Quantcast

New 10 mm Ruger 1911 Problem

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by Huntolive, Apr 18, 2019.

  1. wojownik

    wojownik Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2009
    Messages:
    2,057
    Try some different ammo types, and try different magazines. Those are the easiest culprits to run down. More dramatically - if trying different mags and ammo doesn't work - the barrel could need some ramping and contouring, the chamber might be too tight, etc. Will also delicately raise the possibility that the heavier springs for the 10mm may be making your pistol more sensitive to limp wristing.

    I have a half-dozen 1911s - full size, commander, .45, 10mm, vintage and new ... All have been flawless and not finicky at all, straight out of the box - with the only exception being a Springfield 1911 that was pre-owned (the prior owner tried to tune his 1911, but did a poor job - Springfield customer service was happy to fix it, even though the issue had nothing to do with them). All of them have fed pretty much any ammo I've given them, and have had no issues with factory, Wilson, CMC or MecGar mags. My 10mm is a Colt Delta Elite, and it just purrs like a kitten ... with a kick.
     
    drband likes this.
  2. Mike J

    Mike J Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2007
    Messages:
    2,494
    Location:
    Georgia
    If I bought a new pistol & I had cleaned & lubricated it, read the owners manual & was relatively certain I was doing everything properly & it wouldn't work right with quality factory ammunition I would not try to fix it myself. I would call Ruger & ask for a shipping label.
     
  3. rpenmanparker

    rpenmanparker Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2018
    Messages:
    2,456
    Lot of ifs there. Not many folks will check all those boxes.
     
  4. Mike J

    Mike J Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2007
    Messages:
    2,494
    Location:
    Georgia
    Someone once told me, "when all else fails read the manufacturers instructions." They were talking about life not guns but I figure the same principle applies. I have been messing with this shooting thing for a while & even though I think I know what I'm doing it isn't a bad idea to read the manual. The long & short of it is if I know I have done everything I should I am not going to spend a lot of time messing with trying to fix a new gun. I'll call the manufacturer & let them handle it. When I first got my .45 acp SR 1911 I did adjust the extractor but that was after doing some research & making sure I wasn't going to mess anything up. It worked I just got hit in the head with a fired case from time to time.
     
  5. BC17A

    BC17A Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2018
    Messages:
    147
    This is normal for a new "production" 1911. When my Ruger 10mm was new, the extractor tension was on the high side (32oz), and had very sharp corners which made feeding rounds feel a bit notchy. Yours is no doubt the same. It'll get better and feed more smoothly after you've run several hundred (300-500) rounds through it so be patient. However, I like to speed up the process of wear-in on any production 1911. Ruger extractors are a little better than some others, meaning they already have a proper angle on them for helping rounds roll under the hook during chambering, but aren't as smooth as they really need to be. I always knock off the sharp corners with some 1000 sandpaper and then polish everywhere that the rim/groove touches to get the smoothest feeding. Below are the before and after pics of my Ruger's extractor. Yellow arrows point to the corners that need attention. I left the tension where it was and it settled in to around 24oz on its own, probably had about 400 rounds through it when I re-checked it.
    ext before.jpg extractor after.jpg
     
    Ramone likes this.
  6. critter

    critter Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    3,190
    Location:
    southeast AR
    I have the same gun. I'd give it a GOOD cleaning, light lubing and shoot the heck out of it with GOOD QUALITY ammo to get all broken in. Be SURE to hold it very solidly when shooting it-limp wristing is not good in a semiauto. THEN if it has problems, try to track them down. Likely won't.

    Mine has always been perfect from the get-go.
     
  7. Texas10mm

    Texas10mm Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2018
    Messages:
    2,145
    Location:
    Not DFW
    The OP hasn't returned to the thread. I always wonder when they do that.
     
    Dill likes this.
  8. rpenmanparker

    rpenmanparker Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2018
    Messages:
    2,456
    Ain’t it the truth? Do you think it is my fault? Jus’ sayin’.
     
  9. Huntolive

    Huntolive Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2012
    Messages:
    567
    Location:
    Virginia
    I just read all your comments and have learned a bit.
    Thanks, been busy Turkey Hunting. Pistols are great, but Hunting is my priority.
    FYI got a nice Eastern Tom (11" beard, 1 and 1/4 " spurs and 22 lbs) right here in my Virginia home.

