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My 1st Squib load

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Visionairy, May 24, 2010.

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  1. Visionairy

    Visionairy Member

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    Yesterday I had my first squib load after reloading around 1000 rounds of 9mm & .45acp. I was just wondering what you guys think. I was shooting my glock 36 (.45). The only way I knew anything was wrong was that the next round would not chamber (slide would not return fully forward), which I didn't notice, and when I pulled the trigger no bang. I manually racked several rounds through, each one of them the bullet was set-back.

    Finally I checked the barrel and a bullet was stuck far enough rearward that it was causing the setback on the subsequent rounds. Later on I knocked it out with a rod (wrapped in paper). It came out very easily. I'm just wondering, does that sound like I missed the powder charge altogether or maybe it was just light? I figure if there were any powder in there it would've been lodged further in the barrel. Just want to know so I can adjust my strategy to avoid this in the future.

    The thing that scares me is that I didn't notice anything AT ALL while firing that round, it felt normal and I DID attempt to fire the next round but luckily it didnt work. So, was this KB narrowly avoided or what?!?
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2010
  2. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Powder was missing. Yes, if the bullet was far enough forward in the barrel to chamber another round it would have fired. probably recoiled like heck and buldged your barrel with the low pressures of the .45, but who knows, could have been worse.
     
  3. arizona_cards_11

    arizona_cards_11 Member

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    That is what scares me about squibs. I've yet to have one, but if you reload long enough it's reasonable to assume that something will go wrong eventually.

    You're a very lucky man that the bullet got lodged where it did. If it were at the end or middle of the barrel.......:(
     
  4. ReloaderFred

    ReloaderFred Member

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    A primer alone has the power to lodge the bullet in the leade of the .45. You left the powder out of that round.

    Hope this helps.

    Fred
     
  5. 243winxb

    243winxb Member

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    Bullet didnt clear the muzzle on this 45acp. 45lodgedbullet_1.gif 45lodgedbullet_2.gif KABOOM
     
  6. ljnowell

    ljnowell Member

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    So, the slide cycled and fed the next round?
     
  7. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Sounds from his post like he did not notice it didn't fire and hand cycled the slide.

    I did a little test not long ago trying to show that a squib (bullet stuck in the barrel) can not cycle an action. Until someone runs a test where a squib cycles the action, I can not believe it is possible.
     
  8. shootinxd

    shootinxd Member

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    I had the same thing happen,time to find a process that prevents squib loads.I was double and triple checking for along time after it happened.It's a B*&ch being human!
     
  9. ljnowell

    ljnowell Member

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    Thats what I mean Walkalong. I have never had a round like that cycle the action. It just made me curious.
     
  10. bds
    • Contributing Member

    bds Member

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    Remember, every pistol training class teaches the "Tap-Rack-Bang" drill for any stoppage. For squibs, this drill is not good and result in firing a round behind a stuck bullet in the barrel if the bullet is pushed enough into the barrel.

    As Walkalong posted, from personal experience, I can attest that primer alone can push a bullet deep into the barrel without cycling the slide if the recoil spring is stiff like Glocks (all the expanding gas energy is directed as pushing the bullet into the barrel). If the recoil spring is softer, the expanding gas from the primer will stick the bullet just forward of the chamber and direct most of the energy to the slide (may partially cycle the slide but not noticed by the shooter).

    It is one of many reasons why I have my set of reloading quality control standards to follow before each reloading session. They may seem redundant and time consuming, but sure avoids equipment breakage (Pro Auto Disk chain check, Disk cycle check, powder in hopper check, hopper switch on check, auto-index timing check, first several powder charge verification with scale check, powder in case check).

    Haven't had a squib round for quite a few years now. :D
     
  11. Shawn Dodson

    Shawn Dodson Member

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    Glad to hear there was no damage or injury.

    I experienced my first and only squib load when I first started loading on my RCBS Pro-2000 progressive press. I got distracted and when I returned I operated the press out of order. The slide on my Glock 19 didn't cycle and, yes, I tap, rolled and racked the slide to clear the stoppage, but the bullet didn't go far enough into the bore to allow the next cartridge to fully chamber. I hammered the bullet out with a brass punch.

    I changed my handloading practices (for handgun ammo) to include a visual check of the propellant load as I place the bullet into the case mouth. I haven't experienced a squib since.

    I use a powder checker die when I load rifle cartridges.
     
  12. SCPigpen

    SCPigpen Member

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    This is why I load in steps, 50rds @ a time. After all 50 have been charged I check each one to make sure they have powder @ close to the same amount before I seat the bullets.
     
