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My First Handgun -- Kimber - Is it worth the money?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by ripcurlksm, Oct 8, 2006.

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  1. ripcurlksm

    ripcurlksm Member

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    I am looking for a good .45 handgun and I've found a great Kimber that I like for $1019.00. Is it worth the money for a Kimber?

    Kimber Tactical Custom II
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Autolycus

    Autolycus Member

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    That was the exact model I had. However I paid about $925 + tax for it. I would say it was a great gun. However if your not very familiar with 1911s and handguns I would recomend something else. I would suggest a revolver of some sort. I also had trouble taking the Kimber apart (I was new to 1911s and I was used to Glock simplicity) for cleaning and maintenance.

    My suggestion is to get a revolver or a Glock in 9mm. Its cheaper to practice with and I assume your concerned about money as you are asking if the price is worth it.

    Thats my $0.02
     
  3. S&Wfan

    S&Wfan Member

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    Do a search on Kimbers. They were introduced about ten years ago and were great. Then they went to the Series II models with external extractors that gave problems. The Series II pistols also incorporated an additional internal firing pin safety.

    They are now back to making the Series II pistols with the internal extractors like John Browning intended and things are improving again.

    Their customer service also tanked for a while. Lately it seems to be getting good again, from what I've been reading.

    Mine is the original series, and is the 3" allow frame Ultra CDP that I use for CCW. Mine has functioned flawlessly and shoots very accurately. However, I don't recommend a 1911-type auto for a first defensive handgun.



    FOR YOUR FIRST DEFENSIVE HANDGUN . . .

    Get a good, used S&W revolver. They always go bang, they are very accurate, they don't require remembering to do anything more than aim and pull the trigger under stress and they give great bang for the buck!

    Also, invest in a pair of hearing muffs! They will allow you to learn NOT to flinch, and thus develop fine handgun shooting accuracy and skills.

    You won't go wrong having a Smith, ever . . . and you'd get around to getting several later anyway!;)

    As you master it at the range, you'll meet lots of enthusiasts who'll let you try various handguns. At that time you'll be able to make a much better informed decision about your first auto. They are expensive, and the wrong "fit" for your hand will cause you to be a poor shot.

    Additionally, many autos are pretty crappy (unreliable), and you need to know which ones to avoid. Other autos go bang every time . . . the kind of gun you can stake your life on.


    I don't recommend an automatic to any new shooter. Too much to go wrong . . . too much to remember . . . less inherently safe for a beginner . . . much more expensive generally too.
     
  4. Srigs

    Srigs Member

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    Buy a cheaper gun and use the money saved to buy ammo and training.

    Lots of good 9mms out there. Also you can't beat a S&W K-frame in 38 or 357 for a good accurate gun to learn with.
    I aways recommend you touch, feel and shoot as many guns as you can to try them out. Rentals and friends are well worth the time.
     
  5. MachIVshooter

    MachIVshooter Member

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    1975 was a little more than 10 years ago. Also, the external extractors are only on certin models and, IIRC, are being phased out slowly.

    That said, Kimbers are great production-custom pistols. Awesome fit & finish, and just generally very classy guns. I love my 10mm Stainless target.
    Kimber.jpg

    Also, the 10mm models have ramped barrels with fully supported chambers.
     
  6. fredfellini

    fredfellini Member

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    Perhaps you should pose a similar question on the Kimber forum. I'm sure that there are quite a few poeeple there who have started training with a similar model 1911.

    My first pistol was a Kimber Pro Carry II. Much of what was said above is true. However you can do alot of training as I have, and develop the skill and confidence to use a 1911 semi-auto for CCW, etc. It can be challenging, but once you have mastered the 1911, any other semi auto is elementary.

    Although Kimber has been around mofe more than 25 years, they began producing their 1911 models in 1996. I have one each of the first and second years pistols plus a few more.
     
  7. Josh Aston

    Josh Aston Member

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    The company may have been around in 1975, but they didn't introduce their 1911's until the '90s.

    I've got a Series I Pro Carry, love it. My first handgun was a Smith Model 10 that I quickly grew bored with and traded for a Glock 19. For some the revolver may be a good first gun, but for me I was bored with it by the second outing.
     
  8. ripcurlksm

    ripcurlksm Member

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    ..

