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Mountain Lion Shot in Self-Defense

Discussion in 'Strategies, Tactics, and Training' started by .455_Hunter, Aug 7, 2008.

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  1. mr.trooper

    mr.trooper Member

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    Wasn't it just last winter that someone complained of Lion tracks on their property, just a stones throw over the Michigan/Indiana border? The DNR said that they were mistaken, no lions were present, and that the tracks were probably a "dog that got distorted by the sun" or some such crap?

    A few weeks later, they snapped a picture of the lion sitting on their deck, peering through their storm door. DNR said that it was a freak occurrence, and that lions are not present.
     
  2. AJ Dual

    AJ Dual member

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    Indeed.

    DNA hair and spoor had also identified it as the same cat that the WI DNR had been keeping reports on as it made it's way southeast through Wisconsin.

    What I want to know is how it made it's way across the Mississippi. Walked across a bridge, or perhaps swam one of the more reasonable parts way north, or walked across ice, obviously. But it would still be neat to know.
     
  3. ljnowell

    ljnowell Member

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    :what: umm, ok....I guess. :(
     
  4. moooose102

    moooose102 Member

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    i hate cats, all cats. but they dont "freak me out". i am like many of you, if i saw one, it would probably give me a heart attack. the animal that "freaks me out" is bear. any bear. i dont know why, maybe it because with a bear, you know it is capable of killing you, but you have no idea what is going on inside its head. with a cat, if you see it, and it can see you, you know it is going to try to kill you. you know where you stand.
     
  5. wuchak

    wuchak Member

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    I have had no desire to go hiking in cat country since reading the story below. Fortunately Kansas says there are no cougars in the state, except for the one the farmer just killed a couple months ago.


    Killer Cougars

    By Don Zaidle

    A tragic attack in british columbia underscores the failed logic of preservationists who turned mountain lion management into a ballot-box issue

    Feb 1, 2001

    On August 19, 1996, 36-year-old Cindy Parolin and three of her children were riding horses in the Similkameen backcountry, 30 miles northwest of Princeton, British Columbia. Like their mother, 6-year-old Steven, 11-year-old Melissa and 13-year-old David felt a mixture of wonder and excitement as they traveled through the vast wilderness. The four were headed to a cabin to join Parolin's husband and other son for a camping vacation.

    As the family rode along, the horses grew increasingly nervous. The cause became starkly clear when a cougar suddenly launched itself from the undergrowth at Steven. The animal missed its mark, landing on the horse just in front of the boy's saddle. The great cat scrambled to hold onto the horse's neck but lost its grip and fell to the ground.

    Undaunted, the snarling cougar leapt again and attempted to pull Steven from the saddle. This time it got away with only a sock and shoe, but the contortions of the spooked horse caused the boy to fall to the ground. The cat was on the youngster in an instant, wrapping the struggling child in a clawed death-grip.

    Parolin watched the unfolding scene in horror as the cat bared its fangs and then bit into the boy's skull. A knowledgeable outdoorswoman and avid hunter, she knew that her son would be dead in a matter of seconds -- his neck broken, skull crushed or artery lacerated in the lion's terrible jaws. If only she had her rifle...but hunting season was weeks away, and Canadian firearms laws made off-season carry all but impossible. She had to act quickly.

    Screeching a primal scream, the desperate mother leapt from her mount and rushed to Steven's aid.

    With adrenaline-fueled strength, Parolin broke a stout limb from a fallen tree and clubbed the cat away from the child. Now the lion turned its full attention to her, opening a terrible gash on her arm with a swipe of its paw. Spurred by maternal instincts, Parolin fought back. Woman and cougar melded into a blur of flashing claws, teeth and flailing fists as they wrestled on the ground.

    Still thinking of her children, the embattled mother screamed for David and Melissa to grab Steven and run for help. The horses had scattered in the melee, so the older siblings half-carried their bleeding brother more than a mile back down the trail to the family car.

    Melissa stayed with Steven in the vehicle while David ran to a nearby campsite for help. He enlisted the aid of Jim Manion, who, directed by David, drove to the scene. It had now been more than an hour since his mother had clubbed the cat off his younger brother. On arriving, Manion heard the mother's screams. Moving toward the agonized sounds, he came upon Cindy Parolin, still battling the cougar. She turned to Manion, a look of raging defiance in her eyes.

    "Are my children all right?"

    "Yes," Manion answered.

    On hearing they were okay, she said in a half-whisper, "I am dying now."

    Parolin collapsed, but the cat still savaged her body. Although Manion had armed himself with a 12-gauge pump shotgun, he had been afraid to shoot at the cougar for fear of hitting the woman. He fired into the ground nearby, hoping to scare the lion off her limp body. It worked. Now the cougar left the unconscious woman and advanced on Manion.

