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Need help with id

Discussion in 'Firearms Research' started by Rick4ugarfield, Nov 20, 2016.

  1. Rick4ugarfield

    Rick4ugarfield Member

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    Bought this as a winchester 30.06
    Cant find no numbers just some symbols. Any help would be appreciated.
     

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  2. Bullseye
    • Contributing Member

    Bullseye Member

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    From a distance it looks like a 1917 eddystone that is sporterized
     
  3. Rick4ugarfield

    Rick4ugarfield Member

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    20161120_163755.jpg 20161120_163651.jpg 20161120_163629.jpg 20161120_163711.jpg 20161120_163545.jpg 20161120_163534.jpg 20161120_113019.jpg 20161120_163755.jpg 20161120_163651.jpg 20161120_163629.jpg 20161120_163711.jpg 20161120_163545.jpg 20161120_163534.jpg ] Here is a few more
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2016
  4. Bullseye
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    Bullseye Member

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    Yes that is a 1917 Enfield. A military rifle from WW l.
    Could be any of a number of names under the front scope mount where there may be some more info.
    The other marks are Arsenal and Ordinance marks. Now that it has been altered it is what it is. You can't turn a pickle back into a cucumber, but still, it's a neat rifle.
    Eddystone, Remington, Winchester Model of 1917. Many of these military rifles were converted by civilians to shoot/hunt with. You have what appears to be an old weaver 4x fixed power scope maybe. I had a Remington many years back.
    Look at these, HERE for similar rifles. By the way, that is a nice "sporter"! and welcome to THR

    PS: You might want to use the "edit" option under your second post and delete some duplicate images.
     
  5. Rick4ugarfield

    Rick4ugarfield Member

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    I tried, aint too computer smart....lol. I took off scope, couldn't take off front mount.....1 screw and one rivet.
     
  6. Bullseye
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    Bullseye Member

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    No need to take it apart. It probably says US model 1917 Winchester under there. It's not a rare bird.
    I've seen much worse and some better.
    Your rifle is altered like many of them were. Unaltered ones get a lot more money but you have a dandy deer killer there.
    Make sure it is functional and be safe.
    Here's what it looked like 100 years ago. Click on the little picture.

    View attachment 225519
     
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  7. Rick4ugarfield

    Rick4ugarfield Member

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    thank you for the info sir.I only paid 200 for it. Think I will keep it...lol
     
  8. Bullseye
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    Bullseye Member

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    Good for you! Enjoy!
     
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  9. Arkansas Paul

    Arkansas Paul Member

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    I certainly would not have turned it down for 2 bills. You did good.

    Some of those old military rifles will surprise you with how accurate they can be.
     
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  10. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    Yup, US Model of 1917, may have been made by Winchester, Remington, or Eddystone.
    No point yanking off the front scope base to see which, all the modifications have eliminated any collector interest, what you have left is a good stout hunting rifle.
    Based on British Enfield Pattern 14 .303 which we made for them until SMLE production caught up.
    That based on British Enfield Pattern 13 .280 which they were figuring on modernizing with, but were overtaken by WWI.
     
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  11. Rick4ugarfield

    Rick4ugarfield Member

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    thank you sir, just wanted to make sure it was a 30.06 before I bought ammo
     
  12. Gaucho Gringo

    Gaucho Gringo Member

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    A bit of trivia history. Eddystone was 2 corporations set up in 1915 and both owned in part and built in their property by the largest manufacturer of locomotives, Baldwin Locomotive Works to manufacture guns and munitions in WW1. Due to the charter(the founder of BLW was a devout Quaker) BLW was prohibited from producing these items. There was Eddystone Rifle Plant a joint venture with Remington to produce rifles(Mosin Nagants & 1917 Eddystone) and Eddystone Ammunition Corp to produce munitions.. Many strange things happen during wars.
     
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  13. natman

    natman Member

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    No guarantee on that. There's a good *chance* that it's a M1917 in 30-06 that was sporterized and is still in the original chambering. However, the British used the same rifle in 303 British called the P14. Many of them were converted to magnum calibers.
     
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  14. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    Doubt a P14 .303 would have an Ordnance Bomb stamp.
    Pictures of the bolt face would clear it up for sure.
     
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  15. Rick4ugarfield

    Rick4ugarfield Member

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    Bolt face??
     
  16. Archie

    Archie Member

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    That is a an Eddystone rifle, sporterized. The other possibility would be a commercial model 30 Remington; the same basic rifle, but made for commercial sale. The ordnance bomb identifies it as an M1917 (U. S. military) rifle. They were produced in .30-06 and typically, that was not changed when reworking them into a hunting gun. Some possibility it has been rechambered as the M1917 action was and still is one of the strongest ever built.

    Try an empty .30-06 case in the chamber. Make sure the case is hooked by the extractor; close the chamber to see if the bolt closes 'easily'. There should not be any 'looseness' in the case in the chamber.

    The bolt face is the front of the bolt, where the base of the case sets. The M1917 was made so the bolt face fit the case exactly. The .303 Brit version had a more or less 'flat' face without much edge to accommodate the rimmed .303 Brit cartridge.
     
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  17. carbine85

    carbine85 Member

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    I have an Eddystone sporter my Father-in law gave me. It's a great shooter. It was sporterized back in the day when you had to fetch your meat in the hills of Kentucky and Tennessee and the store was too far away.
     
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  18. Rick4ugarfield

    Rick4ugarfield Member

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    Here is the pics i think you ask for
     

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  19. Bullseye
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    Bullseye Member

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    Looks good Rick, make sure your barrel is clear now that you have that bolt out and get us a range report with that 30-06.
     
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  20. Rick4ugarfield

    Rick4ugarfield Member

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    Will do sir!!
    Thanks again for your help. All the guys that replied, you guys are awesome.
    Rick
     
  21. Bullseye
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    Bullseye Member

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    Again, welcome to THR. You'll like it here. Lots of knowledgeable members and a no nonsense place.
     
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  22. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    Bolt has no extractor. Second picture shows the extractor collar and no extractor.
     
  23. Rick4ugarfield

    Rick4ugarfield Member

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    Took bolt apart to clean
     
  24. boom boom

    boom boom Member

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    The ordinance bomb indicates that it was a Model 1917 rather than the Remington Model 30. A few of them have been rechambered in .308 Norma or even .308. The magazine/trigger guard has been straightened to fit flush which also reduces capacity to 5 rounds. A hint on disassembly of the bolt, get or make a u shaped metal shim for removing the bolt sleeve assembly from the firing pin. Ebay has a guy making them for less than $10 or you can make one from sheet metal. It saves your fingers. Dayton Traister used to make a cock on opening kit if that is what you prefer. Second, be really careful of the ejector--it is a fragile spring that can break--best to have a spare--Numrich aka gpc sells them. There is a better retrofit available. Last, but not least, if checking the headspace using gages, use fingertip pressure only with a stripped bolt. The leverage on a 1917 can crushfit a headspace gage to the chamber rendering it useless.
     
  25. Dr.Rob

    Dr.Rob Moderator Staff Member

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    So how does it shoot?
     

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