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needing some reading recommendations

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by 454c, Apr 17, 2007.

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  1. 454c

    454c Member

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    After toying with the idea of reloading for several years, I recently bought the ABC of Reloading book and looking to buy my next one. I saw the list in the sticky at the top of the page(good read) and I'm curious which one goes into more detail on the two subjects of powder selection and crimping.

    Powder selection. Looking for the pros and cons of each. Mainly concerning position and temp. sensitivity. Does such info exist or is it learned by trial/error and asking fellow loaders ?

    Crimping. I'm still bumfuzzled on the when and which one part.
     
  2. DaveInFloweryBranchGA

    DaveInFloweryBranchGA Member

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    "After toying with the idea of reloading for several years, I recently bought the ABC of Reloading book and looking to buy my next one. I saw the list in the sticky at the top of the page(good read) and I'm curious which one goes into more detail on the two subjects of powder selection and crimping."

    Metallic Cartridge Reloading

    "Powder selection. Looking for the pros and cons of each. Mainly concerning position and temp. sensitivity. Does such info exist or is it learned by trial/error and asking fellow loaders ?"

    You'd be time and effort ahead to pick out a cartridge and application, then ask other reloaders when you're starting out.

    Crimping. I'm still bumfuzzled on the when and which one part

    Figure out if you're reloading rifle or pistol and the application, then it's a lot easier to deal with.

    Pistol - most always
    Rifle - usually not, except in certain situations, such as tube fed magazines, hunting cartridges, certain applications, etc.


    Regards,

    Dave
     
  3. mek42

    mek42 Member

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    Typically automatic pistol cartridges take a taper crimp and revolver cartridges take a roll crimp. There are probably exceptions to this.
     
  4. Paul "Fitz" Jones

    Paul "Fitz" Jones Moderator - Emeritus

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    Crimping and taper crimping

    To me crimping is slightly folding the mouth of a case into any bullet that has a cannellure usually jacketed bullets. For lead bullets for match precision in .38 and ,45 I taper crimp where the case mouth stays straight but pushed into the lead bullet slightly.

    Fitz
     
  5. 454c

    454c Member

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    Thanks for the replys. The Metallic Cartridge Reloading book is next on my list.


    Cannellured bullets. Can both crimp types be used ? If so, what are the pros/cons of each?

    non-cannellured bullets. Is this a taper crimp only?

    How does the Lee factory crimp and Redding profile crimp fit in the picture?

    Handguns. The ABC book says handgun cartridges such as 45 ACP should not be crimped and yet I see many are taper crimping. Some insight here would also be helpful.
     
  6. Sunray

    Sunray Member

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    "...Typically automatic pistol cartridges take a taper crimp and revolver cartridges take a roll crimp..." Yep. However, revolver ammo really doesn't need a crimp unless you're shooting hot loads. Target .38's, for example, shoot better without any crimp. Take the flare out and stop. Just because there's a cannelure doesn't mean you must crimp.
    Semi-autos need the taper crimp to aid feeding. That alone can fix feeding issues in a .45.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2007
  7. Idano

    Idano Member

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    I second what Sunray said and add that I don't crimp any of my rifle rounds, but I only load up to 30-06. If I was loading a belted magnum then I would probably crimp if it the gun had a magazine. The only reason to crimp rifle is if you are using a tubular feed or magazine in a gun with high recoil and you are using a heavy bullet. The recoil on large caliber guns can allow the bullets in the magazine to move when the gun is fired. However, I have never seen that on any of my 30 caliber reloads.
     
  8. CZ57

    CZ57 member

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    454c: These are good recommendations. For the things you're interested in, you might want to think about the Lyman 48. I have the 46th and some of the most technical topics you'll run across in reloading are covered in the Lyman manual, as well as the basics of reloading. Many Lyman loads show pressure data and I've found that to be a great aide in evaluating the characteristics of various powders. If that isn't enough, there are very good sections on pressure measurement systems and exterior ballistics, statistical data and a complete description of powders currently available. At time of printing, anyway. In my view, this is the most inclusive single resource available to reloaders.

    There is another form of crimp that I haven't seen mentioned: the profile crimp for revolvers that Roll and Taper crimp in a single operation. Typically, you'll find that cast bullets are .001" above bore diameter, sometimes .002" or more. This is usually the case with Soft Swaged lead bullets and they don't require a crimp. A good number of people do crimp cast bullet loads however. You've probably heard the old saying that a perfect circle doesn't exist. Holding a bullet firmly in place is not the only function of taper crimping. It also helps provide concentricity in the engagement of the brass case to the bullet used, along with holding the bullet in place. For very fast magnum handloads, a good number of people have found the profile crimp die from REDDING to be well worth the money.

    There is nothing difficult about reloading. If you like technical aspects, as well as further detailed discussion on some narrowly discussed topics, you might want to take a look.

    Somebody, somewhere said that reloading isn't rocket science. Personally, rocket science doesn't scare me much as rockets are now about 1000 years old if history on the Chinese is accurate. With either, you have projectiles being propelled through the atmosphere towards an intended target with a combustible fuel source. The rocket's combustible fuel source is self contained in a single package with its payload, whereas the gun is the launch platform for the bullet. That's about it.;)
     
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