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Need the full skinny on Indian surplus .308

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Col. Plink, Mar 7, 2012.

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  1. Col. Plink

    Col. Plink Member

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    Hey y'all,
    I've looked at most of what is posted on the subject and have a good idea of which headstamps are supposedly suspect, but I need someone who is knowledgeable on the subject to share a run-down with me on the full situation: which stamps and years (also on the stamps?) are in question and other ways to tell, how widely affected, etc. Also considering reloading the powder for affected rounds I have if any. Any tips there? Thanks!
     
  2. Bwana John

    Bwana John Member

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    Indian 7.62 NATO from the 70's = Good

    Indian 7.62 NATO after the 70's = VERY Bad

    Headstamp will have year manufactured ( OVF 74 = 1974)

    I have also found 70's era Indian brass good for reloading, but needs ALOT of case length trimming.
     
  3. seasmoke

    seasmoke Member

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  4. jonnyc

    jonnyc Member

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    I generally go with the "70s good...90s bad", but I have had some good 90s also. If it looks clean and uniform, give it a try. The brass is good for reloading. Most of the bad stuff actually looked bad from the get-go.
     
  5. Vaarok

    Vaarok Member

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    I really loved the seventies stuff and should've bought much more. Ashy, but surefire and decently accurate.
     
  6. wally

    wally Member

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    I've shot up the ~1500 rounds of OFV 96 That I got from JG Sales. No problems, although it seemed to have even more velocity variation than Wolf steel case .308 does. I though it was fine for the price, something like $150/1000.

    Many of the plastic 10 round packages were opened and a note from JG Sales was included saying they'd culled rounds that showed obvious defects.

    The brass seems fine, although I've heard people say you should anneal the necks for longer life. Most of mine is just set aside in a 5-gal bucket for retirement when I'll have time to reload. I did reload a few initially to make sure it was worth saving.
     
  7. ball3006

    ball3006 Member

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    I have OFV 74 on strippers and plastic wrapped OFV98. Both have been just fine. My MAS 49/56 loves the stuff.....chris3
     
  8. HGM22

    HGM22 Member

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    I'm no reloader, but it amazes me that a country that developed The Bomb can't manufacture rifle ammo correctly.
     
  9. Col. Plink

    Col. Plink Member

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    My Saiga 308 doesn't like it, I believe it is because of the condition of the cases, kinda worn, don't un/chamber very well.
     
  10. wally

    wally Member

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    I believe the problems were in storage, not manufacture, hence all the corrosion. Storage will always be an issue in flood prone locations like much of India or Houston for that matter..
     
  11. 27hand

    27hand Member

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    OFV

    I can no longer find the link to an explanation of this ammo.
    As mentioned previously, the 70's stuff is good to go.
    The following is as near as I can remember

    The break point was when the QC for the ammo was turned over entirely to the Indian Govt and I don't remember what year that was.

    Supposedly, the tooling became worn, the QC worse and the ammo became ****.

    I'll continue to look for a link to a very good explanation and range of years when the ammo was good to where they filled the cases with pieces of brick. :)


    This isn't the exact post i was looking for but there is good info here
    http://www.militaryfirearm.com/Foru...What-is-wrong-with-indian-308&p=4376#post4376
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2012
  12. surfinUSA

    surfinUSA Member

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    If you buy surplus, you do know there is a reason they surplused it out instead of using it right.

    That said, I buy and use surplus, but when there are issues I'm not surprised.
     
  13. Onmilo

    Onmilo Member

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    I don't know what date the Indian I had tried was but it was pure garbage.
    It was actually WORSE than the Venezuelan ammo I tried and one had to work to make crappier ammo than that stuff.
     
  14. CnRnut

    CnRnut Member

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    Back in the day when Century had this stuff for $49 a can(640 rds.)we
    burned LOTs of it in Cetme's. Never an issue with,many,many,many 1000's.
    I wish I still had a few dozen cans of it.
     
  15. 27hand

    27hand Member

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    OFV

    In march of 2007 I must have cut and pasted a quote from a site unknown.

    The guy posting it had a friend who did some research and posted this


    Cut and pasted 5 years ago on the Pafoa site 2007

    Quote O.K. folks, news flash here.

    Turns out that until late 1979 the British ran, managed and controlled QC at the ammo plants in India. (read that as the same folks as Radway Green and similar firms)

    This is why I recently grabbed up some mid 1970's Indian Ammo and will be doing a range report in the near future.

    I have this info on very good source, a guy who knows his stuff. The 1970's Indian ammo he's had in the past, never gave a problem, went bang everytime and shot well. Now that I know the British were running things until approx 1980 it all makes sense.

    The 1980's and 1990's Indian ammo issues seems to be due to lower quality tech staff and heavily worn machinery, that is why it's the 1980-1990's stuff that's pretty much crap. (and most of what became available) Quote

    End of cut and paste 2007


    I'll still see if I can find the source.
    This Indian OFV issue has been around a long time.
     
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