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Need an easy to conceal Smith

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by Jabr0ney, Mar 31, 2011.

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  1. Jabr0ney

    Jabr0ney Member

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    Ive been looking for smaller easier guns to conceal and decided i want a revolver. Derringers and the Naa minis look awesome to me, but don't seem adequate for defense. Maybe eventually ill get one, but this gun im buying now will be my first concealed carry. My mom has an LCR, i like it except i tried putting it in my pocket and the big rubber grip was a hassle to pull out.

    Because of this ive been looking at the older J frame Smith .38s with the skinnier wooden grips. Any recommendations for something like this? I would prefer it to be able to shoot P+ but it isn't necessary. Or would a derringer (45 colt) or a NAA pug (22 mag) be worth carrying? I love the size of those, just throw it in your pocket and go.
     
  2. skoro

    skoro Member

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    The S&W 642 is just right in so many ways.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Jabr0ney

    Jabr0ney Member

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    i was thinking about that, its a little smaller than the lcr, right? at least thats what ive read
     
  4. Starter52

    Starter52 Member

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    S&W Model 37 with the factory wood grips and a Tyler T-grip.
     
  5. joeq

    joeq Member

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    I would go the 642/442 route. I prefer the 442 over the 642 just because I like the black better. I'm not sure if you're proficient with the double action only trigger but with practice these revolvers can be surprisingly accurate. I carry my 442 everyday in a Crossbreed Supertuck and the gun just disappears. I originally got mine to carry in the hot Texas summers but like it so much it's my year round carry. Surprisingly it's become one of my favorite pistols to shoot. I like the centennial models because without the exposed hammer I can get my grip a little higher and that really helps with muzzle flip and general control of the revolver. I have tried different grips but prefer the rubber boot grip that came from the factory.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2011
  6. PRM

    PRM Member

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    I like the S&W Model 649. Its a SS gun and has the shroud ~ you can still cock it for single action firing. Robertson's Trading Post has some police trade-ins for $389. Great folks to deal with. Mine came with some honest carry marks. Was tight as a brand new gun, I took the side plate off and the insides were pristine. I changed the grips out to factory wood and gave it some TLC with Mother's Mag Polish.

    They have one more listed on Guns America.

    http://www.gunsamerica.com/99841017...guard_Stainless_1986_Exc_Matte_Sttainless.htm
     

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  7. Remo223

    Remo223 member

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    The smallest revolver made (not counting the NAA mini) is the charter arms undercover. The cylinder of the charter arms is slightly smaller than that of other 5 shot revolvers.

    New charter arms revolvers don't come with small smooth wood grips, however. They come with oversized rubber grips. But what you can do is buy a brand new aluminum frame lightweight charter arms undercover and then buy a set of Barami hip grips for it.

    that will be the smallest revolver you can buy...pretty close to the lightest one too. smith&wesson is a little bit ligher...by like half an ounce I think.

    Or you can search for an old charter arms undercover. They have the old fashioned small wood grips. THEy aren't aluminum frame though and so they weigh more. I wouldn't recommend an older charter arms though, since some of the older vintage guns are not very good.


    http://www.baramihipgrip.com/
     
  8. joeq

    joeq Member

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    I've tried the Barami grips and Clipdraw system and I found them neither more comfortable or convenient when compared to a quality holster. I can draw faster out of a holster also. Not saying the grips are bad, just not for everyone.
     
  9. Remo223

    Remo223 member

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    Well sure, a holster on your hip is the ultimate carry method. Not everyone wants to lug around a holster though.
     
  10. joeq

    joeq Member

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    Not trying to argue, each to their own.
     
  11. Phydeaux642

    Phydeaux642 Member

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    642 in a Mika round cut pocket holster. 'Nuff said.
     
