Mounting scope yourself vs at store

Discussion in 'Long Gun Accessories and Optics' started by mainecoon, Jun 15, 2019.

  1. mainecoon

    mainecoon Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2012
    Messages:
    468
    In theory, everyone who works at a gun shop should know how to mount a scope. However, I have had two occasions where the guy at the store mounted the scope with the wrong rings. In general, is it better to mount the scope yourself on a bolt gun? I generally let the store do it since I figure they will have more rings available.
     
    LoonWulf likes this.
  2. troy fairweather

    troy fairweather Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2018
    Messages:
    9,559
    Location:
    Up State New York
    i never let anyone mount my scopes, even the rifles with the bases on i don't like, most times there something wrong. i would help out when i was a kid at the gun shop my dad worked, i mounted them as it the were mine. i made some good tip money back then. the one that is shooting the gun has to be there to check the fit.
     
  3. badkarmamib

    badkarmamib Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2016
    Messages:
    2,200
    Location:
    VA
    I mount my own scopes and rings. If I buy a rifle with the scope already mounted, I pull scope, rings, and mounts, and reinstall with thread locker and proper alignment. You would be surprised to see what passes for "factory installed and boresighted"...
     
  4. Steve in PA

    Steve in PA Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2002
    Messages:
    2,653
    Location:
    NE PA
    Let's see.....I've been hunting/shooting for a lot of years. I'm pushing the 6-0 mark......and I've always mounted my own scopes.
     
    Slamfire and LoonWulf like this.
  5. frogfurr

    frogfurr Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2014
    Messages:
    1,331
    Location:
    Preble County, OH
    I'm not an expert on guns by any means. And if I ever meet someone in a gun shop that I felt is knowledgeable enough to mount a scope on my gun I will be more than happy to give them a go. I am kind of thinking finding them isn't ever going to happen.
     
    Engineer1911, 303 hunter and LoonWulf like this.
  6. horsemen61

    horsemen61 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2011
    Messages:
    5,210
    I like to do mine myself
     
    303 hunter and LoonWulf like this.
  7. WrongHanded
    • Contributing Member

    WrongHanded Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2017
    Messages:
    2,341
    When I mounted my first scope, I didn't realize there was a "guy at the the store" who'd do it for me.

    Now, if I were to have anyone do it for me (and I wouldn't, unless I lost a hand), it would be a gunsmith that I trusted.
     
    303 hunter and LoonWulf like this.
  8. berettaprofessor

    berettaprofessor Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2008
    Messages:
    2,819
    Location:
    Kansas
    Mount myself. And no single gun store can beat the online choices for rings (and prices) available to all of us.
     
    LoonWulf likes this.
  9. Yarddog

    Yarddog Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2010
    Messages:
    554
    Location:
    FL.--There's a Gator in the bushes & She's callin
    I mount my own scopes & rings , always to my liken ; )
    Y/D
     
    LoonWulf likes this.
  10. entropy

    entropy Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2004
    Messages:
    12,281
    Location:
    G_d's Country, WI
    Well, yeah-you pretty much grew up working in a gun shop. Having worked in several gunshops myself, I do all mine, and many for friends and family. (though my younger son did his scope on his AR, and I checked his work, he passed with flying colors.)
     
  11. LoonWulf
    • Contributing Member

    LoonWulf Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    13,626
    Location:
    Hawaii
    I do my own.
    There are a couple places, and people i would trust to mount my scopes, but even some of the VERY knowledgeable, and helpful guys at the gun stores wouldnt be allowed to mount a scope for me.

    Also as Troy said, Id have to he there anyway to check fit.
     
  12. edwardware

    edwardware Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2010
    Messages:
    3,232
    Why on earth would you think that? Does the cashier at the grocery store know how to cook the steak you're buying?

    Hang a plump bob, break out the machine levels, do it yourself.
     
  13. Varminterror

    Varminterror Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2016
    Messages:
    9,028
    No retail clock jockey ever gets to handle my firearms or optics, let alone pursue something which could cause damage to them.
     
  14. Dibbs

    Dibbs Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2018
    Messages:
    1,379
    IF I get the scope and the rifle at the same store, and I know the guys doing it, I'll have them install it at the store. Coincidentally, the one time I had it done at the store it was done right.

    You should be able to mount your own scope. It's not rocket science. After you procure a certain amount of firearms, it starts getting awful expensive to go running to a gunsmith for all the small jobs.
     
    sparkyv and LoonWulf like this.
  15. GRIZ22

    GRIZ22 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2006
    Messages:
    5,817
    I've always mounted my own scopes. I can't see how someone else can set up the eye relief for me.
     
    taliv and LoonWulf like this.
  16. Garandimal

    Garandimal Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2017
    Messages:
    2,868
    Location:
    Lee of Death Valley, ...where Tigers feed.
    Line my rings w/ 3M Vinyl electrical tape.

    Try to get a LGS jock to understand that.

    :D




    GR
     
    scubaexplorer85 and LoonWulf like this.
  17. cdb1

    cdb1 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2012
    Messages:
    4,717
    Location:
    Justin, TX
    I worked the gun counter part-time at Cabela’s for two years. We had one guy other than myself I would trust to mount a scope. Since management wasn’t stupid he and I mounted all the optics. I’ve seen mounting jobs from other stores that were a travesty. Learn to do it yourself or take your gun to a qualified gunsmith.
     
    LoonWulf likes this.
  18. Chuck R.

    Chuck R. Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Messages:
    3,238
    Location:
    Leavenworth, KS
    I prefer to do it myself and most of the time my components are purchased on-line.

    I tend to choke up on rifles, so I prefer my scopes a little further fwd than the norm.
     
