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national arms revolver

Discussion in 'Firearms Research' started by bear bulldog, Jul 20, 2011.

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  1. bear bulldog

    bear bulldog Member

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    You'll have to excuse my ignorance about guns, I'm a pilgrim.I inherited two national arms pistols from my father and just trying to find some info about them. I believe them to be 32 cal. teat fire. one has ivory grip with serial #25555. the other a walnut grip serial#30073. besides this info thats all I know
     
  2. Ron James

    Ron James Member

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    O.K. This one that will require clear pictures to be able to give you any valid identification. National Arms is a name used several times, however if your firearm is a Teat Fire made by the National Arms Co. in Brooklyn, N.Y. then it is a very rare gun and in good condition will bring several thousand dollars. However, Pictures will be required to correctly identify the firearms before anyone can say yea or nay.
     
  3. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    The Moore teat-fire was one of several systems made to evade the Rollin White patent, which S&W had bought, covering a revolver cylinder with chambers bored all the way through.

    Some of the teat-fire guns are quite rare and valuable, like the .45 caliber. The .32 caliber guns are fairly common (30,000 made) and sell for around $700 in excellent condition, less in average condition. One or two can usually be found at a large gun show. They seem to have been fairly popular and almost all I have seen show signs of considerable use.

    Not for plinking, though. Ammo runs around $10 or more a round, if you can find any. There are two kinds (not interchangeable) the round teat and the flat teat, which are just as the terms describe them.

    Jim
     
  4. Ron James

    Ron James Member

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    Alas, Jim as usual is correct, it is the 45 that is ultra rare , however the .value of the 32's is not pocket change. give us some pictures of what you have.
     
  5. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    I bought another Moore at the Baltimore show last year for (I think) $650, in very good condition. But I don't quite understand the look the seller gave me when I asked if he would throw in a box of ammo.

    Jim
     
  6. bear bulldog

    bear bulldog Member

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    National arms revolver update

    I have some attachments and I hope this works, not sure it will. Here are the revolvers we were talking about today. I would like more feed back if possible. Mark
     

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  7. Axel Larson

    Axel Larson Member

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    I do not know much about them but those are some stylish lookin pistols you have there. I would be interested to know why they stopped making them.
     
  8. Remo223

    Remo223 member

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    open top spur trigger revovler with cumbersome reloading? that's 3 reasons why they quit making them.
     
  9. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    Not much to tell. You can see how they load and the gate that keeps the rounds in place. Those are the later model with the ejector and would use the round teat ammo. The early guns were sold with a rod to push out the empties and used flat teat ammo that had to be loaded right or the round would not seat fully.

    As I said, ammo is hard to find, but turns up at the bigger gun shows. It is worth it to have at least one round to show folks how the guns worked.

    The reason they quit making them, of course, was that the Rollin White patent expired and anyone could make a revolver with bored through chambers to use the obviously superior rimfire and center fire ammunition.

    Jim
     
  10. bear bulldog

    bear bulldog Member

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    hidden trigger pistols

    the pilgrim would like some more info please, in the collection I have there are a pair of Larranca Elbar pistols they appear to fire a pinfire cartridge. besides this I know nothing about them . I would appreciate some input. I've included some pics thanks mark
     

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  11. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    They are Spanish (Eibar was/is a major arms making center in the Basque area of Spain) and are pinfire. They likely were made before c. 1880. Those double barrel pistols are sometimes called "Garruchas" or "Brazilian pistols" because that nation was a major market for the type, and in fact ones for conventional ammunition are still made there. It is my understanding that Brazilian law bans the sale of repeating pistols (revolvers or auto pistols) to native peoples, so double barrels are common.

    Value? I would guess at about $200 for the one with an intact grip; under $100 for the other.

    Jim
     
  12. oldtoolmaker

    oldtoolmaker Member

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    Bear:
    I just joined THR, and have some information on JimK's note that the round and flat teat cartridges are not interchangeable, if anyone is still interested in the Moore-National revolver discussion. The early revolvers, made by D. Moore Co. (later name changed to National Firearms) were made for the flat teat cartridge. Problem with this was the cartridge had to be radially oriented when loaded in order for the flat teat to lay on the striking anvil. Later the flat teat was changed to a round teat so the orientation was not needed. Problem with this was that the revolver needed a slight clearance to be put into the striking anvil in order for the round teat to go all the way into the cylinder. Some of the early guns were modified by gunsmiths and possibly by Moore-National. The modified guns, like the later ones would then take both type teats. Thanks, guys !
     
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