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New gun

Discussion in 'Shotguns' started by mcmurry, Jun 16, 2019.

  1. mcmurry

    mcmurry Member

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    Nov 19, 2007
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    Location:
    L.A. Lower Arkansas
    My local Atwood's had several guns on sale for Father's day. Besides wanting a gun I don't have, I also wanted something to use in teaching my 11 year old grandniece, so I picked up a single shot .410. The ad said it was a Traditions brand, but the box and owners manual says RIA imports/Armscor . A Turkish import. Not a bad looking little gun. I didn't realize at first that the barrel doesn't separate from the butt stock. Instead it has a hinge. The exploded parts diagram and list has a listing for a safety, but I haven't seen an obvious one so I'll just do like I do with my other single shot shotguns. I was a little concerned as to why there was a little packet of four screws of two different sizes until I noticed the two lines on the butt. I presume these lines are indicators of spacers to adjust length of pull and the screws are included for that purpose so when removing a spacer, you don't have to find shorter screws.
     
    Mullo98 likes this.
  2. e rex

    e rex Member

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    Aug 25, 2015
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    Location:
    Nebraska
    Sounds like a nice little shotgun. A single shot 410 was the only gun on our farm back in the late 40's early 50's, a lot of meat was put on the table with that little gun. Wish I had one yet.
     
  3. Jeb Stuart

    Jeb Stuart Member

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    Congrats! I have really became fond of the single shots. Love the well build Midland Back pack. Simple, Solid, Easy.

    Many choices for barrels length, 12,20, and 410. Bonus and the fact that they accept Benelli/Beretta mobile chokes. Want a good Turkey gun etc, want light weight? Try them out. Just find the lenght and choke you want and bingo.

    KDVKljH.jpg
     
  4. Milkmaster

    Milkmaster Member

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    Murfreesboro, TN
    I will buy a Midland Backpack if they ever make one in 28ga. That would be a desirable gun in my mind. :)
     
  5. Jeb Stuart

    Jeb Stuart Member

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    Curious as to why? Especially with so may loads in all gauges. Seems like there would be a happy median for you. Of course the money involve in producing a 28ga. would not be desirable for the company. I wish you luck. I am sure there are others out there on the market.
     
  6. Milkmaster

    Milkmaster Member

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    I have found the 28ga to be what I think the .410 should be! The 28 ga is not that much bigger yet much more versatile and capable for my uses.
     
    P5 Guy, Jeb Stuart and LRDGCO like this.
  7. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

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    Oct 19, 2010
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    East TN
    Right.

    Just look at the National Skeet Shooting Association's classification tables...

    https://www.nssa-nsca.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/AVGS110107.pdf

    For the different classes, there is a small drop between 12, 20, and 28 gauge and then a big drop to .410.

    These averages are with .410-2-1/2" ammunition, I'm sure one could do better with the .410-3" and it's larger shot load.

    Apologizes for diverting the thread a bit.
     
  8. paulsj

    paulsj Member

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    Given the specs it's obvious 12ga should be chosen. This is due to large selection of low recoil loads exclusive to 12ga only. Another big plus is denser shot pattern means more successful shooting which builds confidence and willingness to continue with shooting sports.
     
  9. Jeb Stuart

    Jeb Stuart Member

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    What is interesting is the tight patterns I got at 25 yds with this little 18" shotgun. I was using a modified choke. I will be taking a number of my shotguns out in the coming weeks and testing for patterns for Buck shot. The fact that this little gun has been drilled for chokes is a plus. I will not be using the gun for anything other than use in heavy brush and swamps. Carrying this 4 1/2 lb shotgun is a breeze. I was thinking of using one of my Mossberg 18" but none have anything but a cylinder choke. And I hate carrying any long barrel shotgun. Thinking of having my Beretta 1200 cut all the way down and getting it drilled for chokes.
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2019
  10. #1buck

    #1buck Member

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    Jun 24, 2018
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    83
    I'd like a 28 gauge just because I don't have one. I'd jump on one in a single shot. I love a little single shot and it's my favorite type of shotgun for woods walking and squirrel hunting. What is said above about the difference between the .410 and 28 gauge just makes me want one more.
     
  11. Mullo98

    Mullo98 Member

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    May 11, 2019
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    189
    Location:
    Dark and ruined castle deep in Transylvania
    Nothing like a single shot .410, shame ammo cost so much , great for shooting snakes or breaking up dog fights by firing it on the ground. My grandpa had a New England single in .410. Keep it near the door for the aforementioned snakes. Post some pics of it.
     
  12. loose noose

    loose noose Member

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    Well, I've got 3 single shot .410's two are Chiappa and one is a Thompson Contender with a 20" barrel, I do reload for them as well as a Mossberg Pump that handles the 3" shells. I do enjoy the heck out of 'em! BTW the Chiappas are over and under one is .22LR and the other .22WMR, both are very accurate and very useful.
     
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