are Lee OK, that's what most of my others are. I'd prefer to neck-size only... are there dies in 7.62x54R that neck-size only?
     
  2. Matt-J2

    Matt-J2 Member

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    When I slugged my bore, I used the 1/8 sinkers and .454 balls from my 1851 Navy replica. Forcing the balls into the muzzle shrinks em down quite a bit and you get a lead ring leftover, but it comes out the same size as the smaller sinkers.
     
  3. fireflyfather

    fireflyfather Member

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    only neck sizer is the classic lee loader. cheap, though. Good load is 13gr red dot, or 7gr with cast. Just give good crimp, and for 7gr loads, shoot at 25yds, should shoot close to POI.
     
  4. ndolson

    ndolson Member

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    Have you tried shooting with the bayonet extended. I have several M44's and every one I own or have ever shot shoots FAR left with the bayonet folded. Extend it, dead on center. Something about the way the gas leaves the barrel.

    I didn't believe it until I tried it...
     
  5. dmftoy1

    dmftoy1 Member

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    I'm using cast boolits from a 314299 mold that with a gas check come out at 207 grains from straight wheel weights over 17-19 grains of 2400. (good cheap round for shooting) They're sized to .312 but that's because that's the only die I had that was close. If I had a .313 I would've used it!

    The first batch with no tweaking was putting the 18 and 19 grain loads into right around an inch at 50 yards BUT I had to set the rear sight at 600meters! :) My range is under about 6 feet of water right now so I haven't been able to get back out.

    If you don't want to cast for it then I'd start out with the .312 Hornady jacketed spire points (150 grains). I suspect that those would shoot pretty close to what the sights are regulated with and keep you from having to cast if you're not already doing it.

    I'm using the "deluxe" lee set of 7.62 x 54R dies FWIW. With the deluxe set you get a collet crimp die. I did have to buy a Lyman 31M die for the cast bullets and if I was using just the lee set I'd have to give a think to how I would expand the neck as the lee set seems to set the necks for .308 bullets which aren't going to shoot well in your Mosin. Someone told me you could get a .311 or .312 expander ball from Lee for the dies . .don't know if that's true or not.

    Regards,
    Dave
     
  6. Franco2shoot

    Franco2shoot Member

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    What does "Slugging" the barrel do? How is this procedure carried out?

    KKKKFL
     
  7. Matt-J2

    Matt-J2 Member

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    Basically, you shove a piece of soft lead down the barrel, it conforms to the shape and size of the bore, and then you measure it to see what your bore diameter actually is. Then you know what diameter bullets to shoot best from your rifle. :)
    For a better explanation and a tutorial, see 7.62x54r.net here.
     
  8. dmftoy1

    dmftoy1 Member

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    You can buy a slugging kit from Midway and some of the other suppliers. The reason you can benefit on a Mosin is that the barrel groove diameters vary from .308 on a Fin to .314 on some of the Russians. If you try to shoot a .308 bullet in a .314 barrel you're going to be fairly disappointed in the non-existent accuracy. Plus, you really wouldn't want to shoot a .314 bullet in a .308 barrel because at a minimum you'd have higher pressures and potentially you might have a more serious problem. (although probably not)

    Regards,
    Dave
     
  9. MilsurpShooter

    MilsurpShooter Member

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    Take a buckshot shell, slice it open, flatten out one of the shots a little and use that to slug the bore.
     
  10. RandyB

    RandyB Member

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    here is mine.
     

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  11. Lon371

    Lon371 Member

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    Here is mine. Dgrease, added scope & mount, refinished the wood and metal, modified the bolt. Now I am scared to take it out. :) I guess I need to buy another to use for a shooter.;)
    MOSIN1.jpg
    100_1664.jpg
     
  12. 000Buck

    000Buck Member

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    I found a Chinese 1955 M44 at the gunshow today. I was excited to get it as I never see anything but Russian Mosins at the shows around here, Ive got a few of those already. The only real differences I see in this chinese one is the clips that hold the barrel bands on are cheaper looking and less sturdy. The trigger is much lighter too but is loose/free floating the first 1/4" of play.
     

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  13. alemonkey

    alemonkey Member

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    000Buck - that's a Type 53. The Red Chinese had no gunmaking capacity of their own, so the Russians sent their obsolete equipment for making M44's to them. Since they were made on the same equipment they're pretty much the same gun.

    I just shot my 53 for the first time today. It was reasonably accurate, but it shoots about 8" to the right and about the same amount high, whether the bayonet is extended or not.

    I'd heard a lot of horror stories about how hard the M44's kick, but I didn't think it was bad at all. Of course, I was trying out some pretty hot new .45-70 loads at the same session, so it seemed pretty mild in comparison.
     