  12. bcp280z

    bcp280z Member

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    I think any airweight J frame will do, The 642 seems to be the most popular, but if you like the DAO design try for a 442, comes in black ;) But I would personally recommend a 438, it's DA/SA, spurred hammer, doesn't snag, gives you the option of SA if you're playing around at the range or need SA accuracy. Many will argue it's not the best in a SD situation with lawyers and all that legal junk, but I figured it's the only revolver I'm going to have for a while so why not be versatile.

    I saw a 638 in a local shop the other day with a longer barrel, wasn't sure how much but more than 1.87in would still be easy to conceal...and it was cheaper than what I paid....but it was used.

    Also alot will complain about the Hillary hole lock in the new ones but the pre-locks were before my time and it's not so bad if you have younger siblings or so, just keep the key on your keyring.
     
  13. Paladin38-40

    Paladin38-40 Member

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    Buy rite & never look back

    +1 for a round butt S&W J-frame with a Tyler T-Grip Adapter given your criteria. I have both 2'' and 3". I prefer 3" barrels and steel frames. They conceal and carry just as well as the 2" or Airweight in any conventional type holster and shoot better. Note I do not pocket carry. Find a good used one, the older the better.

    J-frame aficionados shoot mostly standard pressure loads even if we carry +P. I have my first model 36 bought in 1967. I have ran a few +P loads through it with no ill effect.

    Not to start a brand war but neither a Charter Arms nor an LCR is a pre-lock S&W. I'm not even sure an LCR is a real Ruger. Just sayin'.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2011
  14. Jabr0ney

    Jabr0ney Member

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    Im actually liking the looks of the model 37, would i be able to put a grip like that or the barami hip grip on a 642? And that charter arms undercover looks like what im looking for too, has anyone had experience with it? Reliability? Any issues?

    To me the big thing is the grip, because after pocketing the lcr with the big rubber grip, it was a b**** to pull out of my pocket fast
     
  15. mmitch

    mmitch Member

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    Or you could step-up a little:

    [​IMG]

    ...to a K frame model 15 snub.

    Mike
     
  16. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    I carry a 15oz S&W Airweight daily and would not be without one. The revolver disappears in your front pocket and is light enough you will always carry it instead of leaving it home.

    I like the M442 Centennial frame or M438 Bodyguard frame because I like "blue" revolvers but the silver M638 or M642 are just as good.

    You might even like the 14oz 38 Bodyguard. It has a built in laser and shoots well too.
     
  17. Paladin38-40

    Paladin38-40 Member

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    No blow smoke

    "And that charter arms undercover looks like what im looking for too, has anyone had experience with it?"

    I do not comment on guns I have no experience with. Not that I necessarily own them, but have had the opportunity to handle and shoot them more than once. There are 3 brands of small revolvers worth carrying home: S&W, Colt, and Ruger.

    You seem to be interested in a quality gun. Notice there is a strong consensus for S&W with several posters pointing toward the older models. There is a reason for that.

    The traditional S&W's are all good, the differences between them are a matter of personal preference and balancing the features with your primary intended use.

    The new S&W Bodyguard is another story. It in no way compares with the original Bodyguard model 49 and its variants. You could say it is a Charter Arms with S&W logo. It is S&W's attempt to compete in the low end of the market. As far as the laser is concerned the S&W switch design is not user friendly. Lasers are overrated in my experience and considered opinion but if you want one go with Crimson Trace.

    The Ruger SP101 is a fine gun, but the LCR is not a 101. It is Ruger's marketing strategy to compete in the low end of the spectrum.

    You get what you pay for and that includes within the same brand.

    Good luck in your quest.
     
  18. Remo223

    Remo223 member

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    If you are looking for silky smooth precise actions and craftsmanship to marvel at, charter arms is not for you. They are economical models. But as far as I'm concerned, silky smooth precise actions in a tiny little snubby is kind of a waste. All you really need is something that goes bang every time you pull the trigger.

    I carry an older charter arms with tiny wood grips and blued carbon steel frame. They are the most concealable revolver made in the last 50 years at least. But be warned, there's a lot of older charter arms guns that are junk. I have two complete older ones and parts to build a few more. You got to expect to get a few bad ones before you find a good one. You will also probably have to learn to work on them yourself. Or you could just buy a new one and save yourself the trouble. The new ones are reliable but they come with that stupid oversized rubber grip.

