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Need help with pid Mauser rifle

Discussion in 'Firearms Research' started by Brian halmagean, Nov 10, 2016.

  1. Brian halmagean

    Brian halmagean Member

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    Recently bought a rifle from my local dealer and the tag said k98 but what throws me off is that I've never seen a k98 that had this stock style nor have I seen a rifle that fired 7×57 that was a k98 as most are 8mm. The markings don't seem to match with German, Yugo styled 98s either. Could you guys help me out?

    Also would you guys know where I could purchase a new stock and iron sights to install as well? The current stock does not fit flush and whoever owned it seems to have attempted to modernize it so the top wooden piece wants to come off even with the scope on.
     

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  2. Scooter22

    Scooter22 Member

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    It's definitely a Turkish Mauser. Looks like a M38 that was shortened and the sights removed. The rear sight had a large head screw that locked the handguard down. It should be 8x57. What makes you think 7x57. Heres a great site for Turk Mausers.
    http://www.turkmauser.com/
     
  3. Brian halmagean

    Brian halmagean Member

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    A 8×57 round refuses to lock into the chamber, the bolt will not turn locking into place and I don't believe its a good idea to force it while the 7×57 round chambers quite smoothly
     
  4. desidog

    desidog Member

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  5. Brian halmagean

    Brian halmagean Member

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    Thats what I was thinking as well seeing how I've never seen a k98 fire anything other than 8mm.
     
  6. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    Barrel is not military profile, obvious replacement to 7mm.
    Bolt handle is odd screw on to clear scope instead of the nice custom forged or welded alteration.
    Hope you did not pay a lot for this pig in a poke.
     
  7. Brian halmagean

    Brian halmagean Member

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    Personally I'd rather it chambered in 8mm than 7×57 as I have about 1200 of 8mm
     
  8. Brian halmagean

    Brian halmagean Member

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    No only about 200. 8×57 is technically 7.92××57 correct?
     
  9. Ron James

    Ron James Member

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    If it shoots well, keep it as a nice light hunting carbine, the 7x57 is an excellent all around caliber. to try and restore it to any resemblance of it's military origins would not be cost effective, what it would cost you , you could buy two very nice capture K98s. JMO>
     
  10. Brian halmagean

    Brian halmagean Member

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    The year date is 1944 would that still mean its a m38 or m44?
     
  11. dh1633pm

    dh1633pm Member

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    I thought some early Turkish Mausers were barreled in 7x57 and then later re-chambered for 8MM (7.92x57)?
     
  12. Brian halmagean

    Brian halmagean Member

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    Every Turkish Mauser I've seen has been 7.92×57 but idk seeing how the previous owner wanted to customize it. I have yet to fire it as I disassembled it to clean as it was covered it loads of cosmoline grease under the barrel and action with some rust. Low and behold my brother decided to mess with it when I was out and got the bolt stuck into the receiver and now I cant remove it lol
     
  13. Scooter22

    Scooter22 Member

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    No. Many early rifles the Turks bought were 7.65x53 often called Argentine. That was a .311/.312 diameter bullet. Not 7x57 (.284). Can you remove the handguard so we can see if the barrel is tapered or has "steps" that a military barrel has. Thanks.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2016
  14. boom boom

    boom boom Member

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    That definitely is a bubba special including the bolt. The good news is that the Turks reportedly re heat treated their older Mauser receivers (these are generically known as Model 38's) so you should be good to go on receiver strength for most stuff that large ring Mausers can fire. The bad news is that the Turk is a large ring that uses a small ring diameter barrel. Can't quite tell from the pictures but the unmonkeyed with Turk receiver is inset in the front ring for completely covering the junction of the barrel and receiver face. Most converting these to sporters grind this lip on the receiver until it is flush with the actual receiver face. Otherwise, your choice in barrels without lathework to fit it can be limited.

    Steve Wagner has a website for amateur gunsmithing and goes into quite a bit of detail on the Turkish Mausers and how to sporter them with great commentary and step by step pictures.
    http://www.gswagner.com/
     
  15. Brian halmagean

    Brian halmagean Member

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    Yeah once I get it out of the shop I'll post a picture up. I have limited tools currently since I'm in the middle of moving residences but from the looks I cant do much to restore it compared to sporterizing it.
     
  16. boom boom

    boom boom Member

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    Model 38's had a 8mm small ring barrel as issued. Thus, if it is a 7.65x53, it should be easy to remove as it is not original to the firearm. Those barrels are actually pretty rare and you might be able to sell it for a decent price to a hardcore Turk Mauser collector through gunboards. Unaltered old 1893 Turk Mausers are hard to find and have generally poor bores to boot and so such a barrel might be of value to a restorer.

    Not that hard to restore or very expensive if you want as Turk model 38 barrels, stocks, stock furniture, etc. are readily available either thru numrich (aka gunparts corp), ebay, gunbroker for reasonable prices to restore it similar to as issued.
     
  17. boom boom

    boom boom Member

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    BTW, welcome to the board Brian.
     
  18. Brian halmagean

    Brian halmagean Member

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    I'd like it in 8mn but usually when I come across a barrel for one its sold out or way too expensive for my liking. I've restored old Mosin nagants 91-30 types for very cheap and arisakas as well. Stocks generally I can find but are usually separate from the hand guards which annoys me quite some bit.
     
  19. Brian halmagean

    Brian halmagean Member

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    By far the most difficult job I've had was restoring an old 1928 Thompson which I had to use my friends machine shop to build a new bolt system and carve the rear stock out. Second would be a 1919a4 Browning converted to fire 308
     
  20. Brian halmagean

    Brian halmagean Member

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    As per requested here are photos of the barrel whether tapered or has steps.
     

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  21. Mauser lover

    Mauser lover Member

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    Doesn't look like any military Mauser barrel I've ever seen... I would definitely get a chamber cast. Look up cerrosafe if you are interested in learning how to do it yourself.

    Is it cock on close or cock on open? I'm not exactly certain that is a large ring... I couldn't quite tell from the photos.
     
  22. Brian halmagean

    Brian halmagean Member

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    Cock on open. Thats why I was just as stumped but it looks like the stock was definitely but down from the turk Mausers I've seen and from the info everyone here provided its a m38 ankara thats been modified quite a bit. When you say large ring, are you referring to the base of the barrel or the stock ring at the front?
     
  23. aarondhgraham

    aarondhgraham Member

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    Okay, I give up.

    Whatinna heck does "pid" mean?

    Was it just a typo thatr was supposed to read "id"?

    Aarond

    .
     
  24. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    Looking at the keyboard, I think "pid" came out when "old" was wanted.

    The receiver ring is the front part of the action where the barrel screws in.
    A large ring Mauser has the receiver ring larger than the rest of the action.
    Kind of slide your eyeball down the left edge of the action from rear to front. You will see a step up from the left rail to the receiver ring, that identifies it as a large ring action. A small ring action does not have that step up to a larger diameter.
     
  25. Mauser lover

    Mauser lover Member

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    The front of the receiver is the "receiver ring". They came in a couple of sizes. Here is a picture link...

    http://benchrest.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=8845&d=1260162936

    Let me know if you can't open it. Basically, they made the front of the receiver bigger in the 1898 version, and the label "large ring" has stuck. The picture shows the pronounced step between the ring and the rest of the receiver. I can't quite tell from your photos if it is a large ring or small. Cock on open suggests large ring, bit there is probably a cock on open small ring variant floating around out there...
     

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