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My first slamfire.....

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by ShroomFish, Jan 29, 2013.

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  1. Krogen

    Krogen Member

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    If the gun is "best known for not firing at all" and you now have had an "unplanned" discharge, I'd sure think twice before keeping it as a home defense gun. :what:
     
  2. Analogkid

    Analogkid Member

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    HMMM? I have several of the Bryco 9's, Jennings 9's and even a Jimenez 9.

    How did you accomplish this? I don't even think there's a way to put them back together wrong and have that happen.

    Was the Booger hook on the Bang switch when you *Racked one in the pipe*?
     
  3. Spammy_H

    Spammy_H Member

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    I'd detail strip the slide and see if there's any gunk in the firing pin channel, or some other obstruction keeping the pin protruding forward.

    I'm sorry to hear of your accident. I also disagree that this was a negligent discharge. If you don't pull the trigger, it shouldn't go off. Having said that, I agree that perhaps the ceiling might not have been the best direction to point when releasing the slide.

    Having said that, I could see myself doing the same thing.

    A friend of mine gave me this advice: Field strip & clean after every range trip, detail strip & clean once a year.
     
  4. CLP

    CLP Member

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    Does anyone know much about this handgun which would explain why or how this could have happened?
    After I take my Glock to the range I clean it (not a detail strip), and since I use it for HD I load it before I store it. I do this indoors and pointed in a safe direction with finger off the trigger. I couldn't imagine this happening unless the firing pin had some inertia or there was a high primer. Do you reload? I can't imagine the flack I'd catch from my wife for ruining her floor if that happened with me. I'd be banished to the basement permanently.
     
  5. c4v3man

    c4v3man Member

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    Never heard that one before... it's not like "extra lube" makes it extra slippery... What design would possibly rely on metal-to-metal friction/stiction (which constantly changes depending on dirt/temperature... both of which constantly fluctuate in a firearm) to keep the firing pin from contacting a live primer?

    The only problem extra lube should cause is perhaps rendering the loaded cartridge's primer inert if it's penetrating lubricant, or am I wrong?
     
  6. Spammy_H

    Spammy_H Member

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    I'll preface my comments by saying that I have no familiarity with a Jennings/Bryco specifically. However, I am familiar with striker fired weapons in general, owing and shooting several of them, in addition to hammer fired weapons:

    The problem with lube in the firing pin channel is that oil attracts dirt. The channel gets gunked up and the firing pin sticks. In a striker fired weapon, the firing pin in spring activated. Since the spring forces the pin forward, it's more likely to get stuck in the forward position, causing a slam fire.

    I've always read to never lubricate the firing pin / firing pin channel for this reason. Clean it, but don't add lube to it.
     
  7. rodregier

    rodregier Member

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    Question:

    Was there a mark on the primer? (There is also an uncommon phenomena called a cocked primer.)

    (Portable) products are made to create a safe backstop indoors for loading and unloading autopistols.

    http://safedirection.com/
     
  8. Silent Bob

    Silent Bob Member

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    Negligent to load a semiautomatic firearm in the house? That's a new one on me :rolleyes:

    I guess only people in remote rural areas are allowed to load their semiautomatic firearms indoors.

    Apartment dwellers like me are just SOL. Time to turn 'em in, I guess.
     
  9. CLP

    CLP Member

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    Cocked primer? What's that? Primer not fully seated?
     
  10. Ragnar Danneskjold

    Ragnar Danneskjold Member

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    Not negligent. Inserting a magazine and releasing the slide to chamber the first round is SOP for millions of gun owners. Nothing wrong with it. If that is indeed all the OP did, there's nothing negligent about it. The gun suffered a mechanical malfunction and fired when it should not have. That's a true Accidental Discharge, not Negligent.

    See if it's still under warranty. If so, send it in to get it checked and fixed.

    This. A firearm that isn't mechanically reliable is not fit for any sort of defensive use. Period.
     
  11. Ryanxia

    Ryanxia Member

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    Glad no one was hurt.
     
  12. Lupinus

    Lupinus Member

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    Failing to see how loading a home defense gun inside the house is in itself negligence.

    Pointing it in an unsafe direction or doing so improperly is negligence.
     
  13. sixgunner455

    sixgunner455 Member

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    Keep the AR for HD.
     
  14. ShroomFish

    ShroomFish Member

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    @Ragnar Danneskjold, The reason I kept this weapon for HD is because with out 500 rounds down the pipe I have never had a issue with it, I also call it the last resort since I keep my PA-459 beside my bed also..
     
  15. ClickClickD'oh

    ClickClickD'oh Member

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    Yup, definitely negligence then...
     
  16. Analogkid

    Analogkid Member

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    I Don't doubt you have 500 rounds through it.
    I have a well documented 3k plus through one of mine. I'd do another tear down and make to sure you dont have something lodged in the pin.

    Make sure to see is the Firing pin is sliding freely. Use a drop of rem oil to ensure it is lubricated.
     
  17. jdex

    jdex Member

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    I believe you, I had the same thing happen to me with a star 9mm, went through a closet and file cabinet though.
     
