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Need recommedation on Hunting Knife

Discussion in 'Non-Firearm Weapons' started by doorman, Oct 22, 2010.

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  1. doorman

    doorman Member

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    Hey all,

    I am looking into purchasing a moderately priced fixed blade knife primarily for deer skinning etc.

    By moderately priced, I am willing to spend say $100 or so.

    I have seen plenty of knives at Gun Shows, Academy, even Wal Mart and I am just trying to get pointed in the right direction.

    Thoughts?

    RU
     
  2. Gordon

    Gordon Member

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    I must be honest, the best animal processing knife under $1000 is this , I used the original on 3 continents over 50 years for the purpose. You replace the blades all though they can be sharpened if one had to. They are the best. Get a RAT 4" to 7" outdoor blade if you want a survival knife. If you want to process game there is no comparison to this:
    http://www.wyomingknife.com/knives.htm
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2010
  3. Slamfire

    Slamfire Member

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    You don’t have to spend much to get an excellent knife. As long as you are not chopping wood with the things, you can find a belt knife that will handle all the chores you want without pulling your pants off due to the weight of the thing.

    I am of the opinion that if you want to chop wood, you should use an axe.

    In so far as skinning, I used one of these in skinning a deer. I used a different knife for field dressing, but this one was the best for skinning.

    The Buffalo Skinner is an authentic American design, one of the original “Green River” knives, dating back to the 1830’s. At $21.50 it is a deal.

    Personally I found the sheep skinner a better “all around” design.

    russellskinningknife.gif

    http://www.dexter-russell.com/Universal_Prod_Display_2.asp?Line=T&Type=06

    One manufacturer who is often forgotten is Grohmann. Grohmann knives are very well made and are excellent designs. The sheaths are top quality leather and the rose wood on my handles have lots of nice figure. I own the Canadian belt knife and it is an excellent utility knife. It is literally the length of a steak knife but thicker. It works very well slicing steak, vegetables, and fruit.
    GrohmannCanadianBeltKnife.gif

    This Grohmann is a true skinning knife, quite smaller than the Buffalo skinner, but lots of curve to the blade. Should work very well as a skinning knife.

    Grohmannskinner.gif

    http://www.grohmannknives.com/index2.html

    That Wyoming knife is a very clever design.

    Too bad the Morseth Casade Hunter has been off the market for at least 15 years. I have one, used it in field dressing and skinning, and it is an excellent design. Don't have pictures of mine but you can find pictures on the web.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2010
  4. jbkebert

    jbkebert Member

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    I agree that a wyoming knife is a great tool. I took a swing-blaze by outdoor edge on a recent trip to TX. I was pleasantly impressed with the edge retention and feel of this knife. It feild dressed well and skinned very very well. It held its edge through a aoudad and a hog without touch up. Pretty easy to clean up it gets a A+ from me.
     
  5. dairycreek

    dairycreek Member

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    [​IMG]

    Take a long look at a Swedish Mora knife in one of its many variants. Tough,sharp, and inexpensive a Mora will make quick work of any skinning job. And, as a real bonus they are easy to resharpen.
     
  6. RatDrall

    RatDrall Member

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    I second the Mora recommendation.

    If you want a nicer knife, and feel like spending the entire $100, look at a RAT Cutlery ESEE-3. It is the most usable knife under $100.
     
  7. Black Toe Knives

    Black Toe Knives Member

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    Doorman, If you want a custom knife in that price range. Made by a hunter for a hunter. I have couple available. If you want a $10.00 knife, I would suggest a Mora with a plastic sheath. The Rat Cutlery ESEE is great designed knife, but it is production knife selling at custom knife price.
     
  8. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    The Spyderco Moran is a great hunting knife with about a 3.5" blade. http://newgraham.com/store/product/786/Spyderco-Moran-Drop-Point-SCFB02P/

    The Mora's are inexpensive and easy to sharpen, but good quality.

    I personally carry a large Trapper pattern folder for the detail work and a larger fixed blade for whatever else I might use a knife on. I have the Spydie Moran however and carry it from time to time. It is all you need, really. Recently purchased the Queen below and I'm pleased with it as well.

    Queen makes some relatively inexpensive fixed blades. I have one of these in D2 steel and have been quite pleased with it once I sharpened it up. It is offered with various handle materials. I have the black micarta handle version. For me it is a good general purpose fixed blade for hunting uses that doesn't bother me if I scratch up the blade a bit and it is small enough for small game or detail work for deer when field dressing or skinning. http://www.eknifeworks.com/webapp/e...inner+with+Green+Maple+Burl+Handle/Q9787.html

    Buck and Case make similar knives with their normal steels.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2010
  9. Black Toe Knives

    Black Toe Knives Member

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    I handled the Spyderco Moran in VG-10. The knife really impressed me. The knife was hair popping sharp.
     
  10. Big Bill

    Big Bill Member

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    doorman - get one of Jim's knives if you can. They will really do the job.
     
  11. jyo

    jyo Member

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    Well, if you're willing to up the price a little (around $135), Fallkniven S1 is hard to beat!
     
  12. red rick

    red rick Member

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    I like a short, drop point blade knife for skinning. Like the Buck Mini Alpha Hunter or Benchmade Activator 211.
     

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    Last edited: Nov 7, 2010
  13. Armored farmer

    Armored farmer Member

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  14. Big Bill

    Big Bill Member

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  15. MutinousDoug

    MutinousDoug Member

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    I 2nd SlamFire1's recommendation. I've used the Canadian knife along with a medium stockman and similar since the late '70s with no complaint other than my Canadian happens to be SST. Oh, and the carbon steel stockman folder is problematic to clean the fat out of afterward. A fixed blade is the pro's choice.
    I recently made a "sheepskinner" out of an "Old Hickory" carbon steel 1095 skinner much like Slam's Buffalo skinner by shortening the blade with a dremel, wheel and stone. Apparently you don't need to make your own: just get his recommended sheepskinner, it's effectively a "Nessmuk"design.
    The trailing point on the last knife Slam recommends is one that I would call a caping knife for saving the skin around the skull for mounts; too much point behind the belly for me for general slaughter or butchering. Excellent for the purpose (if you can keep it sharp) but limited utility for getting your meat from the field to the freezer.
    I suspect there are a lot better butchers than myself out there in the woods, going out once or twice a year, I've poked too many unnecessary holes in guts and hides to consider myself an expert.
    Take this for what it's worth.
    Doug
     
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