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New .22 can came in!

Discussion in 'NFA Firearms and Accessories' started by pdsmith505, Jul 8, 2017.

  1. pdsmith505

    pdsmith505 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2013
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    Some assembly required. :rofl:

    I haven't decided to go with cones or omegas yet though.
    19895113_10108537091611908_5880146431680517001_n.jpg
     
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  2. PegLegPeat

    PegLegPeat Member

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    Pics of the build process?
     
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  3. Ryanxia

    Ryanxia Member

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    That's awesome. I would check with an admin before posting about the build process, even though it is perfectly legal they are from the older crowd and usually put the kybosh on those kind of posts. I am also curious too though, I bought my first two suppressors, one from AAC and one from Silencerco, I think my next one will be a form 1.
     
  4. pdsmith505

    pdsmith505 Member

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    I have to wait until I go to NM for this year's elk hunt and I have access to a machine shop. Should get it done the end of august.

    Overall plan is to bore out the outer tube from .870 to .875 so I can use the smaller tube as spacers that will fit onto the baffles so it's easy to clean. The inner tube will be bored out as well for weight savings, and I will probably turn the outer tube down between the threaded portions for the same reason.

    Threading 24 tpi, direct thread the end cap.

    Everything is stainless... 316 tubes and 17-4 for the baffles. Plan for it to be good for use on everything all the way up to 5.7.
     
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  5. Darkbob

    Darkbob Member

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    Cones or Omega's, but no-go on K-Baffles? If you decide to go Omega's, you should try to contact Mr. Gaddini and get his blessing first. On another forum that talks about silencers :scrutiny:, they report that he has granted some form 1'ers permission to use his patented design for their home build.
     
  6. pdsmith505

    pdsmith505 Member

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    Cones and omegas seem, at least to me, to be significantly simpler to machine. They also allow for the core to be completely sleeved, making disassembly and cleaning easier. With a K, the cone portion would have to be pulled through the spacer/sleeve, getting hung up on build-up along the way. At least that's the way I'm figuring it.

    All of this is somewhat moot though... my planned trip got cancelled... so actual build date is up in the air. With my luck, it may be by the time I actually get around to this now, the patent on the Omega baffles will be up (patent is 2003 vintage... so in 2023).
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2017
  7. UhKlem

    UhKlem Member

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    Sep 8, 2007
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    Silencerco went to clipped parabolic cones in the improved Warlock II and Spectre II replacing the Omega style baffle. Clipped parabolic cones are used in just about all Silencerco designs now and variants thereof are used by Griffin, Rugged, and a few others in center fire and pistol cans, as well as Rugged Oculus 22. You can approximate parabolic cones with a short straight entry nose on a 60 degree abbreviated cone similar to what Thunderbeast does with 22 Takedown. Or you can run the cones all the way to the tube wall. Without a sound meter I doubt anybody can hear a difference. Even pressed stainless washers and aluminum spacers do well for rim fire. A version of the Griffin Checkmate 22 was essentially that, although their latest version has gone back to a milled monocore for customer ease of maintenance. For 5.7 use nested cones will deal with dispersing higher pressure gas flow better than K's or Omegas. I'd try the baffles unclipped first across hosts. If your starting with anealed 17-4 you probably won't need to heat treat it for a rimfire can, but for 5.7 use an hour at 900 F in a kiln or lead pot for at least the blast baffle will get the hardness up to optimum. If you plan on using carbide tooling 17-4 might machine better in the hardened state. Probably easier to drill in the annealed state. You'll have a stout 22 can however you make it.
     

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