  18. Slamfire

    Slamfire Member

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    Looked at the Jennings 9mm parts at this page
    http://www.gunauction.com/buy/10592...bryco-jennings-nine-9mm-parts-w-slide-and-mag

    looks to be a striker fired mechanism, I don’t see a hammer anywhere.

    If the pistol slamfired than it is most likely you have a mechanical issue. With rifles I call it following, the sear did not hold the striker back and the striker and slide both went forward.

    Bang. :what:

    This is very serious as the thing can go off out of battery, and then you will have gun parts and brass particles all over the place along with a hole in the wall.

    This pistol is not worth the gunsmithing to make it reliable, you are better off getting something better.

    I found some parts availability, but ..........

    http://www.homesteadparts.com/shopcart/Jimenez_Bryco_Jennings_9mm.htm
     
  19. c4v3man

    c4v3man Member

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    I've heard the same thing as far as lube. Guess dirt jamming the firing pin forward didn't strike me as a problem attributed to lube, but I can see it being put that way.

    The "decorative bucket of sand" sounds like the way to go... a lot cheaper than those bullet catchers/tubes I've seen at various gun shops I'd assume.
     
  20. Somewhere in NM

    Somewhere in NM Member

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    ShroomFish, good job keeping it pointed in a safe direction. The safety rules are made to be redundant so even if one is accidentally broken or there is an unexpected malfunction (your case) no one gets hurt.

    I would get rid of the gun and buy something more reliable. Everyone has their own preferences. I prefer SIGs because of their reputation for reliability and because I don't trust myself to safely/effectively manipulate a manual safety iin a high stress situation. Others like Glocks, and others have the 1911 manual of arms permanently grooved into their brains so it is best for them.
     
  21. RetiredUSNChief

    RetiredUSNChief Member

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    Can't help you with the ringing ears...that's something only time will tell on. If it keeps up for very man more days, though, you should see a doctor. At any rate, you should see a doctor to document the extent of your hearing damage.


    I CAN help you with the hole patching, though!

    First of all, the ceiling is the LAST thing you need to worry about right now. Get up in the attic and find out where that bullet went. If it lodged in a ceiling or roof joist somewhere, then you're done with that. Maybe dig it out for a souvenir if you want.

    Make sure no electrical wiring or plumbing was damaged...repair it if so. Same for any other collateral damage you may find to any other structure.

    If the bullet went through the roof, then get up there and patch it. It's a simple matter of using a flatbar to carefully pry up the damaged shingles and seal the damage with tar paper and another shingle. Caulk the hole, too.

    THEN fix the hole in the ceiling. That's a simple spackling job and paint touchup. The texture can be made to match the existing ceiling texture easily enough...and given the size of the hole, it's not going to be noticable to anyone after you paint over it, either.

    Have fun!

    :neener:
     
  22. 230RN
    • Contributing Member

    230RN Marines raising the left-leaning Pisa tower.

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    I have a shelf full of old real books for that purpose. I used to keep an old expired vest on the wall for an indoor "safe direction," but it looked like heck hanging there all the time.

    So I just rearranged a shelf on my bookcase with "expendable" books and it fits in with the decor better. The length of the shelf is accessible from the side so that's the side I point the gun at. Any bullet would have to go through 2 1/2 feet of books to escape.

    However, I still don't like manipulating a gun indoors.

    I do it, but I don't like it.

    I also strongly distrust SA striker fired handguns.

    I have 'em, but I don't like 'em.

    Terry, 230RN
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2013
  23. General Geoff

    General Geoff Member

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    I would agree with this only when it pertains to a firearm which you know to have a floating firing pin. Chambering a live round should pose zero risk of discharge in most modern pistol designs.

    It is, however, prudent to have a 5-gallon bucket filled with sand, to point a firearm at while chambering a round in the house. :)
     
  24. swalton1943

    swalton1943 Member

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    jennings, ugg.

    Bought a .22 Jennings at a local gunshow. Fired two rounds; the third shot made the gun blow up in my hand. Bit of case in my face; chip in my glasses in front of my eye. Stay away from them.
     
  25. Dmath

    Dmath Member

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    I once a had a Remington .22 pump that would slam-fire with every single round. I was too young and ignorant to realize I should check out the firing pin. Then somebody solved the problem for me by stealing it. I heard no complaints, though.

    As to the idea that a firing pin with no return spring has enough mass to detonate a primer – I doubt it. Somebody on another board demonstrated that pretty convincingly with a 1911 slide with barrel, primed case, and loose firing pin, all held together and dropped, muzzle-first, inside a 15-foot length of PVC tubing. He also calculated that for a gun to fire in those circumstances, it would have to be dropped on its muzzle from a height of several thousand feet or something. . . . of course, this does assume that the hammer is down, not cocked and therefore not under spring pressure and only being held back by the sear. But, hammer down, a loose firing pin does not have the mass to detonate a primer.

    In this case I would expect that the firing pin hole had some crud in it, holding the pin slightly protruding.
     
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