    Guilty of not reading manual!
    I will say that if one is not brave enough to try new things, or smart enough to ask folks who have experience questions, then his shooting options will remain limited. At least I am trying something new.
    IF the gun wears in, am I right that the heavier overall gun and longer barreled 1911 will likely lead (with training and greater familiarity) to greater accuracy and better manageability of defensive/hunting 10 MM? I do hope to hunt w/ this eventually. I had heard 1911's were more accurate than other autoloaders in general, but trickier in maintainance and breakdown (more parts).

    Is it worth the effort to get to know the 1911?

    I'm definitely not giving up yet, I only had time to take the gun out once, that said, I agree w/ one of you that it sucks to pay north of $700 for a new Ruger (a brand I trust) and have problems out of the box, that said, many of my other autoloaders that I love I bought Used, and thus never had to "deal" with a break in period ordeal. Could that be part of the phenomenon?
     
    Choctaw likes this.
  10. Choctaw

    Choctaw Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2005
    Messages:
    902
    Location:
    Texas-Along the Old Preston Road Trail
    I have the SR1911 Target 10mm and love it. I often carry it as my service pistol. Pistol weight will help to absorb recoil and a longer barrel lends itself to a longer sight radius. Both are desirable attributes in a hunting pistol. I bought mine with the intention of using it for work and play (killing pigs mainly). I recommend you follow the suggestions on this thread and shoot that pistol. :thumbup:
     
  11. South Prairie Jim

    South Prairie Jim Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2019
    Messages:
    465
    Location:
    South Prairie Wa.
    I can’t say I’ve shot the 10mm but I love my 45s
     

    Attached Files:

  12. Huntolive

    Huntolive Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2012
    Messages:
    567
    Location:
    Virginia
    I had a pistol range instructor and myself inspect and fire the gun again he recommended I send it directly back to Ruger because it should shoot all types of ammo not just ball and it was not adequatelyloading the first round either with slingshot or the slide release properly
    If you said they need to go over it and polish it. This is my first big disappointment with Ruger.
    For what they sell this for they should take the time to polish the guns so that it shoots defensive ammo not expect someone to waste a thousand rounds smoothing out the gun unless they want to provide a thousand rounds of free ammunition with every purchase.
     
  13. rpenmanparker

    rpenmanparker Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2018
    Messages:
    2,456
    Good information. When you relate your results to Ruger, they will have a better idea of what is wrong. That is why the slingshot test is helpful. Just a test...
     
  14. JTQ

    JTQ Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2009
    Messages:
    7,221
    Location:
    NW Florida
    When you get your 1911 back from Ruger, try loading up your mags and letting them sit for a few days before you go to the range to shoot the gun.
     
  15. drband

    drband Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2014
    Messages:
    1,983
    Location:
    GA
    Be sure to send at least one of your mags to Ruger with the pistol so they can see if they are the problem!
     
  16. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2007
    Messages:
    12,520
    Location:
    Georgia
    I've been shooting 1911's for 40 years. I like them, but I've never owned one I'd trust if my life depended on it. Mine are range toys. Any gun should function 100% out of the box with most any ammo in 2019. That was often an excuse back in the 1970's and 80's but there is no excuse anymore.

    Everyone should own a 1911, but I prefer them to be in 45 ACP. I also have a G20 and G29 in 10mm. They will always shoot a LOT softer than a 1911 despite the lighter weight due to the design and the fact that the plastic frame will flex some during recoil. Out of the box you won't see any difference in accuracy, but they will be a lot more reliable.

    A 1911 that has been worked over by a skilled gunsmith with parts replaced and trigger jobs can be made more accurate than a Glock. Or one that had that work done at the factory. But we are talking about $3000+ guns. I've never seen a sub $1000 1911 that was any more accurate than a Glock or any other pistol.
     
  17. rpenmanparker

    rpenmanparker Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2018
    Messages:
    2,456
    In disagree. My stock 1911s are the most accurate guns I own.
     
    wojownik, Texas10mm and fjblair like this.
  18. Tallball

    Tallball Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2014
    Messages:
    3,894
    I have various 1911's and 1911 "inspired" handguns. One that I bought new had to go back to the mothership. It is still fussy about ammo. The rest of them have given me zero problems.

    Here is my latest. It was inexpensive when new, and I bought it after it had been used a fair amount. It seems to work just fine. I only put 50-75 rounds through it the other week, but it went bang every time.

     
    drband likes this.
  19. drband

    drband Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2014
    Messages:
    1,983
    Location:
    GA
    I've had personal experience with 3 1911s so far. One very used 4" RIA .45. One new DW .45 and one new RIA in 9mm/.22TCM. They have all been trouble free other than normal cleaning and maintenance. I don't get the idea that newer 1911s are unreliable. I have carried all 3 of these and never had them fail to operate when used.
    Small sample--I know. But really, if 1911s were so unreliable or hard to keep up, would there be so many manufacturers and such a wide range of accessories. They seem to be an industry unto themselves.
     
