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Mossberg Autoloader: Selection help request

Discussion in 'Shotguns' started by BlondeBear63, Feb 10, 2018.

  1. BlondeBear63

    BlondeBear63 Member

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    I am looking to replace my Mossberg 500 with a new Mossberg autoloader. My 500 is old enough not to wear serial numbers and has a single action bar. I have had no troubles with this arrangement, however, it is time for a new gun. I am very accustomed to the top safety and am a Mossberg man.

    The following are VERY important:
    It be a Mossberg.
    It be an autoloader.
    The barrel be no longer than 22".
    It has the adjustable "Drop Stock".
    It be less than $600 when completed.
    It should be blue and black.

    I like the JM Pro, however it does not come with the "Drop Stock".
    http://www.mossberg.com/product/930-jm-pro-series-autoloaders-85119/

    I really like the 935 throws a pattern tighter & further than the 930.
    However, this model only comes in camo:
    http://www.mossberg.com/product/935-magnum-turkey-81045/

    Do I buy the JM Pro as well as a "Drop Stock"?
    Is it worth the cost of refinishing a brand new gun to remove the camo?
    Do I buy the cheapest Black/Blue autoloader, the barrel I want, then sell the unwanted barrel?

    This will primarily be a hunting gun as well as do a bit of target shooting.
    Hunting will be squirrels to turkey to buckshot for deer.

    I wouldn't mind having to buy high brass 2 3/4" shells to feed the 935, especially to gain the extra reach the 935 claims to achieve.

    Can someone describe for me the differences in range, given the same pellet density and 3" loading between the 930 and 935?

    Thanks in advance to all who help.
     
  2. cdb1

    cdb1 Member

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    Marketing hype. 3.5 inch doesn’t give you more range. What do you mean by a drop stock?
     
  3. WestKentucky

    WestKentucky Member

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    When 3.5s came out they did have an advantage, but standard 3" shells have made up almost all of the ground between them. I'm a Mossberg man too and my money would be on the JM Pro
     
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  4. JSH1

    JSH1 Member

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    "..... its Stock Drop System provides 5 drop-at-comb adjustments to further perfect fit for any shooter."
     
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  5. cdb1

    cdb1 Member

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    My bad, I’ve never heard it called that. You’re talking about shims. You could get a 930 Combo Field/Security for well under $500.00
     
  6. z7

    z7 Member

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    My 930jm pro came with the Shims to adjust the comb height,
    It also comes with 3 chokes, full, modified and IC

    I have shot some clays with it, and two 3 gun matches, no issues in about 400rds, bird buck and slugs. I like the gun for sure
     
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  7. BlondeBear63

    BlondeBear63 Member

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    It looks like the JM Pro has the edge.
    However, I am not yet clear to the advantages of the 935's barrel to that of the standard like that of the 930.
    I can use any extra range I can get without sacrificing pattern density or the need for specialty ammunition.
     
  8. cdb1

    cdb1 Member

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    The JM Pro is not a hunting gun. Neither is it a target gun if you are talking Skeet, Trap or Sporting Clays.

    The 935 will shoot 2.75”-3.5” shells. A 930 will shoot 2.75”-3” shells. The recoil from a 3.5” shell is not pleasant and has been known to cause detached retinas. The 3.5” 12 gauge had a place when steel shot was first mandated for waterfowl hunting. With the advent of improved shotshell technology the 3.5” 12 gauge’s day has passed in the estimation of many, myself included. If you will be shooting clay sports, a 935 will be more prone to NOT cycling target loads than a 930.

    If I were going to shoot 3.5” shotshells I’d get a 10 gauge, a Browning Gold, Ithaca Mag 10 or Remington SP-10. Recoil is very manageable with them.
     
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  9. BlondeBear63

    BlondeBear63 Member

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    Other than the extended magazine tube, what reasons make the JM Pro unsuitable for hunting?
    There are really only two places I hunt where using a 3.5" would be worth consideration. So, it isn't a must have. However, given identical ammo if the pattern density from the 935 at 55 yards is about same as the 930 at 45-50 yards, I still find the 935 intriguing.
     
  10. cdb1

    cdb1 Member

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    I didn’t say the JM Pro was unsuitable for hunting, I said it is not a hunting shotgun, it is a competition shotgun.

