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Need Some Encouragement

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by Nathanael_Greene, May 30, 2019.

  1. Nathanael_Greene

    Nathanael_Greene Member

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    Has anyone ever had a major stroke and been able hunt again?

    I'm improving after mine, but it seems like such a tough, long road to recovery.
     
  2. SharpDog

    SharpDog Member

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    Not the same, but quintuple bypass and Diabetes. Definitely lack stamina but a little-by-little it's coming back.

    Stick with it and do your physical therapy.

    Good luck !
     
  3. troy fairweather

    troy fairweather Member

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    are family friend had a few, he just moves slow and stops often. he said it has made him a better hunter. i am heavy and don't walk to fast so we have a good time in the woods. sorry to here about your stroke, and hope yo recover and get back out there.
     
  4. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    Well, now I don't feel so bad. I'm anemic as all get out, can't walk far without a rest. But, we have to do what we have to do, right? :D I can just stay home and hunt deer. I've already given up ever hunting ducks again. But, I have this opportunity for an elk next season. Come hell or high water, I'm going to do it! It's a paid hunt, so I'll get to ride in a SxS 4 wheeler and will have a guide. I just hope I can walk that final few yards in rough country.

    I think recovering from a stroke, I'd rely on the doc to tell me what or what not to do. Don't want the physical stress to get ya. You can always put off one season, ya know. Good luck and by all means, TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF!
     
  5. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    If you don't give up there is a good chance you'll make it back. It may take time, as in missing more than one hunting season, but you CAN get there. You may have to modify the way you hunt,and may need help from others, but it CAN be done. You may need to hunt off an ATV and may need help getting game out.

    I have a buddy that I played football with from 2nd grade through 12th. He had a very serious stroke about 10 years ago at age 52. He came very close to dying but recovered. He had to relearn how to walk and even talk again. For over a year he couldn't even speak coherently. It took him 2 years to learn how walk with a walker.

    Today he can walk for short distances without the walker. But he still needs it for longer walks. His speech is fine, you'd never know he had ever had a stroke. His motor skills have returned to near what they were earlier.

    The key is physical therapy and how you react to it. If you work hard at it things improve faster. The fact that you have the motor skills to type and post here says you are already in pretty good shape.
     
  6. Sypher....

    Sypher.... Member

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    My son's fifth grade teacher fell from a ladder and broke his back, and became a paraplegic. Not sure how long it took him, but he was in his late 50's early 60's, still teaching grade school, and still hunting. He had a lot of help and support from his wife, friends and family.

    Not the same, but as long as there is a desire and will, I'm sure you and your loved ones, family and friends can figure a way (with doctors guidance) to get you back in the field.

    Good luck, and God speed in your recovery.
     
    MCgunner and Nathanael_Greene like this.
  7. WestKentucky

    WestKentucky Member

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    Thankfully I have not. But my grandfather did. He never really cared much for the killing part but he loved sitting on the edge of a field watching the deer play. After his stroke he missed 1 season and then was back out there in his lawn chair. He killed a doe for his neighbor when he got back. I believe that the doe was one of about 3 deer he killed in his life. He still liked to go squirrel hunting as well. He just wasn’t quite as surefooted so we stayed out of the rough areas. Before the stroke he used a 22 if the leaves were off and a 410 if the leaves were on. He used the 410 a lot more after the stroke.

    And a friend of mine is roughly 60, had a very very serious stroke. He was on machines at the hospital for about a week. He had lost all speech and all motor control. He has retired from work now, but he has taken up shotguns. He shoots a lot and is pretty good. He still has fine motor control issues but he is hell on orange things that fly.
     
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  8. Loyalist Dave

    Loyalist Dave Member

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    I think this is the key.

    You will have a mental problem in that this injury = a drastic change. So the definition of "hunting" for you abruptly changed, and this abrupt change bothers you, annoys you, now. That's normal.!

    BUT if you think back, over your life, "hunting" was changing for you then too, but gradually, so you didn't notice it so much. Who of us that are 50+ years and older can say they hunt the same way and with the same success as they did when they were 20? ;)

    I think for you, you need to set small goals for mobility, and strength.
    Talk to the docs and the physical therapist, and even consider a chiropractor too. Seriously, you can be out-of-alignment and not feel it, and during your stroke recovery you musculature may weaken a bit from reduced use, Ensuring your spine and neck are aligned will speed up recovery from the stroke as misalignment can hamper that, AND alignment will help when you start strength building too. I missed the 2014 deer season because of problems from my knees to my feet..., so my wife convinced me to see one of those "snake oil salesmen" chiropractors. Turned out I was being stupid, and they are legit, and my hips and lower spine were off, but I felt it and it impacted my lower legs. Had I gone in September of 2014 instead of January 2015, I wouldn't have missed a thing. :oops:

    Work your goals, and expect delays and roadblocks, but don't stop. There's more than one way to skin a cat, and there is more than one way to harvest deer and other tasty critters. So when you're back to a point where you can go "afield", then work on how you're going to go about harvesting the critters. If it seems discouraging, well imagine you're off in some foreign country, with weird laws about hunting, and you the American have to adapt to their methods. ;) As silly and frustrating as those foreign regs may seem.

    Finally, program your own sub-conscious mind. Yeah this will seem "odd" too, but it works. You sub conscious doesn't know the difference between negative and positive inputs. Your conscious mind does, and understands, but not the sub-conscious, SO only say positive things to yourself about your situation, and say them out loud to yourself each morning when you get up, and each night as you go to bed.
    I love a good fight
    This is a good fight
    I get more coordinated every day
    I get stronger every day
    I will hunt again; I can't be stopped; I am figuring this out.
    I can't wait for tomorrow.

    Send us progress reports too :thumbup:

    LD
     
  9. buck460XVR

    buck460XVR Member

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    You and your doctors are the only ones that can really answer this. You first have to have the health to get yourself in the woods and the determination and drive to push yourself to do it. Most states have disabled hunting opportunities where you can hunt from a vehicle if you cannot walk far, then there are UTVs and other ways to get you out there. I help with disabled pheasant hunts at the local game farm. We use a coupla different ways to get hunters to the field that either cannot walk very far, or not at all. It may be not the way you are used to hunting, but it is better than not at all. Any of us that have gotten older realize that even without a severe health issue, we cannot hunt the way we did when we were 25. Just the way life is. I would start walking/exercising to see just how much you are capable of after conferring with your doctors is realistic. Then, when i realized how capable I was, I would go from there as to what and how I would return to hunting. For me, just getting back into the woods with a gun/bow in my hand would count, even iffin I came back empty handed.
     
  10. Nathanael_Greene

    Nathanael_Greene Member

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    Thanks. Very helpful.

    I was (relatively) lucky that I didn't lose any cognitive skills. I've regained some mobility, and I can walk short distances unaided. But I hit the dreaded "plateau", and sometimes it seems I'll never get much better.

    It's important to hear success stories. Congratulations to your friend!
     
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  11. Nathanael_Greene

    Nathanael_Greene Member

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    Thanks. Good story about your grandfather. More power to your friend!
     
  12. BigBore44

    BigBore44 Member

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    Don’t let a doctor set your limiting factor. You set it. Push yourself in small increments. Not all at once. And don’t doubt yourself. Whether you believe you can or whether you believe you can’t, you’re right. Think about that.
     
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