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Need to ID an old S&W revolver M&P

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by Aggiefirefighter, Dec 14, 2006.

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  1. Aggiefirefighter

    Aggiefirefighter Member

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    Serial#774448 it has a small p stamped on the gun butt ass well. The grips are similar to the 1917 but it is a 38 S&W CTG. The last patent date is DEC. 29 1914. There are markings above the grips on the left side of the gun and one marking between the cylinder and end of the barrel on the left side as well. it has fixed sights. I hope someone can help.

    Thanks
     
  2. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    The following was extracted from a post in another thread, and should answer most of your questions.

    http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=204380
     
  3. Aggiefirefighter

    Aggiefirefighter Member

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    markings

    are there any particular symbols on the gun that I can use to find out its use in service?
     
  4. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    The only way we might be able to help you with the markings is if you could submit clear photographs of them. Within the production range of the .38-200 revolver, yours is an early one, likely dating from 1941. However you can be fooled, because S&W would serial number frames before they were made into revolvers and then draw them out of inventory later.

    It should have been shipped to England or a Commonwealth country, but some weren't. The British stamped proof and government ownership marks all over the revolvers they got, and stamped them "Not English Made" on the right side in front of the trigger guard. I suspect (with no way to prove it one way or the other) that your revolver might have been picked up by the Defense Supplies Corp. (DSC) that was really a government agency, and sold to a police department or defense factory. In that case the markings on the revolver would have come from them. For details follow the posts in the link I provided before.

    If you interested enough to spend some money, a $30.00 check made out to Smith & Wesson, a snapshot photograph to aid identification, and a full description of the gun may be sent to Smith & Wesson's historian at their factory. Mr. Jinks will go back through the records, find your particular gun, and send you a letter explaining the details as the records show them. This should include the date it was shipped, and who to. For additional details go to: www.smith-wesson.com
     
  5. The Real Hawkeye

    The Real Hawkeye member

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    I saw one of these in a gun shop yesterday. Looked pretty cool, and it had been converted to .38 Special, so I asked for the price. They were asking $300 for it, so I turned it down. Nice looking gun, but I'm glad I didn't get it after reading that you shouldn't shoot it.
     
  6. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    The .38-200 revolvers are now being priced as collectables rather then shooters. As collectables their value depends on them being completely original, and not being chambered to something else. Shooters have little interest in them because the .38 S&W cartridge isn't very popular, and when the revolver is rechambered to .38 Special accuracy is a something thing, with split cases a possibility. :eek:

    Never pay inflated collector prices for something that isn't collectable. :uhoh:
     
  7. The Real Hawkeye

    The Real Hawkeye member

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    Yes, that was my thinking as well, and I told them as much. I said to the man that if it was unaltered, I'd pay that amount, but being a converted chambering, it's not worth the $300 he was asking. He just siad ok and put it back under glass.
     
  8. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    Well he may or may not find a sucker, but it won't be you... ;)
     
  9. Aggiefirefighter

    Aggiefirefighter Member

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    what do the marks look like? there is not a "not english made" stamp or any other seemingly english stamps. the barrel, cylinder, and frame all match with the same serial # and it is still a 38 S&W.
     
  10. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    If (big "if") as I suspect the Defense Supplies Corporation go ahold of it, it would have gone to either a police department, or to a defense plant manufacturing whatever. In that case they could have stamped it with anything they wanted to. Such marks were not regulated by any authority except whoever had the gun. The only way you can get more specific information would be to have the revolver "lettered" by Roy Jinks at Smith & Wesson. His records might (just might) show which particular police department or defense plant - or whoever - got the gun.

    In 1941-42 there was a war on. Some strange and unpredictable things happened.
     
  11. Aggiefirefighter

    Aggiefirefighter Member

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    I appreciate it thanks
     
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