    If you hunt migratory fowl you’ll need to plug a JM PRO. Someone may make one, if not you will have to fabricate one. For wing shooting I’d find an extended mag cumbersome.

    3.5” shells throw more shot than 3”. IMO 3.5” shells don’t gain you anything appreciably unless you are hunting geese and then a 10 gauge will have much less recoil and pattern better(usually) than a 3.5” 12 gauge.
     
  11. FL-NC

    FL-NC Member

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    I have 2 930's. My first is a JM PRO. I tried a friend's some years back, and got one for myself for 3 gun. I got this in lieu of a Benelli, and am very happy with it for 3 gun. Last year I decided to go to an auto for turkey hunting. My 870 turkey barrel gun throws great patterns, but it really kicks with 3" mags. Based on my experience with the JM PRO, I bought a hunting/ fudd style 930. It is now my go-to shotgun for anything with feathers. I gave my 2 3/4" 1100 to my nephew after I got the hunting 930.
     
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  12. BlondeBear63

    BlondeBear63 Member

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    I will assume it possible to interchange caps and extensions.
    Are there reason(s) the JM Pro wouldn't make a good dedicated hunting gun?

    I am still curious if I were to use 2 3/4" 6 shot in both guns, what distances produce the same pattern density between the 930 and 935.
     
  13. cdb1

    cdb1 Member

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    They should be the same. The only thing about a 935 that could possibly increase the range over a 930 would be shooting 3.5” shells over 3” shells.
     
  14. FL-NC

    FL-NC Member

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    Depends on the choke you screw into the end of it, and how well it performs.
     
  15. BlondeBear63

    BlondeBear63 Member

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    The 930 has the standard 2 3/4" - 3" autoloader barrel.
    The 935 has an over-bored or "back bored" 2 3/4" - 3 1/2" autoloader barrel.

    My understanding is when using exactly the same round, barrels like that of the 935 are more capable of holding a pattern further out than its 930 counter part. With buckshot, would either be capable of coyotes at 60 yards without the need for 3 1/2" loads?
     
  16. cdb1

    cdb1 Member

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    IMO what you’ve read is a myth. It’s real simple. If you want a 935, and it seems as if you do and are trying to get someone to validate your desire, then just get one.
     
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  17. z7

    z7 Member

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    I looked when I was thinking about the 930 and a standard mag spring and cap for the tube is less than $20. It would take 5 mins to remove the msg extension and plug the gun for hunting
     
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  18. BlondeBear63

    BlondeBear63 Member

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    cdb1,

    You are mostly correct. I have hoped some one with experience would chime in with something like, "If the 930 & 935 used the same length barrel, choke, as well as ammo, due to being back bored affecting the resulting constriction (choke) ratios, the 935 will pattern the same at 50 yards as does the 930 at 40 yards."

    But on the other hand, doesn't the JM Pro sound like a lot of fun? :)
     
  19. cdb1

    cdb1 Member

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    It won’t. That is what I’m trying to tell you. A 935 barrel is not going to pattern tighter than a 930. Each barrel is different. If you took a large enough sample of 930’s and 935’s, used the same choke and ammunition in all shotguns, at least half the 930’s would pattern tighter than the 935’s. BACK-BORING IS A MARKETING GIMMICK USED TO SELL SHOTGUNS.
    http://www.chuckhawks.com/backboring_does_not_work.htm
    http://www.randywakeman.com/TheGrandLieofBackBoring.htm
    https://rifleshooter.com/2015/07/shotgun-back-boring-explained/


    z7 has a good suggestion.
     
  20. George P

    George P Member

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    It is not the barrel, but the choke that determines the pattern. Same load, same choke, same pattern....
     