    As the lion slinked toward him, Manion tried to cycle a fresh round into the chamber but his gun jammed. He backed up toward his pickup, desperately working to clear the weapon as the cougar came on.

    At the last moment Manion cleared the gun and jacked in a fresh round just as the lion charged. With no time to aim, he leveled the scattergun at the cat and fired from the hip. The charge caught the cougar a bit far back, but it was enough. The lion veered off to the side and disappeared into the dense brush along the road. Later, wildlife officers would find the dead animal lying about 150 feet from the trail.

    Manion rushed to Parolin's aid, but she was beyond help, having traded her life for that of her son. Steven survived the near scalping inflicted by the cougar and made a full recovery after receiving 70 stitches in his head. Cindy Parolin was awarded the Star of Courage medal posthumously by the Governor General of Canada.

    http://www.outdoorlife.com/article/Hunting/Killer-Cougars


    Good thing Canadians can't carry handguns at all and rifles off-season.
     
  6. Biker

    Biker Member

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    A brave woman, Cindy was.

    Respect.

    Blue skies and country roads, Cindy...



    Biker
     
  7. Gunnerpalace

    Gunnerpalace Member

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    Cant they are protected by state law,

    Even though there are none here. ;)

    Note: Someone said the DNR would not confirm them because we would have the feds everywhere with the endangered species act. I don't know.
     
  8. Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow

    Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow member

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    Word! That's a heart-wrenching story. THAT's a good mama - she did her duty to save her son.
     
  9. brownie0486

    brownie0486 Member

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    Mom did her best and accomplished her goal to save the kids. Hell hath no furry, as they say.

    Here in Az, there's a large population of cats throughout the state. Can't hunt/shoot em without a permit, but you can defend yourself and livestock from their aggression if need be.

    Several attacks on livestock have been reported in the news since I've lived out here in the last 4 years. We have a horse, we also have a large male mountain lion that winter ranges up and down/along the wash in my back yard at the base of the Superstition Mtns. I've spotted him twice in 4 years, both early morning sightings.

    He'll likely be back again this winter and you don't want to be down back around the wash in the early morning or dusk without much caution and armed. My wife won't go down back to the wash at all at anytime and worried about the horse.

    I've set the property up so that there is a lot of open area between the wash and the corral, they want cover to move in close before an attack, and I've not left him any to the horse. So far, he's not been out of the wash and the brush that hides him well down there.

    Brownie
     
  10. ShelleyB.

    ShelleyB. Member

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    Frightening stories indeed.

    I know there are some species of big cat in Pisgah Forest (Brevard) NC. Our house and property were behind hundred of acres owned by Duke Power. We frequently heard their screams at night and the dogs would get agitated. When they got away and took off into the woods we were always afraid one might not come back home.

    I can't believe we used to go walking through the woods with a lousy .380. Ye gads.
     
  11. TallPine

    TallPine Member

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    One of my "strategies" is to stay out of Canada. :(
     
  12. woof

    woof Member

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    Do you know how many fatal Mt Lion attacks there have been in the entire US since 1890? That's 1890 not 1990, 118 years. The answer is ten. You would do better to prepare for a sasquatch attack, after all they are 8 feet tall and weigh 700 lbs.
     
  13. deaconkharma

    deaconkharma Member

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    Man that made me teary eyed

    What a mother! Senseless she had to die in freaking hand to hand combat with a Big Cat.

    hmph they don't declaw or defang the cats but they sure do it to humans up there don't they? Makes me really sad for this family.

    but hey! if it saves just one life it is good legislation right???? RIIIIIIIIIIIIGHT.....:banghead:
     
  14. Biker

    Biker Member

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    Woof...

    How many non-fatal attacks? Any idea how much damage a big cat can do in a few seconds?

    As a poster whose name i disremember says:

    "It's not the odds that matter, it's the stakes."

    Biker
     
  15. WolfMansDad

    WolfMansDad Member

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    I was shadowed last week by something while running my bird dogs. We were up a canyon in an place where there are lots of deer and some lions. This is in Southern California not too far from civilization, and lions are known to live in the area.

    I have two dogs, one a three-year-old, reasonably experienced hunter, the other just a pup at 18 months. The pup has a good nose, but he is kind of clueless about what's going on around him. The older dog is very sharp and always aware, usually more so than me. The canyon walls are very steep. Even by 7:30 the sun was far from getting down to where we were, and there was still a lot of fog that morning. Well, we get to a bend in the canyon, and pup goes up to investigate some thick cover thirty yards or so ahead. Right quick, he comes running back like the devil himself was on his heels, looking over his shoulder with his tail tucked between his legs and his eyes as big as saucers. That struck me as odd, but I didn't give much more thought to it. About that time I decided it was time to start heading back, since I have to get to work later that morning, so we turn around and start heading back down the canyon. After that, every few minutes, I hear a little rock slide behind me in the cover on the right side of the canyon. Whatever was making it was pretty consistently fifty or sixty yards behind and above me, and if I stopped it would stop. When I would move on, it would follow after me. I never heard any sound of steps or leaves crunching, only the occasional displaced stone falling down the canyon wall.