  13. JustinCglass

    JustinCglass Member

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    had my first squib today...
    good thing I was trying a new load for my carbine
    and noticed it right away
     
  14. Oyeboten

    Oyeboten Member

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    We do well to always be in tune with Recoil...and the cadence of Recoil when present.

    If recoil of a given round is weak or absent, time to pause and check things.

    Handgun wise, when Men used to Shoot one Handed and at Arm's Length, and with no 'hearing protection', one was more likely to notice a difference in Recoil and Report if a 'squib' or failed charge occurred.

    This is still possible even when wearing Hearing Protection...and shooting two handed closer in.
     
  15. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Yep. It just pays to pay attention, always, in everything. :)
     
  16. qajaq59

    qajaq59 Member

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    I've never had a squib in a hand gun. But I did in my .308 once and it was very noticable. But I would imagine a hand gun with a light load might not catch your attenton as readily?
    I'm sure glad that next round didn't chamber for you though. That would have been nasty.
     
  17. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    I loaded my first round in 1962.

    As of 2010, or 48 years later, I have never had a squib from one of my reloads.

    It doesn't have to happen, and it should never happen, if you follow established safety practices when you reload.

    rc
     
  18. qajaq59

    qajaq59 Member

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    All true, but pay attention when you pull the trigger, so you wont have 2 mistakes where you shouldn't even have had one!!!
     
  19. rodregier

    rodregier Member

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    Any unusual sound level or recoil on firing, slow *way* down and investigate.

    The big tip-off for a squib in an autopistol is reduced report on firing and failure to cycle with an *empty* case ejected when you manually clear the slide. The case will probably look unusually dirty or sooty.

    A simple "failure to fire" will result in a complete cartridge including a seated projectile in the case mouth being ejected.

    BTW, a brass rod 11/32" inch diameter (0.344") say 12 inches long makes a beautiful tool for driving a squib out of a 9mm, .38 or .357 barrel along with a small machinists hammer.

    http://www.speedymetals.com/pc-2124-8199-1132-rd-ca-360-brass.aspx
     
  20. Oyeboten

    Oyeboten Member

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    Some Re-Loading Presses will make it difficult to look into each case for evaluating a right level of Powder appearing to be present from automatic Powder Dispensers.

    Or, in progressive Presses, not all have an easy means of being assured every round has got the right amount of Powder, however so.

    I have just been doing things slowly, and checking each Case visually, operating my Manual-hand-Powered 'Ideal No. 5' Powder dispenser, and using bulky Powders...and doing one operation at a time on an older Lyman 'Tru-Line Jr.' Press.

    Years ago, buying bulk re-loads and shooting League events in an Indoor Range, I used to get 'Squibs' now and then, and, also, the occasional seeming 'Double Charge'.

    I also saw other Shooters have 'Squib' events, or, what seemed like 'Double Charge' events where their Guns were damaged from it.

    I feel much happier loading my own! And doing my best, as I continue to learn, to ensure good habits and uniform, reliable results.


    Too, as we all know, a 'Squib' could prove to be an embarassment if one were in a SD situation...regardless of Pistol type, if the Bullet left the Case merely, and were sitting lodged in the Bore.
     
  21. Tallinar

    Tallinar Member

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    For this exact reason that I refuse to use any automated means of pouring powder. I use a progressive press for a few tasks (ie, decapping/resizing/belling, followed by later on the bullet seating and crimping), but I am a strong advocate that you should be pouring powder using a manual measure, then setting each powdered case into a loading tray, and giving the tray a good once-over before proceeding to load bullets.

    Too much is at stake to risk double charges or no-charges.

    I also use an RCBS hand press for priming, as I want to feel for high primers as I insert each one.
     
  22. TonyT

    TonyT Member

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    The only time I ever had a squibb was when I first purchased a Dillon 550 and was experiemnting with various charge weights. Since then I clear the press before changing powder weight.
    I use the Dillon 550 and visually inspect each powder drop before moving the case to he bullet seating station. Knock wood, no problems for the last 10+ years.
     
  23. Sport45

    Sport45 Member

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    I've had a few squibs. When the little square plastic bushing falls out of the powder measure on a 550b it will stop dropping powder. Now I know not to trust the thing and always watch the powder bar cycle and look for powder in the cases when I can. (Tall skinny cases are hard to see in without taking them off the shellplate.)

    In my 1991A1, I can tell you from experience that a primer in an otherwise empty case can send a 200gr cast SWC about 20 feet downrange sometimes. Sometimes the bullet will stay in the barrel. I haven't needed one in a LONG time, but I keep a few primed .45acp cases charged with 3gr of Titegroup topped off with a piece of foam earplug in my range bag, just in case. The foam was removed before I used them.
     
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