  20. jerryd

    jerryd Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2003
    Messages:
    216
    Location:
    Ct
    I have been shooting 1911s since I was in RVN in 68, have had all different brands some expensive some cheap, but what I do is run a few hundred rds through them hardball to so called break them in! Some people say no need to but this is what I do. after that a good cleaning then try other types of ammo, and magazines too!
     
  21. fjblair

    fjblair Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2015
    Messages:
    89
    Location:
    NC Mountains
    LOL. Reality check needed.
     
  22. Huntolive

    Huntolive Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2012
    Messages:
    567
    Location:
    Virginia
    Interesting comments.
    Thanks, anyway this gun is on its way back to Ruger.
    I don't want a gun that has accuracy, reliability and limited ammo issues. If that's the case, there are Better options out there than 1911; I see why I avoided them for so long, and never understood why they were so sought after, now I am even more confused why with all the more reliable trouble free less ammo wasting options out there that they are still popular.

    I will give it a shot though; not giving up yet; will see what Ruger does.
     
  23. Mike J

    Mike J Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2007
    Messages:
    2,494
    Location:
    Georgia
    Please let us know the results of your pistols trip back to the mothership. Ruger customer service usually does really well.
     
  24. wojownik

    wojownik Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2009
    Messages:
    2,057
    Don't give up on the 1911 or the 10mm. My Colt Delta Elite has worked 100% out of the box, and has digested every kind of ammo I've fed it.

    A friend has a Ruger 1911 in .45 - he's had a number of issues with it, the biggest one was the front sight dissappearing during a range session. Just flew off the second time he took it out to the range.

    My Colts, Springfields and Dan Wessons have all been amazing, reliable and accurate. With one exception (I think I mentioned before) where a pre-owned Springfield as "tuned" by the prior owner, and needed some work. Other than that, over the past 25+ years with 1911s, the only issue that I've encountered is with cheap or some factory mags. I generally use Wilson 47D mags, and have had no issues at all. It's not that the 1911 is finicky - its that some mags are just ... junk.

    Ruger should do right by you with their customer service..


     
  25. ATLDave

    ATLDave Member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2011
    Messages:
    8,084
    Hunt', 1911's aren't for everyone. A lot of people who like them (and I like them) want everyone else to like them, too. Of course, that's not special to 1911's - Glockophiles and ARists and AKites and wheelieboys will all try to argue with you that you should love their favorite gun. But it sounds like they aren't for you.

    I also think 10mm handguns (another thing I'm personally a fan of) probably aren't for you, based on your prior posts on the topic. That's OK; that cartridge turned out to not be for the majority of law enforcement agents who got told to use it. It may just not be a good fit for you. It seems like you tend to let the gun free-recoil a bit.

    That's common among people who are really rifle shooters at heart, and not unusual for folks whose handgun background has mostly been revolvers. Semi-auto handguns just require a different approach focused on holding the frame fairly stationary. Although there are lots of benefits to developing that skill/approach, it's not worth the time and effort for some people.

    It's OK not to like everything. It's even OK not to like things that are popular or widely viewed as good. I personally hate bananas and anything banana-flavored (yes, that included banana pudding, banana popsicles, etc.). I've reached the point in my life where I no longer feel the need to justify or explain my tastes on this. To me, they're gross. But you know what? It's ok that a lot of other people like them. As long as they're not the only option in some situation where I'm stuck eating the provided food, I really don't care that others love them, even if I can't understand how anyone can tolerate them.

    Send the gun in. If it turns out there's something wrong with it, then try it again after it's fixed. If you still don't like it, or if they say it functioned fine for them, then you know - you just don't like it.

    One other note regarding recoil. The 1911's weight and the high grip it allows/encourages (with a thumb-riding-safety grip) do help tamp down muzzle flip. As far as the physical smack-in-the-hand, though, I don't find 1911's particularly comfortable to shoot with higher-recoiling cartridges. The slender backstrap concentrates the force on a relatively small area. A double-stack grip width helps to me with reducing any discomfort. My preference is to combine a heavy metal frame with a double stack grip for things like full-throttle 10mm. Some people feel differently, and that's OK.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice