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My Grandfather's Mossberg 146B-A

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Shae1324, Nov 2, 2017.

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  1. Shae1324

    Shae1324 Member

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    When my grandfather came home from WWII he was in search of an all around good squirrel and rabbit gun. The Mossberg 146B-A model was made in (no guesses here) 1946 only. It came with a peep sight and a forward selector sight with an option for a scope. A Mossberg man from way back, he picked it up, and there wasn't a small varmint in Onslow County that was safe from him with it in his hands.

    In 1970 my father, a boy of ten years old, inherited his daddy's squirrel gun. The scope was long gone but the peep sight and selector sights with the hood were intact. It was his first of many rifles that he would own through out the years but it was his favorite for small game and general plinking for as long as he can remember, and right up until I turned ten years old.

    Even though I was a girl, the rifle was once again passed to me on my tenth birthday. By then the stock had it's fair share of scratches and dings, but man was the bore bright and the action smooth (still is). We would go to the gun range near camp Lejuene and my father would make bets with the young Marines there, the scope of the bet being whether or not I could hit a nickel at 50 feet with that rifle, and we never lost a single time that I can remember. The trick is to watch for the glint of the sun on the coin.

    It wasn't until I was grown that I understood that the peep sight on my old rifle was what most would consider sub-par. My buddies would pick it up at the range and they couldn't hit doodley squat with it. Most of them still can't and are still amazed when I shoot the red dot out of Marlboro pack with it at fifty paces. I have learned that this rifle in particular takes more than just a a little practice and patience but it pays off in spades in the long run. You really have to be in tune with it, and if you can get there, it will drive tacks.

    Mostly I've just learned that you can't put a price on that old rifle. They sell nowadays for 150 bucks easy, even with all the accessories. Someday my son or daughter will own this rifle, and will carry on this family tradition, but for now, I wouldn't sell it for anything in the world. If you count yourself among one of the handful of owners who has one in this good of a condition, then you probably understand what I'm saying anyway. I have inherited and purchased many other firearms, all of them being more powerful and refined. But no matter what I've got in the gun case, the old Mossberg is still my favorite. So if you happen across one, inherit one or whatever the case may be...stick it on the rack and hang onto it.
     
  2. ontarget

    ontarget Member

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    Very cool story. I always enjoy the back stories on inherited or passed down guns. Funny how the most cherished guns in our collections are very rarely the most expensive or most valuable. Some are just plain priceless.
     
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  3. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    Shae1324

    Great story on your family heirloom. Sort of reminds me of my first rifle: a Ruger 10/22. Nothing fancy or high tech about it, but can it shoot! Use to hit 25 cent pieces with it at 20 yards with the iron sights (that "trick" with the sun glinting off the coin really works!).

    Someday it will be my daughter's rifle and I hope she'll pass it down to her kids when the time comes.

    Thanks for sharing.
     
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  4. Scooter22

    Scooter22 Member

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    Great story on a great gun. I collect Mossberg .22s and have 2, 146B, s along with a bunch of other models. A complete one with sights easily sells in the 2-400 range depending on condition. Usualy the higher end. The old Mossbergs were sleepers but not any more. They now fetch 2, 3 4 times what they did 5 years ago depending on model. Enjoy yours. I do mine. Good shooting!
     
  5. 22250Rem

    22250Rem Member

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    Nice story and thanks for posting. Those guns are what I call " heirloom" guns. They're usually not real expensive high end pieces but they're priceless to their owners. I've got a few of my own from my dad, an uncle and an older cousin. I've only seen a few of those older Mossberg .22's ( don't recall the model numbers) but those that I've seen were all outstanding examples of fine accuracy. But in all fairness I have to admit that an awful lot of those old .22's from that era were also very accurate. That peep sight sure makes a difference in accuracy vs. open sights and they're great to have on .22's. Where those old .22's really shine is that you could put hundreds of thousands of rounds through them and never wear the bore out. Like the Mod. 67 Winchester my dad got back in the mid to latter 1930's that had an enormous amount of rounds through it since then and the bore is still beautiful. That way your children or grandchildren can someday inherit a nice 22 with a mint bore.
     
  6. d2wing

    d2wing Member

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    Nice. I bought one from a friend a few years ago that no longer functioned. A thorough cleaning and repair of the lift mechanism, and a little refinishing and it was a sweet rifle. I gave it to my Son in law. He really likes it.
     
  7. Shae1324

    Shae1324 Member

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    Thank you very much. Yeah those Rugers' are another one well worth it, time tested and true. I hope your daughter enjoys it as much as you obviously have.
     
  8. Shae1324

    Shae1324 Member

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    I can totally understand why they fetch a little more these days. Like most things, "new and better" can be attractive, but the old reliables still have their place. I have a few others that I'm partial to such as the Marlin 39A (gold trigger), Scoremaster 511, Ruger 10/22, all very good reliable weapons. I just have a habit of grabbing the Mossberg a.k.a. the "critter-getter" when I have a need for it. :)
     
  9. Shae1324

    Shae1324 Member

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    Those weapons from "back yonder" were reliable and put through their paces by our forefathers. I can't imagine a better weapon than one that has been put through every condition imaginable, and aced the test well enough to be passed down to me. If it was good enough for my grandpa then it's good enough for me. I'm glad to see that there are others who know exactly what I mean. Thank you for the nice comment.
     
  10. Saleen322

    Saleen322 Member

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    I'll never get rid of this one. One of my favorites...

    38453300776_772e827bf9_o.jpg
     
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  11. Clark

    Clark Member

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    I saw this rifle at a gun show and thought it as a Winchester for $500.
    I reached for the wallet and said I will take it.
    The guy said, "Fifty bucks", and I got it and looked at it, and it said "mossberg".
    Sometimes I just stumble into things.
     

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  12. Crowcifier666

    Crowcifier666 Member

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    I have a 142A that was my first .22 rifle.

    Great story.
     
  13. 13Bravo

    13Bravo Member

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    Cool story. My family didn't pass down guns, Grandad had only a .22 and a 12 ga, both long gone I suspect. I appreciate the family connection and memories though, of which I have plenty. 5 years out of the Army I have a respectable collection of Mossbergs and the 146b with it's funky T-bolt is my favorite. I passed on another yesterday at a gun show. A complete rifle for $375 asking price. I'm sitting here having an internal tug-of-war on whether to take the 45 minute drive to see if it's still there.

    Thanks for the cool story.
     
  14. Clark

    Clark Member

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    My grandfather had a lever action 30-30 in the Alaskan Gold rush, and left it there.
    My father had a bag full of odd handguns in WWII Italy, and left them there.
    When my parents died, I was executor, but before I got there the guns, jewelry, and furs seemed to disappear.

    You are going to have to find your own guns.
     
  15. DannyLandrum

    DannyLandrum Member

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    Love the story - great looking rifle, too.
     
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