    Demi-human and LoonWulf like this.
  19. hdbiker

    hdbiker Member

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Messages:
    819
    With the price of scopes I mount my own and lap the rings for proper fit and alignment. I've seen several scope tubes damaged from cheap rings and improper alignment. hdbiker
     
    Bfh_auto and LoonWulf like this.
  20. CoalTrain49

    CoalTrain49 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2014
    Messages:
    4,273
    Location:
    Somewhere in WA.
    Never had anyone mount a scope for me. It just takes a few minutes and I'm going to tweak it for eye relief anyway at the range.

    I do however have a friend who works for a large sporting goods retailer that provides a service for people who buy rifles from him. He will take them to our range, mount the scope and zero it if they need that done. There seems to be an increasing number of shooters who would rather have someone who knows the drill help them. We have a public day at our range and there is always 2-3 old hands there getting people up to speed if they need help. We have some ex military marksmen and armorers who are members. It's a great way to get people into the sport. I've done my share of that and I support it 100%.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2019
    LoonWulf, Slamfire and Mosin Bubba like this.
  21. Mowgli Terry

    Mowgli Terry Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2016
    Messages:
    1,322
    Location:
    Tennesse-former Confederacy
    Here's my story. Back at the dawn of time I was working in a place that sold guns. We sold this citizen a used Browning scope which was currently being sold new. My understanding is this scope was made by what became a major US scope maker. Citizen came back in several weeks later trailing smoke. We had ruined his western hunt because of the defective scope. He could not adjust the power. Citizen brought rifle in. We were out of scope mounts for his rig. He went to a big box. That's where the scope was mounted. When citizen finally fired the rifle the scope slipped forward jamming the power ring into the pot metal see thought rear ring. We would always refer people to a very competent gunsmith who had a 1" bar for adjustment of those pot metal wonders.

    Addendum: I have bought two rifles recently where owner had mounted the scope. One had totally the wrong Weaver bases. The other had mismatched rings. Story works both ways. The first rifle was a Weatherby Vanguard. There's not much excuse for getting the wrong bases on that one.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2019
    LoonWulf likes this.
  22. z7

    z7 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2014
    Messages:
    1,131
    Do it yourself, spend $35 on a torque screwdriver, get decent rings and level the scope to a plumbob, set eye relief to you, in a comfortable and normal shooting position for the gun,
     
    mustanger98 and Ks5shooter like this.
  23. entropy

    entropy Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2004
    Messages:
    12,281
    Location:
    G_d's Country, WI
    I did that for customers at the last shop I worked at. First one I did was a pre-64 Win. Model 70 in .300 H&H a guy was bringing to Alaska, and didn't have time to go to the range himself.(Oh, honey, I HAVE to sight this gun in tomorrow!) I mechanically zeroed it, mounted and boresighted (the correct way; bolt out at 100 yds) then fired the first group (of 3, I only had 20 rounds to sight it in with) just 1/2" left of POA, adjusted it, next 3 were POA, my son fired a 3 shot group, (he wanted to try it, and we shoot the same ) POA again. The customer took his Alaska moose with one in the lungs at @75 yards. I was inundated with rifles to zero for the next 6 months until the (gunsmithing) season was over.

    Ironically, on my AR carbine, which my son scoped, the scope is too far back for me. I grew up shooting unscoped AR's and M16A1's and A2's, so I put my nose on the rear lobe of the charging handle. He'd never shot an unscoped AR until he tried my pistol. I get that 'ring' around the reticle if I just throw the AR up quick; it doesn't change anything for quick shots, and he's got it set dead on (like I said, we both shoot the same for scopes otherwise), so I just leave it be.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2019
    LoonWulf and Slamfire like this.
  24. Hookeye

    Hookeye Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2015
    Messages:
    4,184
    Ive owned a few dozen rifles and shotguns that got optics. Worked in a gunshop for a while too.

    Older....i dont trust myself anymore.....so bought the Wheeler torque driver. And promptly took apart every rifle i had ( 5 of them ). checked base screws and ring screws......was plus/minus a lb from spec....across all of the screws. Yup i still had the touch.....problem is brain doeant trust it now.

    So i use the Wheeler all the time now ( no worries ). The problem with it is the lack of feel.....or the difference in feel. Double check your settiñgs before you twist.

    Also.......use a 1 " rod to check for alignment probs before dropping scope in. Have seen mismachined rings before.

    Never wrecked a scope but watched some others in different shops smoke a few. One a Ruger w diff height rings ...in wrong spots. Guy crunched a vx3 6.5-20x EFR.

    A long time shooter bud just bought some $ stuff. Wants it done. Asked me....as he trusts nobody else.

    LOL even the tradesmen at work bailed when it came to the little stuff inside machines costing a half million or more. I fixed em
    Never got a grievance filed either
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2019
    LoonWulf likes this.
  25. Mowgli Terry

    Mowgli Terry Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2016
    Messages:
    1,322
    Location:
    Tennesse-former Confederacy
    Ruger Rings-DIY: I know this one. Came up with two used Leupold 3x9 scopes. One had Redfield rings an the other Ruger rings. The Ruger rings were two different heights. Both rings were tightened down all the way on one side-top and bottom touching. To top it off the screws had Red Loctite. Gunsmiths used a carbide bit to save scope and rings.

    Addendum: One of the Leupold scopes did not appear right. Scope was sent to maker. Both elevator and windage adjustments were rebuilt. Scope was returned. Evidently one owner completed his work mounting the scope by zeroing the rifle. Both scopes work very well today.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2019
    LoonWulf likes this.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice