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Newbie question: Do you always have to debur cases after trimming?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by hokeyplyr48, Oct 28, 2009.

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  1. hokeyplyr48

    hokeyplyr48 Member

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    I've picked up a whole bunch of brass and finally got through it all so now I'm finally having to start trimming it down to 1.750. Can I just trim the cases and load them up or do I have to debur the edges as well?
     
  2. Noveldoc

    Noveldoc Member

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    Would recommend to save you bullet loading die and get proper seating in the chamber. I use the Lee turning tool with the pull string. Just takes a quick zip with a piece of emory paper.

    BTW, I think the Lee setup is the way to go. Fast and fun to play with.

    Tom
     
  3. jeepmor

    jeepmor Member

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    I trimmed a large batch in the "everything gets trimmed mode" once. Now I measure all the brass first and only trim those exceeding spec. This was a huge timesaver as most did not need trimming.

    I have a RCBS manual trimmer that I rig with my cordless drill. The zip trim still sounds better and easier than my method.
     
  4. loadedround

    loadedround Member

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    To answer your question ...yes. You will have to deburr the outside of the case mouth and you should lightly chamfer the inside of the case mouth also. Otherwise you could tear up the bullet's jacket upon bullet seating.
     
  5. qajaq59

    qajaq59 Member

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    Loadaround nailed it.
     
  6. hokeyplyr48

    hokeyplyr48 Member

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    Alright, I didn't trim everything, just the brass that was out of spec. Thats why I said I got through all of it (about 2-3 reloads) and now I have to trim it down.

    So if I got this:
    http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productnumber=495603
    And ran it on the inside and outside would that debur/chamfer it? Then I'd be good to go to load em up?
     
  7. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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  8. hokeyplyr48

    hokeyplyr48 Member

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    Why would you prefer that? It seems a bit harder to hold since it's smaller.

    Just curious...
     
  9. rattletrap1970

    rattletrap1970 Member

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  10. hokeyplyr48

    hokeyplyr48 Member

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    Well it looks like the hornaday and RCBS ones are of an identical design. Do you just hold them in your hand and run them through each case?
     
  11. ole farmerbuck

    ole farmerbuck Member

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    Yes you just hold them. Very quick results. Dont press hard or you will take off too much.
     
  12. hokeyplyr48

    hokeyplyr48 Member

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    Alright, thanks for the advice.
    Is there anything I should do to the primer pocket/flash hole?
     
  13. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    It is not all that small. It is easy to hold and use. Mine is over 25 years old and going strong. I also tumble brass after trimming/chamfering/deburring to help smooth out any rough edges.
     
  14. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Nope. Knock out media if it sticks in there. Unless you are prepping match brass, the flash hole is a non issue. The only primer pockets I uniform are on 6 PPC brass.
     
  15. hokeyplyr48

    hokeyplyr48 Member

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    Makes sense, thanks so much for all the help.
    I had planned to tumble them after trimming them for the exact same reason.
    Back to reloading and shooting!
     
  16. hokeyplyr48

    hokeyplyr48 Member

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    Is there a specific order? Should you chamfer before deburring or does it not matter?
     
  17. NCsmitty

    NCsmitty Member

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    chamfer, deburring are one in the same. You're deburring when you chamfer.


    NCsmitty
     
  18. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    1. SIZE first.
    2. Trim.
    3. Chamfer & deburr.

    If you are using GI brass, you also need to swage or ream the primer pockets to get rid of the crimp.

    rc
     
  19. Historian

    Historian Member

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    RCBS makes an attachment that fits on their trimmers. It deburs and camfers while you trim. I got one for .223 brass. It requires a little tinkering to get the thing set up correctly but once it's set, you're in business. Saves a lot of time.

    Historian

    "Democracy requires wisdom."
     
  20. atblis

    atblis Member

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  21. NuJudge

    NuJudge Member

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    You could use a Lyman "M" die instead of inside chamfering.

    I use a Giraud trimmer, which trims, inside and outside chamfers all in one step, but is really expensive. There is a cutter made for the Gracey trimmer that converts it from a simple trimmer to one that does all 3 at the same time, and it is just expensive. There is a RCBS trimmer that does the same, but is not as fast.

    CDD
     
  22. BADUNAME27

    BADUNAME27 Member

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    Short answer: No. But then you don't reeeealllllyyyyy have to weigh your powder charges either. . .

    Trial and error coupled with reloading can often result in trips to the emergency room.


    Your bullets have a rather thin jacket material. This copper suit of clothes has to tolerate quite a bit of energy coming at it in a variety of ways. Pressure, heat, acceleration, friction, rotational, and centrifugal just to name a few.

    As with any properly done machining operation, a finished part is free of burrs and other surface inclusions. Taking the burrs off your cases helps ensure your not scoring or compromising the jacket of your bullets when you move onto your seating operation. It also helps ensure your bullets are being held by the neck properly (alignment, concentricity, etc) as it is possible I guess to get a chip stuck between the bullets jacket surface and the inside diameter of the case neck. The potential for better accuracy is the result which is kinda what hand loading is all about.

    If your new to reloading I suggest these steps as a good base:

    Used brass:

    Use a decapping die to remove primers.
    Wash your brass in hot soapy water. I use a deep fryer and bring my solution of water/simple green to a raging boil.
    Allow brass to dry
    Tumble/polish back to a high luster using a non abrasive media. I like corncob and the orange smelling stuff that Frankford arsenal sells
    Resize your brass using quality tooling. I use either Redding Comp series dies or Wilson Arbor Press dies.
    Prime
    Charge
    Seat your bullets.

    New brass. Say a quantity of at least 500 pieces
    Use a neck mandrel die from Sinclair to straighten case necks
    Full length resize all cases
    Trim .01" to .015" off all the cases. (reason is you do it once and you never do it again because by the time you'd need to the barrel will be shot out and you'll either buy a new gun, have a new barrel fitted, and purchase new brass at the same time)
    Polish
    Prime
    Charge
    Seat
    Shoot
    Refer to used brass procedure.

    You wash the brass and polish before you size because any grit/junk/gunk stuck to the outside of the cases will get embedded into them (as brass is quite soft) the minute you run them through that die. Ignore this and what you've essentially got now is a crude lapping tool that is chewing away at your chamber and your tooling every time you stick a cartridge case in it. A decapping die gets the primer out without actually touching the case.

    This is a solid procedure taught to me years ago and it is used by numerous world class 1000 yard competitive prone shooters.

    Cheers,

    Chad
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2009
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