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my opinions on the colt 1860 army and remington 1858

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by jason41987, Dec 9, 2012.

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  1. wap41

    wap41 Member

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    1860's

    I have three original 1860 colts and two 1960 new army colts made in belgium in the 1960's They are hard to find but very high quality better steel different rifeling .451`diameter and very accurate makes them worth the effort to find one.But when all is said and done I still prefer my ROA'S
     
  2. YumaKid

    YumaKid Member

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    All this talk of Remington cylinders binding; and I've yet to experience either of my REmingtons doing so, and I've swapped around my 4 cylinders (I like spares) so often that it's hard to tell which one came with which revolver. Now sometimes I've felt a cylinder drag when I'm pulling out the pin; but I just blast it with some brake cleaner (EDIT: The PIN, not the cylinder), wipe it with an old washrag, and let it thoroughly dry while reloading the cyinder. A little dab of Ballistol or a light swipe of bore butter (whatever is closer), and I'm back to makin' smoke!

    But never have I had it bind up while cycling the action...... maybe I just need to shoot more???? :rolleyes:
     
  3. raa-7

    raa-7 Member

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    I can only say that I like the Remington.But I only have the Remington :p :rolleyes:
     
  4. BigG

    BigG Member

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    I have a Replica Arms 1860 Army with the long fluted cylinder. Its code is XXV for 1969 and the maker is Uberti. It's a beautiful piece.
     
  5. BHP FAN

    BHP FAN Member

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  6. BHP FAN

    BHP FAN Member

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  7. BHP FAN

    BHP FAN Member

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  8. BHP FAN

    BHP FAN Member

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  9. BHP FAN

    BHP FAN Member

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  10. BHP FAN

    BHP FAN Member

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    I like both, but prefer Remmies.
     
  11. Old Dragoon

    Old Dragoon Member

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    I have owned several of originals and repro's of both the 1851, 1860, 1861 Colts and the Remy's.
    In my experience the Colts all handle better than the Remy's. Due to one word. BALANCE.
    I have small hands and found it hard to reach the hammer of the Pietta Remy's, Had no problem with the Uberti's or Euroarms.....Or the originals! Pietta's are just bigger overall. I did find that the conversion cylinders I had for the Uberti's will work in the EuroArms, also found they would work in the originals I had. BP Cylinders swapped between them also worked.
    I really like both the Colts and Remy's, but my favorite of all is a 1851 Navy Colt. Would love to put Navy TG and Back strap n grips on a 1860 NMA and just see how that feels.
    I feel that the Navy is the best all around, but only a 36 Cal.
     
  12. rcflint

    rcflint Member

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    Hoof Hearted. I remember from many years ago in a collector's club in New York State, seeing Remington Revolving Rifles with the hole drilled as you describe. I recall that it was not done on 44's but only 36's, though my memory may not be serving well, as I saw them in the early 60's. (1960's, that is).

    It could have been seen as a pressure relief due to the long barrel, and we theorized at the time it was to minimize the gas cutting of the topstrap at the cylinder gap, which was severe in some well used original revolvers, and the longer barrel may have torched the topstrap for a longer period.
     
  13. Hoof Hearted

    Hoof Hearted Member

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    TEXAS! By God.....
    I sure hope the OP doesn't see this as a hijack of his thread (and it has gone off track a bit here and there...)

    RC
    This is interesting info and I never paid attention to the different calibers but I do not see where it would hurt for the BP shooter to explore this "vent hole" in looking for ways to minimize fouling of the clinder and pin. It might make a large difference for the SASS BP shooter who uses some of the dirtier powders like Goex.

    HH
     
  14. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Member

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    I've handled and shot them all and for me, the Colt's are more comfortable and handle better. Whether it's the 1851 or 1860 vs. the 1858; or the SAA vs. the 1875/1890.
     
  15. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    One complaint in the CW era was that fired caps could hang up the Remington if they fell into the action. The Colt, on the other hand, could be cleared by turning it upside down and shaking it.

    That led to the habit of Colt-armed troopers pointing the gun back over the shoulder, shaking it while cocking it, then bringing it forward and down. And that led to the use of the same technique with the Single Action Army and even with the .45 pistol through WWII. Shooters were taught to "raise pistol", then to bring the gun down on the target. Not only a poor way to pick up the target, but when the inevitable happened on civilian ranges, the bullet went over the backstop.

