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Must Have Books for your Bench...

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Henry45, Jun 21, 2013.

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  1. Henry45

    Henry45 Member

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    Just wanna know what your ''go to'' book is.

    I have the latest Speer, Hornady and Lyman.

    What's your "go to" on plated, and on lead.... ?

    I seem to use the Lyman for lead 95% of the time and the Speer for plated/jacketed...
     
  2. mgmorden

    mgmorden Member

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    I check all of them, but the Speer manual was my first and so I use it a lot. Lyman Cast Bullet Handbook I use for a lot of lead just due to the data volume. Hornady I like the way they list the velocity at different charge levels. Its not completely accurate compared to a loader's gun but it gives a good starting point.

    The only manual that I don't use a lot is Lee's manual. Its a good source of data, but its just not formatted well. Basically its there in case I can't find a load for a particular powder bullet weight combo in another book, I'll check that one.
     
  3. david bachelder

    david bachelder Member

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    I just got the Lyman 49th. It seems to be a book custom taylored to me. So far, I like it a lot.
     
  4. jwrowland77

    jwrowland77 Member

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    I don't shoot a lot of plated and haven't loaded any lead yet, but my go to manuals are the Hornady 8th Ed and the latest Sierra manual. I shoot normally one of those two bullets.
     
  5. steveno

    steveno Member

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    it wouldn't hurt to have a copy of Phil Sharpe's reloading manual also
     
  6. bds
    • Contributing Member

    bds Member

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    For me, Lyman #49 has complimented loads (especially lead loads) not often listed by powder manufacturers' load data.

    I have current Alliant/Hogdgon/Vihtavuori and 2004 Alliant and 1999 Winchester load data printed out in a binder.

    Between the two resources, I have been able to find load data for essentially all FMJ/JHP, plated and lead bullet types for 380/38/357/9/40/45 pistol calibers I load for.
     
  7. tygranch

    tygranch Member

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    I use the current Sierra manuals, cross referencing with a Speer and Lyman.
     
  8. AABEN

    AABEN Member

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    I load a lot of Sierra bullets so my #1 book is Sierra #2 is Accurate because I use a lot of accurate powder #3 is Lyman 49th. I like all three of them. I try loads out of them till I get a good accurate load. I use Winchester 231 powder for 90% of my hand guns I like the Lyman book for that and Winchester that I down loaded.
     
  9. BYJO4

    BYJO4 Member

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    Since I shoot all cast bullets in my revolvers, I use the Lyman manual most often then Speer and Hornady.
     
  10. CPLofMARINES

    CPLofMARINES Member

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    Henry45, you say u have the latest Speer Manual. Is it
    The 14th or 15th edition ?? I was told the 14th is no longer
    In print and the 15th is due out soon. Thank you.

    SEMPER FI
     
  11. Katitmail

    Katitmail Member

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    Well. I'm new to reloading and I'm going to put my flame suit on :fire:

    But..

    I don't think you really need book. You need to read it once to understand what is all involved, it's like 100 pages of info. Lot of it not going to be relevant to what you do. Lot of it common sense. You need to do it once - get it in a library.

    Everybody says "you need book, you need many books and read, read, read."

    I don't know, maybe because I have engineering degree - to me it doesn't look like rocket science...

    Why I say I don't need a book? None of the load data was useful to me. All I did was info from websites and message boards. If you cross-reference with powder manufacturer data - you will get it.

    All technical questions and problems will be answered right here on this forum.

    I have 2 books now - Lee 2nd edition and Lyman 49th edition. I don't feel like I need them - will sell in St Louis :)
     
  12. beatledog7

    beatledog7 Member

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    Katitmail,

    Good idea donning the flame suit.

    It's not, but it's easy to overthink, especially for an engineer.

    Anyone can post load data with no liability or repercussion when it proves dangerous. For example, I could post that my favorite .38SPL load is 6.6 grains of Bullseye under a 148-gr DEWC with a magnum primer. But I won't because THAT'S AN UNSAFE LOAD, yet here it is on the web and in this forum.

    Uh-huh. See above.

    There is a lot of great information here, especially regarding tips and processes, but DO NOT USE anonymously posted load data without verifying it through reputable published sources.
     
  13. Katitmail

    Katitmail Member

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    Absolutely don't just "google" load data. I'm saying that when you cross-reference info from many sources and start low you will figure it out and it's not a huge deal. Problem is - both books I have don't list powder or bullets I use. They have "ballpark" numbers - but that can be obtained from other sources.

    P.S. From what I know now - it's probably better to spend money on Chrono than to buy multiple books.
     