    This went on for about twenty minutes, and pup just played and goofed as usual. The older dog, however, got more and more nervous, until he finally climbed the other side of the canyon, parked himself on a ledge about forty feet up, and refused to come down. He wasn't stuck, as pup could go up to him and come back to me. He sat there and barked at me until I climbed up to meet him, then we found a game trail and followed it out to the mouth of the canyon. I was getting pretty nervous myself, since the canyon walls are almost vertical, and at one point we had a sheer drop on our right of probably sixty feet down to the canyon floor. The older dog is well trained and consistently obedient, but that day he absolutely refused to go back down into the bottom of the canyon. We have encountered deer, other hikers, and even bobcat together, and whatever was following us was none of those. Both dogs will greet any human they come across, if there are not birds around, and they will chase both deer and bobcat with gusto. (Yes, I am bad. They aren't "trash broke.") Whatever was following us, the dogs wanted no part of it.

    Was it a mountain lion? I can't say, and I really didn't feel like going back to look for pug marks, even if I had the time. I can say that I have never seen the dogs act like that, and I have never been followed by anything in that way before. The area is lion country, though, and people routinely report sightings. Some even get pictures.

    Whatever it was, moving up the opposite canyon wall seemed to have thwarted the pursuit. Once we got on the game trail, I heard no more evidence of anything following us, and the dog calmed down.
     
  16. CJ

    CJ Member

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    Woof said:
    According to http://tchester.org/sgm/lists/lion_attacks.html between 1991 and 2003, in all of North America, they list a conservative 73 attacks (5.6 per year) and 10 deaths (note that this is a larger area than indicated in the initial post). Not scary odds, and they claim that you're 10 times more likely to get killed by a domestic dog.

    But CCW is more like a seatbelt...there for whatever it's needed for...doesn't matter if an SUV head-ons you, or slick ice slides you into a wall. You're not carrying because you're afraid of cats while hiking, you're carrying because you don't know WHAT'S out there...cats, dogs, coyotes, animals that aren't supposed to exist, 2 legged aggressors who feel your family is perfect for whatever they've got in mind, or you need holes strategically placed in some other object for some other reason.

    In the original post, I bet the idea of facing down a cat never crossed the guys mind when we was putting on his holster.
     
  17. cassandrasdaddy

    cassandrasdaddy Member

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    and there is a ceartain number of folk who disappear in the woods and mountains. they don't get counted in the attack stats
     
  18. Guns_and_Labs

    Guns_and_Labs Member

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    Wolves will and do, and there are occasional reports of bears stalking humans.
     
  19. mpmarty

    mpmarty Member

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    Cougar, Bear, Wolf/Coyote Feral dogs makes no difference to me. We hereabouts subscribe to the three "S" principle: Shoot, Shovel, Shut-up.
     
  20. mr.72

    mr.72 Member

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    According to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fatal_cougar_attacks_in_North_America_by_decade

    I count 23 since 1890.

    There are a large number of missing reports that are likely to be fatal mountain lion attacks, but they are unconfirmed as there is no body to evaluate.

    That's still not a huge number, but there are certain activities that substantially increase your odds of being in a mountain lion altercation of some kind... As a mountain biker I know this all too well.
     
  21. Chuck Spears

    Chuck Spears member

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    I strongly disagree. Biologist unanimously agree that cougars don't typically associate humans with prey. Rare instances occur, but they are just that -- rare.
     
  22. Chuck Spears

    Chuck Spears member

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    Wolves are quite timid around humans. Of all the animals capable of killing human beings in an attack, they are pretty much the last one you should worry about. It takes an extremely rare situation for them to kill a human. And even then it is most likely a small unprotected child.
     
  23. Blues Brother

    Blues Brother Member

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    amazing how many states DNR deny the existance of mountain lions/cougars despite the photographic evidence of the cats and their prints.

    I dont get it.
     
  24. Blues Brother

    Blues Brother Member

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    Wolves will attack if they are in packs. If you got a single wolf, it wont stick around long. but if they are in numbers, the will stalk a human if they are hungry.
     
  25. 4v50 Gary

    4v50 Gary Moderator Staff Member

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    Wow! That Canadian woman fought that cat for over one hour. Too bad she didn't have a knife. My condolences to her family.
     
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