    Jim
     
  16. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    Which is where the term "throw down" came from. As in; "He made the wrong move and I threw down on him." In early western movies, later played on TV, actors would point they're six-shooter back over their shoulder and then swing it down to aim (?) and fire. They didn't have the slightest idea why but someone told them too do it. :D:
     
  17. drjohn

    drjohn Member

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    That’s very interesting about the raise, point and fire style and makes a heck of a lot of since, historically and origin wise. I just got an older Armie San Marco clone of the 1860 Colt, my brother and nephew got 58 remeys. Brother a new pietta and nephew an 1977 Lyman which I understand to be a San Palo, now Euro arms. Like someone earlier said the Pietta does feel bulkier than the Lyman and the cylinder will not fit the Lyman, as if every part on the Pietta is just a fraction larger. The San Marco Colt on the other hand feels like it is an extension of my hand, or like being re introduced to an old friend. I took, and still take, a lot of ribbing from them for buying a “topless” pistol. I may pick up a Remington some day but there will be another colt first. Another 1860, this time in steel frame, or a Navy… hum…choices choices.
     
  18. MIOkie

    MIOkie Member

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    Hello Everyone.

    I've been into the BP revolvers for five years or so now.

    My first purchase was an overpriced, stainless Remmie from Bass Pro.
    Beautiful Pietta clone. I went with that because of the simple design and ease of disassembly.

    Then, with all of your experience and insight I gleaned from this forum, I was confident enough to go for the Open Top... a Pietta 1860. That thing fits like a glove. It also compelled me to learn a little basic gunsmithing.

    That being said, in the effort to go even bigger, last year I went for the Walker clone.
    Needless to say, when it arrived it received my undivided attention on the shooting range.
    Well, after a full afternoon of two-handing that Thing with a permanent grin pasted on my face, I looked over and saw my already loaded 1860 sitting there on the table, patiently waiting. I figured that would be the way to properly end my session.

    Well, one-handed at thirty yards I couldn't miss the paper plate even had I tried!
    It seems the Walker served as "practice weights" making the 1860 seem like nothing.
    It made a great shooter even better (the 1860, NOT me).
    The grin turned to a full smile as for a six shot period in time I felt invincible.

    To make a short story long... I loves me 1860!
     
  19. rio nueces

    rio nueces Member

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    To each his own.
    To my mind, nothing beats a 5 1/2" Remington for handling.
    And I like Pietta, the new ones. Mine is extremely accurate with full loads round ball and shoots to point of aim. I have no problem with correctly sized caps falling off and jamming the action.
    I do have to remove the cylinder and wipe the pin down after 10 or 12 shots though. I've no problem with that.
     
  20. dickydalton

    dickydalton Member

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    I really like my Pietta 1860 but my Pietta 1858 5 1/2" outshoots it and is fun now that I filed off the sharp corner of the trigger.
     
  21. Jaymo

    Jaymo Member

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    I like them all. I don't like the looks of the 1860 Colt as much as the Remington, or as much as I like the other Colts.
    That wouldn't stop me from buying one, though. My problem with it is that the grip doesn't feel right in my hand.
    Then again, I've only handled Ubertis.
    The Ruger Super BH grip doesn't feel right in my hand, either.

    Now, if I could get a Bisley 1860 Colt repro, I'd jump on it in a heartbeat, as the Bisley grip feels great to my hands.
    Funny thing, the 1862 Colt Pocket Police looks great and feels great to me.
    Guess it's a scale thing.
    I do like the 1860 Army, when it's had the barrel chopped by about 2-3 inches.
    The grip still doesn't feel right to me. Shame. Maybe I should get one, chop the barrel, and install a Bisley or bird's head grip.
     
  22. kituwa

    kituwa Member

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    I am not real particular about grips on cap and ball revolvers,i can do with any of them but i do like the 1860 colt grip the best.On ruger single action guns though,i like the bisley hands down.If you had a bisley grip frame on a dragoon i think that would be the cats meow for sure.
     
  23. shafter

    shafter Member

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    I much prefer the 1860. It's a natural pointer and feels very comfortable. If you've got a strong thumb it takes down in just a second or two really easily. I also find them easier to clean since the barrel comes off.

    Plus a steel frame Colt is plenty strong for what its designed for.
     
  24. Hellgate

    Hellgate Member

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    I started out as a dyed in the wool Colt fan where my best guns are 44 Colt '51 Navies that I use when I seriously want to do my best in a CAS match that I feel counts. but over the years I have grown to appreciate the various Remingtons. What I gound it they vary considerably between manufacturers. The Pietta Remingtons are bigger (heavier) and seem more clunky to me. The Euroarms are like the Colt Navies: lighter and more pointable but not good for beefy hands. The Uberti Remingtons are in between in feel. To me, it's almost a tossup. The Remmies will accept heavier powder charges and any shape projectile whereas the various Colt clones may or may not take a conical without using an external loader. Original Colt 1860s were much roomier under tha rammer for the paper cartridge conicals issued suring the Civil War. The Colt Navy is the most natural pointer with the Euroarms and Uberti Remington tied with the 1860 Army.
     
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