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Need new wheel pocket gun!

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by Optical Serenity, Sep 1, 2006.

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  1. Optical Serenity

    Optical Serenity Member

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    So I had a S&W 638, but wasn't crazy about it. I'd like a .357 wheel gun that is small enough to fit in the pocket, what would you recommend?
     
  2. 1 LT MPC

    1 LT MPC Member

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    A .357 small enough to fit in your pocket will present a lot of problems with felt recoil. Most folks I know who have snubbies in .357 stoke them with .38+ P's. (Which also recoil). IMO, if I were to insist on the .357, I would go with either an inside the waist holster or a belt carry. In that case, my Ruger SP 101 fills the bill. On the other hand, a good J-frame Smith in .38 special is much easier to conceal and quite potent with +P ammo. I guess I should mention some of the older Colt snubbies, as I often carry a Cobra and like it very much. Keep in mind that some of the older snubs don't work well with +P.:D
     

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  3. kentucky_smith

    kentucky_smith Member

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    Smith Scandium Airlite. Shoot one before you buy it though.




    It's not all that bad. ;)
     
  4. Master Blaster

    Master Blaster Member

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    I have been very pleased with my Smith&Wesson 642 in .38spl +p
     
  5. weregunner

    weregunner Member

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    Just to be different check out the Ruger SP101 in .357 Mag. I owned said model in .38special+P.I was impressed with the overall quality and design.Mine worked well.However, the S&W 60 sounds pretty good.Only know a few people who have them.All reports were positive.
     
  6. ChristopherG

    ChristopherG Member

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    People who really carry a .357 in their pocket these days mostly carry either the 340 or 360 by S&W. They weigh 12.5 oz's and are indeed painful to shoot with full-powered ammo. Many do carry them with 38+P (including myself sometimes), but others carry and shoot them with real live .357. If you do so, bring a bandage for your hand to the range. I'm not kidding.

    You could try to put a steel 640 in .357 in your pocket, and it'd fit just fine; but it would also sag pretty powerfully, being a heavy chunk of steel. Weight is pretty crucial for pocket carry.

    What didn't you like about the 638?
     
  7. Run&Shoot

    Run&Shoot Member

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    Why a pocket .357?

    I once owned a SP101 2 1/8" .357 with the bobbed hammer (DAO). It was fantastic. Easily handles the .357 hot loads, and easy to shoot. But at about 25+ oz loaded it was no pocket gun unless you have some pretty heavy duty pockets. The thing is, that with .357 loads you are getting a huge muzzle blast (not good for night vision when things go bump), but not a whole lot more velocity (relative to a 4" or 6" barrel). Is all the blast worth a couple of hundred more fps?

    More recently I got a S&W 642 .38 +P, the Airweight Centennial (concealed hammer) at about 15 oz unloaded. For me this is at the top end of acceptable weight for a pocket gun. I gave this one away to a daughter and plan to replace. Most likely another 642. Possibly with a 340PD 10 oz .357; but not because it is .357 but for the 10 oz weight. that would ride easily in a pocket. If ther was a 10 oz. .38 version I would just as soon buy that.

    I really don't see the point of a .357 pocket revolver. If you want that kind of power then I would look at the very small 20 oz. Karh PM9/40, Glock 26/27, XD 9mm and .40 subcompact pistols. The 9mm and .40 do much better in shorter barrels and the recoil mechanism asorbs some of the recoil.

    But the 642 is just about the ideal balance of weight, power, and concealbility. You must join THE club. :)
     
  8. Border

    Border Member

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    342PD or 340PD. Load with .38 +P.
     
  9. Optical Serenity

    Optical Serenity Member

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    Well I guess it doesn't have to be a .357, but I like having the option of using .357 ammo or .38 special.

    I actually just want something more powerful than my old keltec p32. Maybe a P3-AT, but...a revolver is more reliable.

    I didn't like how the 638 felt. Not sure how to describe it, but I never shot well with it..
     
  10. fastbolt

    fastbolt Member

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    Well, your perceived needs, desires and what's available which might satisfy you might not actually overlap to the degree that you might wish. Sometimes it just happens.

    Not everyone will like the compromise that's an Airweight.

    Ditto when it comes to the Airlites. Personally, I don't like titanium cylinders and being restricted to jacketed bullets. (You can imagine how I might therefore feel about titanium frames produced by another maker.) The noticeably increased recoil found in the Airlites chambered in .357 Magnum must be felt to be believed. I've demonstrated the ability to perform accurate rapid doubles & triples when shooting an Airlite J-frame .357, loaded with 125gr full power Magnum ammunition on silhouettes at 11 yards ... but it's not high up on my list of fun things to do. ;)

    The steel J-frames chambered in .357 Magnum might be more to your liking, as far as felt recoil goes, but they're 'lightweight' only in comparison to a SP-101. Your call.

    Snub revolvers sort of redefine the term 'compromise' when it comes to lawfully concealed diminutive handguns. Larger caliber than the .22, .25 ACP & .32 ACP pocket pistols, and able to use heavier, more powerful loadings than the .380 ACP ... but also generally requiring more refined revolver skills than larger revolvers. Some of the very qualities and attributes that make them attractive for concealment potentially make it harder to accurately (and safely) shoot them.

    Personally, while I've developed a real liking for the Airweights ... (I have a 642 & 37, and which use required some additional range time for me, refining my older revolver skills) ... I also like the way a steel J-frame feels and balances in my hand.

    I really liked my older 649 Bodyguard (.38 Spl), and might add one of the newer Magnum chambered 649's to my working collection someday. Granted, it won't be any more appealing to me as a 'pocket revolver' than my slightly lighter & older 649, but I think the slight added weight of the 'shrouded' Magnum-capable Bodyguard frame (approx 1/2 oz), compared to the standard 2 1/8" Magnum-capable M60, wouldn't be very noticeable . I just like the Bodyguard series, though, and can find 'justification' to own another one pretty easily.;)

    The 2.25" SP-101 DAO is a nice short-barreled revolver, and I've sometimes carried mine in the large cargo pockets of an insulated vest, but it pulled down on that side, and balancing the opposite side with comparable weight made for a heavy vest for all-day wear. I think the SP-101 is a better belt gun, but everyone's tastes and perceived needs may be different. Tried one?

    Even though a steel-framed short-barreled revolver might weigh more than you'd wish, it might offer you a better shooting platform ... and that might be the compromise you're looking for ...

    Dunno. Your call. Luck to you, though ...

    I gave up on small-caliber pocket pistols a long time ago, myself .
     
  11. JoeHatley

    JoeHatley Member

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    Hard to beat a 642...

    642_2r.jpg

    Joe
     
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