  14. dmftoy1

    dmftoy1 Member

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    I was able to sneak out today and do some shooting of my M44 today with handloads. (It was 37 degree's and we're supposed to have a daytime high tomorrow of 12 with windchills into the negative 10 range :( )

    Anyway, I had one really nice 3 shot group going (at 50 yards) and jerked my last shot . .so I ended up with my first shot low, 3 cutting a single hole, and the 5th high and right. I'm thinking that if I can work on the trigger a bit I'll be having alot of fun with this gun! I can ring the 10 inch gong now with ease and with my first attempt with factory ammo I couldn't hardly hit the berm, let along the gong.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. Junior1942

    Junior1942 Member

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    This is my first post here, and I was sure glad to see a Mosin-Nagant topic. I have two: an M38 with a 2.5x28 Leupold in scout scope mode, and a butchered M44 I christened my Rain Rifle or Hell or High Water Rifle. The picture shows the $2 rear, elevation adjustable peep sight I just installed on its cocking piece. The sight is a 7/8" Uncle Mike's 10-32 machine screw swivel stud. The in-progress front sight is a Williams Streamlined ramp with a Fire Sight.

    rr02.jpg
     
  16. rockinrussky

    rockinrussky Member

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    I've got an Izhevsk 91/30 Nagant myself. I'd post a pic but it looks exactly the same as any typical MN out there. One strange thing is that it doesn't have a year of manufacture stamped, is that common for a rounded 91/30 receiver?
    I've also been considering getting a Mosin with a hexagonal receiver. Nothing special, just another Russian one. Is there a remarkable difference in the looks and or functionality of these rifles? I may still buy it just out of historical interest either way.
     
  17. Avenger

    Avenger Member

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    Somebody didn't stamp it, quality control missed the mistake, and I doubt that the front line was going to send it back for something that had no effect on the FUNCTIONING of the rifle. I've got a 42 Tula missing the large arsenal stamp on the receiver, all the rest are there though.
    I doubt there is any real difference in 91/30 with hex or smooth receivers. The hex ones would, IN THEORY, be a tiny bit stronger, since it has a little bit more material, but c'mon now! Oh, a smoothie would be a tiny little bit lighter.
     
  18. Ignition Override

    Ignition Override Member

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    Sure, this is a silly question, but many people on this website have many years with various weapons and good advice.
    I only have a few weeks experience with a new (Kahr) M-1 carbine, now back in the factory-before that just a .22 rifle.

    Yesterday I visited an 'Army/Navy' pawn shop-my first look inside such a shop. They have two Mosin Nagants . The solid appearance and the prices grabbed my attention.

    Would you buy one for $130, and if so, what should an inexperienced shooter look for in such a bolt-action before buying, other than seeing rust in the action etc? At least it is not a semi-auto, with so many more possible combinations of problems. If many parts are available, can a very experienced gunsmith repair one with the correct spare part, if needed?

    Do the carbine versions use the standard Russian 7.62 X 39?
    If not, do the rounds cost a bit more via Internet etc? Bass Pro only seems to have this type- for the AK.

    LionKing: In one of your photos the mix of brown color of those rounds next to your gun looked just like the skin color of a copperhead snake. Such beautiful rifles in those photos up there.
     
  19. Matt-J2

    Matt-J2 Member

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    The carbine versions use the 7.62x54 just like the full size, not the 7.62x39. Ammo might be a little more, but when buying surplus it's still not expensive. Quite a bit different with commercial loadings though. Not as many available, and most cost a bit more.
     
  20. baz

    baz Member

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    Ignition override,

    Most important thing you need to understand first: MN's use 7.62x54r ammo, not 7.62x39. There is quite a bit of difference. You'll probably have to get your ammo over the internet, or at gun shows, as the sporting good chains I've been in typically do not stock it. It will be more expensive than 7.62x39, not not as expensive as more common 30 caliber ammo. There is some surplus ammo still available, but I think the supply will be soon exhausted.

    $130 is not a bad price, all things considered. With a C&R, you can still get one shipped for under $100, but you are buying sight unseen. If you don't have a C&R, you'll have to add $25 or so for the FFL transfer fee. I wouldn't pay any more than that for a run of the mill MN, but all and all it is not unreasonable.
     
  21. Threejs

    Threejs Member

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    I own a couple (more than 5 less than 50). Here are the ones I really enjoy having in the collection.

    M44:
    Izhevsk 1943
    Tula 1944 (Hexagon reciever)
    Hungarian 1952

    M91:
    Tikka 1942
    VKT 1940
    Izhevsk 1915
    New England Westinghouse 1915

    M91/30
    Tula 1936 Hexagon Receiver (FInn Capture)
    Tula 1940 (Finn Capture)
     
  22. biscuitninja

    biscuitninja Member

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    Just took my Russian M44 out. I have done some minor Bubba work to it. (bipod, insta scope, flash supressor, shoulder saver, sling, clean, clean and more cleaning... and when I got tired I cleaned a little more. At 25 yards my group was ~1" (1 flier dammit!). Was nice when I touched off a round, it was like a strobe light went off in the boom. The boom was pretty cool also!
    good luck
    -bix
     
  23. researchdoc

    researchdoc Member

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    Biscuit... pictures please!
     
  24. Franco2shoot

    Franco2shoot Member

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    They are addictive, and you'll find fun to shoot. I keep improving mine.. This weekend found a nice bayonet from the same arsenal and with a little cleaning it snaps on easily and makes for an awsum weapon with that 18 inch pig sticker poking out front.

    KKKKFL
     
  25. benEzra

    benEzra Moderator Emeritus

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    [​IMG]

    Finn M39, built on an Izhevsk hex receiver dated 1905, and still retains the imperial crest on the receiver. The rifle was upgraded to M39 status in 1942 at the Finnish VKT arsenal in Jyvaskyla. Possibly during the war, an artistic Finnish soldier delicately carved the initials "E.T." into the rear sight base, where they wouldn't easily be seen by casual inspection.

    Best group I've ever gotten is 1 3/8" at 100 yards, 4 shots.
     
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