  14. splattergun

    splattergun Member

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    My daughter is an engineer, too. She still uses reference books that she claims to have "memorized", just in case her memory skips a beat. Lives depend on it.

    It's not rocket science, but you are making little grenades designed to go off in very close proximity to your hands and face. Keep your books. Use them.

    Or not.

    Just keep clear of me if you don't.
     
  15. beatledog7

    beatledog7 Member

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    Perhaps a new reloader ought to stick to components for which he can locate published data, you know, just to be safe. When you can't find a recipe for, let's say, 2400 in 7mm Rem Mag, there must be a reason.

    And there is.
     
  16. leadchucker

    leadchucker Member

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    Actually, ballistics is indeed rocket science.
     
  17. Katitmail

    Katitmail Member

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    In case of reloading start low and keep _YOUR_ books. Not books printed. I'm done in this thread :)

    P.S. If you understand dangers, understand principles - you will be fine. I would be more afraid of the guy who doesn't understand what's involved and just follows instructions.
     
  18. wgaynor

    wgaynor Member

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  19. splattergun

    splattergun Member

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    oookaaayyy
     
  20. oneounceload

    oneounceload member

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    All of those are worth nothing without your own diary of your loads, how they performed, chrono data, weather, elevation, wind, etc.

    Without historical records going forward, you won't have the knowledge to adjust, reject, or replicate - KEEP A LOG!
     
  21. bds
    • Contributing Member

    bds Member

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    Different people have different learning curves. The mantra of "you need many manuals and you must read, read, read" is applicable to people who require repeated exposures and are slow to assimilate new information.

    Well, only if you are using bullet nose type listed on the powder manufacturer's published load data as various manuals list bullet nose types not listed on powder manufacturers' load data. You may later use a bullet type not listed on powder manufacturer's load data. If you are using different nose type bullets (FMJ vs JHP or RN vs SWC) for the same bullet weight with different bullet lengths, your seating depths will be different and chamber pressures will vary from the published load data.

    Choose your forums carefully. ;) Here on THR, most members are mindful of posting only published "safe" load data and adhere to placing courtesy warnings when posting unpublished or over max loads - http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=27444

    However, there are other gun forums where unpublished and over max loads are readily discussed and unsuspecting new reloaders unfamiliar with published load data may get misdirected and get into trouble, especially if they start out with max charge loads. :eek:

    Solid buildings are built on solid foundation. Although basic reloading safety principles may not be exciting, they should be practiced until they become second nature and performed automatically without thinking.

    When I help set up new reloaders, I work out a step-by-step checklist (like the pre-flight checklist pilots use) with Quality Control steps built in (like verifying powder measure charge drop weights until consistent) and have them practice the steps until they can perform automatically from memory.

    While I prefer to use currently published load data from powder manufacturers, I do occasionally reference Lyman #49 as current powder manufacturers' load data don't list all the bullet nose types (like FMJ) or to get a "second opinion" and use the lower of the two load data for my start charge.

    Although I don't use the "reloading basics" information at the front of Lyman manual now, I find the load data an invaluable companion to powder manufacturers' load data.
     
  22. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    Currently I use mostly 3 manuals, Lyman 49th Edition, Lyman 4th Edition Cast Handbook and Hornady #9.
     
  23. mike.h

    mike.h Member

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    I have a couple go to's, but I also enjoy Ken Water's "Pet Loads", which is a little dated, but an excellent read.
     
  24. Henry45

    Henry45 Member

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    Marine...

    Yes, mine is #14. It is the latest that is out, until 15 comes along. :) Didn't know it's out of print tho.

    Honestly, i'm in the packaging business, and our machinery has been ''engineered'' to a degree of stupidity. What may be good on paper, just doesn't work sometimes in real life. I would feel much safer beside a beginner, who devoutly uses his publications to get the correct data, than someone who is brazen enough to think his level of intelligence is far superior to the facts that have been time tested.

    But, hey... to each his own. In this world we know, you might get one "uh-oh".... if you remember it after it happens.

    Me, I refer to my manuels. And will 20 years from now, and did when I started 20 years ago, before I had to give it up for alot of years.

    I guess you just find what works for you. Me... it's the books.......... because, we all know, if it's posted on the internet, and forums.... it's got to be the truth.....

    Right????
     
  25. BigBoreJay

    BigBoreJay Member

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    Books, schmooks. I just ask Katitmail what he does.

    Seriously, Lyman #49.

    And seriously, I'm glad Katitmail is 250 miles away from me. I'd sure hate to find myself on the same range as he.
     
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