    Gunsmiths aren't very enthusiastic about working on a charter arms gun.

    I could go on and on about my problems with gunsmiths. Most of them I have little respect for. Most of them are pretty pathetic in terms of mechanical aptitude. Smith and wessons are utterly simple to work on. A monkey could figure them out. And guess what? They all love to work on smith&wesson and love to charge you up the wazoo to do something a 15 year old kid could do. But hand them a charter arms to work on and they start acting like they are too superior to touch it. To me, that is a sure sign of an inferior gunsmith.
     
  19. OldCavSoldier

    OldCavSoldier Member

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    I carried a CA UnderCover snub for two years as my tertiary back-up and some, er, special slugged loads, back when in mufti as an Army spook. Never had a lick of trouble with it. Good, solid piece. Although it was made in the late 60's/early 70's. I don't know about today's UC snubbies
     
  20. oldfool

    oldfool Member

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    the OP said "Smith" real plain
    S&W 442/642

    "would a derringer (45 colt) or a NAA pug (22 mag) be worth carrying?"
    No

    older S&Ws with skinny grips -
    I own an early model SS model 60 snubbie that pretty much defines that, 38+p no problem
    but it's strictly an OWB carry gun for me
    I believe you will be happier with a 442/642 per original post as stated
    lots and lots of aftermarket grips out there easily found for any of the above
     
  21. PcolaDawg

    PcolaDawg Member

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    What this guy ^^^ said.
     
  22. texas bulldog

    texas bulldog Member

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    While I don't own one, really like the Model 40 for your purposes:
    [​IMG]
     
  23. sixgunner455

    sixgunner455 Member

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    642. It's stainless, because you're carrying it in a potentially salty bath. It's completely enclosed hammer, because you're carrying it in a pocket or ankle holster, and the less crap that gets in the action the better, and the smoother the gun is on the draw, the better. It's DAO, because it's accurate enough, and because when you shove it some goblin's gut or up his nose and yank the trigger two or three times, you just want it to go bang.

    It's an aluminum frame, because 15oz in the pocket carries a lot easier than 20oz+. It's not a lot of fun to shoot more than half a box through in one sitting, and not much fun with +p when my arthritic wrist is acting up, but I can rip off five rounds into a piece of typing paper at 2-5 yards in 2 seconds or so. If I'm careful, I can do headshots out to about 7 yards. It works perfectly, too.

    642 prices are amazing right now. I've had my gun for over 7 years - if you shop carefully, you'll only pay about 50 bucks more than I did in 2004 ($329.00+tax). If you don't shop carefully, you'll pay a couple hundred more.

    642-1 and -2 are +p rated, if that matters. This is the one to get.
     
  24. Jabr0ney

    Jabr0ney Member

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    OK thanks for everyones input! Right now it seems like im either going with a 642 or an older model such as a 37. Are both reliable for shooting quite often? I plan to shoot it A LOT because i want to be as familiar with it as possible. And after some research people recommend not to shoot +P out of the older models, is this true?
     
  25. Paladin38-40

    Paladin38-40 Member

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    Compromise

    If you want to shoot a lot of standard pressure the 14 ounce Airweight S&W's (not 11 ounce AirLite's) are comfortable enough with cushy grips. A lot of +P in an Airweight is not so enjoyable for a good number of shooters.

    The steel frame 640 and 60 are 50% heavier at around 21 ounces. That's enough to make a noticeable difference in felt recoil but not enough weight to be bothersome in a belt holster. Unless someone is enamored with pocket carry I see no reason for an Airweight.

    FWIW the favorite of my 4 J-frame's is a 3" 60 FL with adjustable sights, about 25 ounces. Small enough to conceal and carry well, large enough to shoot well. The least favorite and rarely carried is a 37 Airweight.

    As always, try before you buy if at all possible.
     
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