    Thanks for the feedback guys, I dont know about the 9mm as a first gun. I am not going to get a big collection of guns like most of you do, with that said, I want to get a powerful gun the first time. I am purchasing it for home defense mainly, and sport shooting from time to time. It also makes me feel a little bit better when I am camping outdoors, there are lots of large cats in california.

    I desire the stopping power of the 45, which is why I am shying away from the 9mm. My next weapon I will be looking into will be a 12 gauge shot gun +slugs for the bears when camping in CA ;)

    Is it possible to regret buying this Kimber 45? I dont think anyone has sold me on purchasing otherwise yet :p
     
  9. plexreticle

    plexreticle Member

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    Buy a glock for half the price an $500 worth of ammo.

    Nothing against Kimber but this as first gun is like buying a BMW M3 as you first car.

    Is it worth the money? Yes

    Will it make you a better shooter? No
     
  10. david_the_greek

    david_the_greek Member

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    I've been in your situation before, and if you are anything like me, youre looking for some positive reinforcement on the choice you've already made in your head. I have to say that my fathers old kimber goldmatch was flawless IMO. I just bought myself a Kimber TLE custom II this week. BEAUTIFULL. everything on it is wonderful. The night sights are awsome, i've never had experience with them before, but they are sweet. Shooting a .45 is not bad either. Its a subsonic round (in general, I'm sure someone makes/reloads some +p stuff) so its less snappy than say a .40. if you got some strength to your hand you'll be fine. BUY THE KIMBER!!!
     
  11. Soybomb

    Soybomb Member

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    The magic is in the shooter and not the gun. Buying a $1k gun won't make you a good shot. Having a .45 won't make you a good shot. .45 won't stop someone when you miss or have bad shot placement. 9mm has quite acceptable performance and is cheap enough that you can practice alot more and you can learn to hit what you're aiming at. To me thats really the most important of having a gun, not the caliber or purchase price.
     
  12. ripcurlksm

    ripcurlksm Member

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    Also, why is it called the '1911'?
     
  13. ripcurlksm

    ripcurlksm Member

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    Much respect for all of your thoughts!
     
  14. 10-Ring

    10-Ring Member

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    Kimber - like any good manufacturer - can produce a nice product. The one you have pictured is a beaut...If it's the one you want & you're willing to commit to it...get it! Just understand you might be faced w/ a pretty steep & long learning curve ;) Good luck
     
  15. cslinger

    cslinger Member

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    1911s can be hit and miss and are more likely to be effected by periods of lower quality control due to them requiring more hand fitting then newer designs.

    The 1911 first came into service in 1911.

    Kimber makes a good gun. They have gone through some quality issues over the last couple of years but I have heard they are back on the upswing.

    If it were me, I would suggest getting a SIG P220 in .45 instead but I am a SIG guy not a 1911 guy. I think I would also be more inclined to buy one of the newer Colts then I would a Kimber at the moment as I think they are building just about the best 1911 for the dollar at this particular moment.

    Chris
     
  16. S&Wfan

    S&Wfan Member

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    David the Greek is right, the Kimbers are fine handguns and . . . if the prospective buyer has his heart set on it, he'll have a very fine first gun. He'll also learn to shoot and handle it safely too, I'm sure.


    I've really enjoyed my original series Kimber ULTRA CDP. Like the Kimber that the original poster is interested in, it too is a "high dollar" 1911 . . . but a real bargain compared to what we used to have to spend to get a great 1911 a couple of decades ago!


    Heck, I don't want to even think about how much it cost to turn a fine, fine Colt Combat Elite into a serious limited 1911 pistol for competitions. Gunsmith work, custom beavertail, match barrel, great trigger job, etc.

    My little 3" Kimber Ultra CDP shucks everything I run through it (rare on a 3" 1911) and is very accurate. Freehand, at 10 yards, it typically will produce a single ragged hole for five rounds! $1,000 1911 handguns can be made to be accurate!

    I have no regrets "wasting" all that money on a gun that may one day be called upon to save my life or someone I love.

    It WILL go bang, and I WILL be able to part the hair on a gnat's head with it.

    It will roll coke cans all day long at 50 yards, and it is nice to have a gun that you know exactly where the bullet will hit.

