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NCIC Check for firearms

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Seven High, Apr 6, 2006.

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  1. Seven High

    Seven High Member

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    If a person was considering purchasing a used firearm from an individual, wouldn't it be convenient to check to see if its been reported as stolen by checking it with your personal computer thru the FBIs web site. What do you think?
     
  2. usp9

    usp9 Member

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    Do you have a link to do this check?
     
  3. Mizzle187

    Mizzle187 Member

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    Im sure there is someway to do a check but I dont think you would have to go through NICS(of they even do that) maybe your local agency. Although IM sure you know this but Ill say it just for the hell of it and its just my opinion. I would not buy a gun from anyone that I didnt completly trust and know very well unless they were a vendor at a gun show or a shop no matter how bad I want it or good of a deal it is. Some will probably disagree but thats my take on it.
     
  4. AirForceShooter

    AirForceShooter Member

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    here in Fla we have a website run by the LOE's.
    Just put in the serial number.
    It's not perfect but it's something.

    AFS
     
  5. Seven High

    Seven High Member

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    NCIC Check

    USP9: To the best of my knowledge such a web site does not exist. I think that it should.
     
  6. Roccobro

    Roccobro Member

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    I'm sure you sould call the local LE office and give them the serial number to run for you. If it does come back with a "hit" either hang up or tell them where to find the gun.

    Tell the seller you need the serial number for a parts check (if you don't already have it). But Like Mizzle says it's about trust. The seller should be more concerned about your character if there is no background check done on the sale (if he really is legit).

    Justin
     
  7. isp2605

    isp2605 Member

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    We'd get calls occasionally asking to run a number. We wouldn't do it over the phone and I can't believe any agency would do it sight unseen from some anonymous caller. That's definitely not good police work. We would send a Troop out to eyeball the firearm and run the serial number. If it came back stolen, obviously it would be confiscated, a case opened to track how it got to where it's at, and it would be returned to the rightful owner.
    As far as only buying off those you know, you still have to be careful. My brother picked up a .22 Ruger several years ago from a friend, kept it a couple of years, then traded it. His friend had bought it from another friend who had bought it used at a gun shop trade. The guy my brother sold it to removed the grips to clean it and there was a note that said "If you find this gun it has been stolen from...." and listed the guy's name. Sure enough, it was stolen but the legit owner didn't have the serial number so it was never entered into NCIC.
    Another case - a friend bought an FBI commemorative S&W, Model 19 or Model 27, don't remember which at this late date, from his brother in law who had picked it up from a dealer in St Louis. When he showed it to me I told him that particular commemorative was only sold to FBI agents. A check with the FBI located the agent in Little Rock who had reported the gun stolen when his house was burglarized. When the PD entered the gun they transposed 2 numbers in the serial number which is why it didn't hit when we checked NCIC.
    You really never know if you're buying a stolen.
     
  8. Standing Wolf

    Standing Wolf Member in memoriam

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    Mere commoners have no right to know?
     
  9. cz75bdneos22

    cz75bdneos22 Member

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    would that be something like a national gun registry?
     
  10. isp2605

    isp2605 Member

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    "Quote:
    That's definitely not good police work.

    Mere commoners have no right to know?"

    Not at all. 'Mere commoners' would know. The reason why it should be done eyeball on is because the caller isn't confirmed who he is and if it comes back stolen how often do you think the 'mere commoner' would say "sure, come over, confiscate the gun I just paid for, and question me where I got it." That's why it's done eyeball on not on the phone. Doing it on the phone is definitely not good police work. No more so than a 'mere commoner' calling and asking to see if there was a warrant on them. How often do you think 'mere commoner' will stick around once they find out they are wanted?
     
  11. WvaBill

    WvaBill Member

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    Then anyone can access any of the databases with our information spread across them?

    To me, the question is, "Should there be so much info. on commoners available to LE or .gov?"
     
  12. WayneConrad

    WayneConrad Member

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    I think we're getting off track. All that's being considered here is a web site or phone service where I supply the serial number, and then find out whether or not that gun has been reported stolen. Not only is that web site not a gun registry, it doesn't even have to have a gun registration database to work. Only a list of stolen guns by serial number. It doesn't even have to list who they belong to. Just the law enforcement agency to contact.

    Not only would a service like that be welcomed by private buyers, it would be useful to those who have had guns stolen. Wouldn't you like to know that your stolen guns have been properly entered into the database?
     
  13. isp2605

    isp2605 Member

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    "Not only would a service like that be welcomed by private buyers, it would be useful to those who have had guns stolen. Wouldn't you like to know that your stolen guns have been properly entered into the database?"

    I'm sure it would be welcomed and useful, to a point. But here's what would happen. Joe buys a guy from somebody he doesn't really know. Gets it home, decides to call in the serial number. It comes back hot. Now what? Do you think average Joe is going to tell the police "Sure come by and pick it up." The police won't give Joe back his $500 he just paid for the gun. The gun is confiscated. So Joe will be out the money, out the gun, and will have to tell what and who he bought it from. That's the problem with doing telephone checks. People, as honest as I'm sure everyone on this list is, just don't do that. BTDT. They'll lose the gun, or it really wasn't my gun I was running for some guy, or they try to take the matter in their own hands. So the idealistic view of running a gun over the phone, sight unseen, will more likely than not end up not getting the stolen gun back to it's rightful owner but most likely will end up getting stolen guns pitched in some lake.
    Think about it. It's no different than if Joe would call the police to see if there was a warrant out for Joe. Joe confirms there's a warrant and Joe knows to head out of town. NCIC is full of people who know there's a warrant for their arrest but they aren't sticking around as good citizens to get right with the world. They're gone. Same would happen with stolen guns checked over the phone.
    So call the police. They'll send someone out to eyeball the gun. If it's hot then it will be confiscated and returned to the owner. If it's not in the computer, the police go on about their business and you head to the range with your new purchase.
     
  14. SDM

    SDM Member

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    isp2605,

    If this service is available, Joe calls and finds out his newly purchased gun is stolen but does nothing about it, how is that different than if he couldn't call and find out. The way it is now he has to go to the police to find this out. If Joe is so dishonest he wouldn't give the gun to the rightful owner, he surely isn't going to stroll into the police department to find out.

    I just don't see how having this service would hurt anything, and I think it would increase the odds of stolen guns going back to their rightful owners'. Just my opinion, maybe there are factors here I haven't thought about.
     
  15. WayneConrad

    WayneConrad Member

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    The service isn't for ol' Joe. Joe isn't going to call anyhow. He doesn't care if it's stolen, he just cares that he got it for a song. The service is for buyers who'd like to know if it's hot before they make the purchase.
     
  16. >SHOCK<^>WAVE<

    >SHOCK<^>WAVE< Member

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    A gun thief could use it to determine if the theft they perpetrated has been discovered, with that info the thief can determine witch market to sell it on to maximize profit and avoid detection.
    I think it would nice for us non-law breakers to have that resource available.
     
  17. WayneConrad

    WayneConrad Member

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    Shock Wave, could you please explain in more detail? I can't imagine it.
     
  18. >SHOCK<^>WAVE<

    >SHOCK<^>WAVE< Member

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    If it's stolen from someones cabin and they don't know and haven't reported it the thief can sell it to a pawn shop, gun store or gun show since it's not yet in the database listed as stolen, provided he has fake ID. If it has been reported stolen it will have to be sold on the "street" or "black market" stolen property is usually sold for less than legal property do to the risks and ramifications.
     
  19. WayneConrad

    WayneConrad Member

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    Shock Wave, Thanks for 'splaining it. I understand what you're saying.
     
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