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  21. BlondeBear63

    BlondeBear63 Member

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    The Mossberg Models 835/935 have 10 gauge barrels with chambers bored to 12 gauge dimensions rather than 10 gauge. It is easy to find modern 12 gauge ammunition equivalent to traditional 10 gauge loadings. No back boring nor over boring, no forcing cone tricks, no super cleaning etc.
    Choke_Constriction.jpeg
    The advantage? The portion of a barrel from entering the forcing cone to exiting the muzzle is a funnel. The greater cross sectional area means less friction and hence greater velocity as well as more room for the pellets leading to less deformation.
    chokespec.jpg
    Over-boring or back boring is not a gimmick. When used in conjuction with a properly modified and polished forcing cone as well as super cleaning patterns are improved by 5%. For a serious competition sport shooter, that can be the difference between winning or losing. It becomes a gimmick when sold to hunters as significanly better than a shotgun without such features.
    shotgun-chart-1.jpg

    So, do I buy the 12 gauge or the 10 gauge?.. :confused:
     
  22. kudu
    • Contributing Member

    kudu Moderator Staff Member

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    Unless you are going to be a dedicated goose hunter, go with the 12 gauge, my 10 gauge has not been out of the safe for 15 years other than for a wipe down. No target shooting with a 10 gauge unless you want the punishment. I have the option of using just about anything I want to hunt with, pheasant, the 20 or 28 gauge usually comes out unless they are expected to be far flushing, then 12 gauge, but I would never run 3" shells for upland birds.

    You are over thinking, if you want the 3.5" option, go that route, but 3" shells have come a long way since the first early steel loads. That extra half inch of receiver makes a longer heavier gun. Buy the one that feels the best to you, and you will be happy.

    Patterns will almost always be different even if you have the same exact gun and choke on two separate guns, it is the nature of the beast. You have to determine what your particular gun/barrel combination will shoot by testing different chokes and brands of shells.
     
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  23. cdb1

    cdb1 Member

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    It is a gimmick and as kudu stated you are overthinking it. I’ve contributed all I can to this thread so sayonara.
     
  24. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    I simply cannot in good faith recommend any Mossberg semi-auto. Sorry, look elsewhere and plan to pay more than $600 if you want a reiable semi-auto. With a $600 budget and what you want, you want a pump, and the Mossberg pumps are good choices.

    This also presents some problems with semi-autos, especially gas operated semi-autos. Even more so with 3 1/2" shells. Unlike a pump a gas operated semi uses gasses from the shot fired to operate the action. The barrel length plays a factor in how much pressure is built up. The shorter barrels only work with pretty potent loads, which most people never use. If you buy a semi-auto you want at least 26" of barrel for reliability with a wide range of ammo. If it has to be less than 24", buy a pump.

    The 3 1/2" shells do allow you to throw more shot into the air, and use bigger shot sizes, so it will increase the effective range of the shells. Roughly another 10 yards would be an estimate. This is only an advantage for large waterfowl when using steel shot. But even the most expensive semi-auto shotguns that are designed for 3 1/2" shells suffer reliability with more common 2 3/4" shells, even the "high brass" shells. And the recoil of many 3 1/2" shells match or beat recoil from 458 WM. I'm not going to deal with elephant rifle recoil to kill a 10 lb bird.

    My advice is to stick with a gun that shoots 2 3/4" and 3" shells. Most of those will reliably shoot anything but the most powder puff 2 3/4" loads up to the heaviest 3" loads. If you really need to reach out for long range waterfowl there are other 2 3/4" and 3" "non-toxic" options other than steel that will beat 3 1/2" steel. They are expensive, but unless you are shooting them by the case it is cheaper to buy them than buy a 3 1/2" shot gun that won't reliably shoot the most common ammo.
     
  25. BlondeBear63

    BlondeBear63 Member

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    I have decided stay with Mossberg as I have yet to witness a single one ever have an issue. For instance, my old 500 pump has only one action bar, a plastic trigger guard, and an aluminum receiver. Even as worn as it is, none of those cheap or weak parts have ever failed to perform for the past 50 years. Too, I have grown accustomed to finding the safety on top and thumbing it is part of my shouldering technique.

    Of wanting the 935, many of you are right. I have a fence line with a low area on the other side where coyotes run. I can see them coming but have no shot until a 100 foot opening that turns into the woods. It is almost 60 yards from the cover I have from my back deck. Three inch magnum 00 buckshot is only so effective at that range... I had hopes.

    So I am choosing the Mossberg 930 JM Pro Series with the 22" barrel. I hunt some pretty rugged areas in the mountains, so having a shorter barrel will be an asset.
     
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