    It is one my person as I write this, for I just walked the dog. It was on me this afternoon in the deep woods as I checked on my deer stands for the upcoming season. It is on me when I travel within a five-state area (with a CCW of course).

    Here's my Ultra CDP, along with a couple of my BUG and favorite defensive/match revolver:

    [​IMG]

    Enjoy your purchase! I love mine!!!
     
  17. .45&TKD

    .45&TKD Member

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    I have a Kimber TLE that's been great and is my main carry gun.
    Aside from tuning the extractor when I first got it, it has not needed a thing.

    Personally I would not buy one with an aluminum frame nor a Kimber with the external extractor.
     
  18. ripcurlksm

    ripcurlksm Member

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    I just found this interesting quote about Colt .45's

    Kimber is the company who changed the way people looked at M-1911 pistols. As Dick Metcalf wrote in SHOOTING TIMES, "...Kimber has rewritten the book on the 1911 and raised the bar so high for Model 1911 price/features packaging that Colt itself has acknowledged it's a major reason why that company's premium-priced basic 1911 line has essentially disappeared from the marketplace."
     
  19. ripcurlksm

    ripcurlksm Member

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    For the nail in the coffin, I also just read that the frame and slide was developed by Chip McCormick, who shares the same last name as me. I think I have to get this weapon now. :what:


    Does this model have EXTERNAL EXTRACTOR?
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2006
  20. MachIVshooter

    MachIVshooter Member

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    If you have to ask, you need to do a lot more learning before you buy anything.
     
  21. Abby

    Abby Member

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    Hey - Kimber makes good guns. I have their Warrior. It rocks. I've heard great things about the Tactical Custom.

    However, it wouldn't be my recommendation for a first handgun. Of course, if you want one, they're not going to get any cheaper if you buy an appropriate "starter gun" now and wait five years for a big ol' .45.

    If you want one, buy one. BUT - if you're going to put in the practice to become proficient with it, buy a .22 conversion to go along with it. It'll save you a bunch of money and help you learn proper technique with the platform you have.
     
  22. Snake Eyes

    Snake Eyes Member

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  23. Wesker

    Wesker member

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    A first gun for over a grand? Heavens no. Take that thousand and get two or three equally nice guns.
     
  24. anotherinkling

    anotherinkling Member

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    Rent the Kimber. Then, if you like it, go buy one of the new Taurus 1911s for $600. Get good with that, then trade up.

    On the other hand, you don't really say how much experience you have with handgun, just that this would be your first handgun purchase. (I don't/can't own a handgun but have quite a bit of experience shooting them). If you've been shooting for a few years and have the money, go for it. I've had experience with a couple Kimbers and really liked them both.
     
  25. Socrates

    Socrates Member

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    Kimber's strength is in their frame, slide, and barrel. You can get this for about 650 dollars by buying a Kimber Custom II. They use MIM parts in their guns, and, they break. This SUCKS.

    I bought a custom II kimber, used it till the slide stop broke, then called Ed Brown, and ordered every forged Ed Brown part I could fit in the gun, and, thanks to a fantastic pistolsmith, I have them all in the gun, it drives tacks, and cost a little more then the gun you are going to start with.

    Detonics makes a 1911 that is MUCH easier to break down for cleaning, a better design, and more accurate, for about the same price.

    http://www.detonicsusa.com/model91101.html
    [​IMG]

    Dan Wesson CZ also makes some great 45's, the bobtail in particular.

    But, the best of bunch, as far as I'm concerned is S&W, or Sig, 1911's.
    http://www.smith-wesson.com/webapp/...d=10001&productId=14725&langId=-1&isFirearm=Y

    [​IMG]
    The S&W, with the scandium frame, is super strong, and light, plus, they use
    all forged parts, IIRC. Likewise Sig makes a 1911 that is all forged parts, and, if it's like any of the other sigs, will be an incredible shooter, in the same price area.

    http://www.sigarms.com/Products/ShowCatalogProductDetails.aspx?categoryid=25&productid=55

    [​IMG]


    So, no, I would NOT spend a grand on a custom II, that has all MIM parts.
    I would spend that same grand on a S&W, Detonics, or Sig, 1911 with forged parts.

    You've made a poor choice.

    S
     
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